Beyond Globalization: Making New Worlds in Media, Art, and Social Practices

Overview

Does living in a globally networked society mean that we are moving toward a single, homogenous world culture? Or, are we headed for clashes between center and periphery, imperial and subaltern, Western and non-Western, First and Third World? The interdisciplinary essays in Beyond Globalization present us with another possibility-that new media will lead to new kinds of "worldmaking."
This provocative volume brings together the best new work of scholars within such diverse ...
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Beyond Globalization: Making New Worlds in Media, Art, and Social Practices

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Overview

Does living in a globally networked society mean that we are moving toward a single, homogenous world culture? Or, are we headed for clashes between center and periphery, imperial and subaltern, Western and non-Western, First and Third World? The interdisciplinary essays in Beyond Globalization present us with another possibility-that new media will lead to new kinds of "worldmaking."
This provocative volume brings together the best new work of scholars within such diverse fields as history, sociology, anthropology, film, media studies, and art. Whether examining the inauguration of a virtual community on the website Second Life or investigating the appropriation of biotechnology for transgenic art, this collection highlights how mediated practices have become integral to global culture; how social practices have emerged out of computer-related industries; how contemporary apocalyptic narratives reflect the anxieties of a U.S. culture facing global challenges; and how design, play, and technology help us understand the histories and ideals behind the digital architectures that mediate our everyday actions.
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Editorial Reviews

author of Programmed Visions: Software and Memory - Wendy Hui Kyong Chun

"Thoughtful and insightful, this volume compellingly reshapes debates over global media with its rare interdisciplinary examination of the relationship between the global and the local."
author of Perform or Else: From Discipline to Performance - Jon McKenzie

"Exploring patterns of critical intervention, cultural remediation, and runaway speculation, these imaginative essays channel the logic of our zeitgeist, for Beyond Globalization opens the multiplicities of world making."
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Product Details

Meet the Author

A. ANEESH is an associate professor of sociology and global studies at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and the author of Virtual Migration: The Programming of Globalization.

LANE HALL is a professor in the department of English at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. His work examines digital art and culture, procedural and experimental literature, and the history of the book.

PATRICE PETRO is a professor of English and film studies at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. She is past president of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies and has written and edited numerous books, including Idols of Modernity: Movie Stars of the 1920s, Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the War on Terror, and Global Currents: Media and Technology Now (all published by Rutgers University Press).

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Table of Contents


Introduction: The Making of Worlds

1. Global Media and Culture

2. Burning Man at Google: A Cultural Infrastructure for New Media Production

3. Apocalypse by Subtraction: Late Capitalism and the Trauma of Scarcity

4. These Great Urbanist Games: New Babylon and Second Life

5. Format Television and Israeli Telediplomacy

6. Mediating “Neutrality”: Latino Diasporic Films

7. Killing Me Softly: Brazilian Film and Bare Life

8. The Man, the Corpse, and the Icon in Motorcycle Diaries: Utopia, Pleasure, and a New Revolutionary Imagination

9. Saudades on the Amazon: Toward a Soft Sweet Name for Involution

10. States of Distraction: Media Art Strategies Within Public Conditions

11. Bio Art

Notes
About the Contributors
Index

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