Beyond Earth: The Future of Humans in Space

Overview

Providing a foundation for space planners and anyone interested in human settlement in the solar system, this book theorizes about the near future, when the heretofore significant steps of humankind—traveling to the moon and building space stations—will be dwarved by new progress. Scholars and scientists raise and answer such questions as Why does space matter to us? What will ordinary life be like in space? and What will our homes be like on Mars or the Moon? This collection of findings by professionals ...

See more details below
Paperback
$25.08
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$27.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $2.53   
  • New (5) from $7.20   
  • Used (6) from $2.53   
Sending request ...

Overview

Providing a foundation for space planners and anyone interested in human settlement in the solar system, this book theorizes about the near future, when the heretofore significant steps of humankind—traveling to the moon and building space stations—will be dwarved by new progress. Scholars and scientists raise and answer such questions as Why does space matter to us? What will ordinary life be like in space? and What will our homes be like on Mars or the Moon? This collection of findings by professionals documents important research, laying the bricks for space-faring civilizations and even consults future space-dwellers—kids—for their visions. Working from the assumption that humankind has a biological need to explore and improve the quality of life, the wide variety of contributors successfully argue that space as a future human habitat is not simply possible, but manifest.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781894959414
  • Publisher: Collector's Guide Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/28/2006
  • Series: Apogee Books Space Series, #58
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Bob Krone, PhD, is a former U.S. Air Force jet pilot, commander, headquarters personnel officer, and chief of the nuclear policy section of NATO. He is an emeritus professor of systems management at the University of Southern California, a distinguished visiting professor in the school of business at La Sierra University, and an adjunct professor for doctoral programs for the International Graduate School of Business at the University of South Australia. He is also a member of the Aerospace Technology Working Group. He lives in Fallbrook, California.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2006

    The Future of Humans in Space

    Does humanity have a destiny? Are we to accomplish a task before ending as a species, or do we perhaps continue on, ever evolving and exploring? The explorers amongst us certainly want to continue, and their hopes are pointedly directed to the stars. The book 'Beyond Earth' is a compilation of essays from visionaries who are committed to achieving this goal. Their ideas and plans show a decided conviction on a destiny that includes advancing our frontier off of Earth. Getting off Earth is simple just get a big rocket and launch people upwards. Yet, in this respect, we're not advancing. If anything, we're retreating. To push the frontier of humanity, we have to establish a human presence in space. People must be able to live in an alien environment and while there, contribute to the welfare of those remaining behind. As we are seeing with the International Space Station, we can do it, but it isn't going to be simple. Further, any greater effort than an outpost in low earth orbit is going to need substantial support from most if not all nations on Earth. That is, all of humanity. Interestingly enough, should this come to pass, its greatest contribution may be less the extension of the frontier and more the unification of the nations on Earth. For with everyone working toward a singular goal, follow-on affects of reduced strife and greater collaboration would be a satisfactory and sufficient condition for establishing a human presence in space. The book 'Beyond Earth' is sponsored by the Aerospace Technology Working Group. It is a collection of short essays with each directly focused on a future with humans in space. Though the group's name indicates a bent toward hardware and equipment, most of the book's essays relate to the soft sciences. That is, topics mostly deal with how people need to organize, plan and collaborate. However, the view is not of shuffling a few of the existing paradigms around. Rather, most topics reach deep into the fundamental aspects of their particular issue and demonstrate how they could be used or altered to avail today's space endeavours. The beginning of the book sets the tone by encouraging the reader to consider existence as an integrated system between ourselves, the Earth and space. Symbolic of this is the overview effect, the spaceman's view of Earth as a fragile, narrow region of life support in an otherwise sterile universe (at least from what we know). After, the topics range from the philosophy of leadership, bacteria's parallel to our society and the commonality of truth, beauty and love. However, perhaps to round out the offerings, some essays do relate to hardware including risk assessment and robotics. But it is the emotive more than the tactile which drives the contents. Orchestrating this collection must have been challenging, given the depth and breadth of the essays, but the result speaks volume. Further, Bob Krone, the editor, avoids duplication in the book as well as repetition of existing debates. He has experienced authors who have already achieved significant undertakings in the space industry to provide the depth. The result is that each essay, though usually short at a few pages apiece, is a stand alone, thoughtful, and concise work. Time is needed to digest each. The average reader will get the most by pausing on completion, sometimes for hours, and work over the beauty of the ideas and its applicability. Because the author's views are usually not routine, another, perhaps better, approach is for a group of people to read the same essay and discuss the contents. Given the pointed views of the authors, this should lead to some pleasant debates. Most of all though, with debate comes awareness which is another big goal for the book. Given the scope of extending the frontier is our greatest undertaking, new approaches will be needed. The offering of ideas and direction is thus valuable but it can also have the effect of the 'arm-chair warrior'.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)