Beyond Exoticism: Western Music and the World / Edition 1

Beyond Exoticism: Western Music and the World / Edition 1

by Timothy D. Taylor
     
 


In Beyond Exoticism, Timothy D. Taylor considers how western cultures’ understandings of racial, ethnic, and cultural differences have been incorporated into music from early operas to contemporary television advertisements, arguing that the commonly used term “exoticism” glosses over such differences in many studies of western music.See more details below

Overview


In Beyond Exoticism, Timothy D. Taylor considers how western cultures’ understandings of racial, ethnic, and cultural differences have been incorporated into music from early operas to contemporary television advertisements, arguing that the commonly used term “exoticism” glosses over such differences in many studies of western music. Beyond Exoticism encompasses a range of musical genres and musicians, including Mozart, Beethoven, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Maurice Ravel, Charles Ives, Henry Cowell, Bally Sagoo, and Bill Laswell as well as opera, symphony, country music, and “world music.” Yet, more than anything else, it is an argument for expanding the purview of musicology to take into account not only composers’ lives and the formal properties of the music they produce but also the larger historical and cultural forces shaping both music and our understanding of it.

Beginning with a focus on musical manifestations of colonialism and imperialism, Taylor discusses how the “discovery” of the New World and the development of an understanding of self as distinct from the other, of “here” as different from “there,” was implicated in the development of tonality, a musical system which effectively creates centers and margins. He describes how musical practices signifying nonwestern peoples entered the western European musical vocabulary and how Darwinian thought shaped the cultural conditions of early-twentieth-century music. In the era of globalization, new communication technologies and the explosion of marketing and consumption have accelerated the production and circulation of tropes of otherness. Considering western music produced under rubrics including multiculturalism, collaboration, hybridity, and world music, Taylor scrutinizes contemporary representations of difference. He argues that musical interpretations of the nonwestern other developed hundreds of years ago have not necessarily been discarded; rather they have been recycled and retooled.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780822339687
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books
Publication date:
11/28/2007
Series:
Refiguring American Music Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
328
Product dimensions:
6.25(w) x 9.35(h) x 0.85(d)

Table of Contents

List of Music Examples ix

List of Figures and Tables xi

Acknowledgments xiii

Introduction: Beyond Exoticism 1

Part I: Colonialism and Imperialism 15

1. Colonialism, Modernity, and Music: Preliminary Notes on the Rise of Tonality and Opera 17

2. Peopling the Stage: Opera, Otherness, and New Musical Representations in the Enlightenment 43

3. The Rise of Imperialism and New Forms of Representation 73

Part II: Globalization 111

Introduction to Part II / Globalization as a Cultural System 113

4. Consumption, Globalization, and Music in the 1980s and After 123

5. Some Versions of Difference: Discourses of Hybridity in Transnational Musics 140

6. You Can Take “Country” out of the Country, but It Will Never Be “World” 161

7. World Music in Television Ads 184

Conclusions: Selves/Others, History, and Culture 209

Notes 213

Bibliography 261

Indez 291

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