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Beyond Good and Evil ( Classics Series) by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
     

Beyond Good and Evil ( Classics Series) by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
 

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In the opening two parts of the book, Nietzsche discusses in turn the philosophers of the past, whom he accuses of a blind dogmatism plagued by moral prejudice masquerading as a search for objective truth; and the "free spirits", like himself, who are to replace them.

He casts doubt on the project of past philosophy by asking why we should want the "truth"

Overview

In the opening two parts of the book, Nietzsche discusses in turn the philosophers of the past, whom he accuses of a blind dogmatism plagued by moral prejudice masquerading as a search for objective truth; and the "free spirits", like himself, who are to replace them.

He casts doubt on the project of past philosophy by asking why we should want the "truth" rather than recognizing untruth "as a condition of life." He offers an entirely psychological explanation of every past philosophy: each has been an "involuntary and unconscious memoir" on the part of its author (§6) and exists to justify his moral prejudices, which he solemnly baptizes as "truths"

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013601369
Publisher:
Granto Classic Books
Publication date:
06/17/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
199 KB

Meet the Author

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (German pronunciation: ['f?i?d??ç 'v?lh?lm 'ni?ts??]; in English UK: /'ni?t??/, US: /'ni?t?i/,[1] NEE-chuh) (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) was a 19th-century German philosopher, poet, composer and classical philologist. He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and aphorism.

Nietzsche's influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism, nihilism, and postmodernism. His style and radical questioning of the value and objectivity of truth have resulted in much commentary and interpretation, mostly in the continental tradition. His key ideas include the death of God, perspectivism, the Übermensch, the eternal recurrence, and the will to power. Central to his philosophy is the idea of “life-affirmation,” which involves an honest questioning of all doctrines that drain life's expansive energies, however socially prevalent those views might be.[2]

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