Beyond the Book: Technology Integration into the Secondary School Library Media Curriculum

Overview

What does the secondary school library media specialist need to know about technology in the twenty-first century? This book answers the question with a wealth of practical information. Doggett explores the pros and cons of using technology in the schools and describes how it affects the roles and interaction of media specialists, teachers, students, administrators, school system, community, and parents. She also demonstrates how to get off to a successful start with technology. Various research processes, ...

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Overview

What does the secondary school library media specialist need to know about technology in the twenty-first century? This book answers the question with a wealth of practical information. Doggett explores the pros and cons of using technology in the schools and describes how it affects the roles and interaction of media specialists, teachers, students, administrators, school system, community, and parents. She also demonstrates how to get off to a successful start with technology. Various research processes, emerging technologies, filtering, and search engines are just some of the topics covered in this valuable guide.

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Doggett examines the pros and cons of technology, policies related to technology use, selection of electronic sources, and research process models before examining the roles of stakeholders and discussing the development of a technology plan. The author then describes technology components, offering lesson plan examples and providing an overview of the options for deploying computers. The sections related to curriculum offer outlines of common research models and online searching techniques. The balance of the book addresses the implementation of technology and is focused on the administration of technology within the school environment. The six lesson plans, two for grades six through eight and four for grades nine through twelve, are less than stellar examples of technology integration in the curriculum. Although "Exploring Health Related Careers" could provide a rich opportunity for technology integration, the lesson plan is based, with the exception of one Web site, entirely on print resources, requiring the completion of photocopied worksheets and one written paragraph for assessment. The introduction to this resource states, "This book discusses... newer technologies in a way meant to assist the library media specialist in dealing with so many changes and challenges." The book, however, does not provide a focused in-depth investigation of the integration of technology into the curriculum as the title suggests. One also might argue that not all the technologies presented are "newer." Nevertheless the book does accomplish the purpose of providing clear information regarding the changing environment of library media centers and programs in schools today and will be useful as such.Index. Biblio. 2000, Libraries Unlimited, 200p, $29.50 Oversize pb. Ages Adult. Reviewer: Kim Carter

SOURCE: VOYA, October 2000 (Vol. 23, No. 4)

School Library Journal
Within the last decade, school media centers have changed dramatically as the Internet has become a vital, constantly used resource. This guide not only provides background on the history of information technology in schools, but also offers practical advice about incorporating Internet research skills into any media-center-based activity. Doggett addresses weighing the pros and cons of technology; developing acceptable use policies; selecting and evaluating electronic resources; grant writing; working with students, parents, and teachers; and writing technology plans. Especially helpful are the sources for library automation and security products as well as six ready-to-use lesson plans for middle and high school students. Although written for secondary-school situations, this well-researched and practical book is a valuable professional resource that can be used at any level.-Susan McCaffrey, Haslett High School, MI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Booknews
This volume is meant to be a simple introduction to and explanation of the new technologies that may prove useful to secondary school libraries. It examines the technologies with the understanding that limited budgets require that a new technology not disappear into obsolescence shortly after purchase. It covers vocabulary, the pros and cons of technology, and advice about how to plan before adding new technologies. Doggett has spent 25 years introducing the latest computer technology to local and school libraries throughout Maryland. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Meet the Author

SANDRA L. DOGGETT is Library Media Specialist, Urbana High School, Ijamsville, Maryland.

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Table of Contents

Foreword
Introduction
A Brief History of Technology in the School 1
Pros of Technology 8
1 Schools to Careers Preparation 8
2 Changing Modes of Instruction 8
3 Assessment 11
4 Critical Thinking Skills 12
5 Wider Access to Information 13
6 Currency 14
7 High Motivation 15
8 Drill and Practice 15
Cons of Technology 15
1 Cost 15
2 Rapid Change 16
3 Compatibility 16
4 Copyright 17
5 Mix-Match Licensing Agreements 18
6 Lack of Training 19
7 Hardware, Software, Network Fragility 21
8 Equality/Inequality 22
9 Untested 22
What Is Technology? 25
A Integration of Technology into the Library Media Curriculum 26
B Developing Acceptable Use Policies 29
C Selecting the Best Electronic Sources 37
D New Reference Skills 45
Library Media Specialists 60
Teachers 68
Students 75
Principals/School-Based Administrators 76
Parents 77
Paraprofessionals/Library Media Assistants 78
Library Media Supervisors 78
The Technology Plan 83
1 Research Trends 83
2 Assess and Forecast Needs 83
3 Prepare Vision/Mission Statements 83
4 Create Action Plans with Alternate Future Scenarios 83
5 Process and Plan Evaluation 84
What You Can Do Personally 84
Grant Writing 85
The Components 90
The World Wide Web 90
Online Searching Techniques 96
Filters 108
Library Management Software 110
Media Retrieval Systems 115
Library Security Systems 117
Digital Versatile Disk (DVD) 118
Writing a Modern-Day Fable 120
Writing a Letter to the Editor 122
Exploring Health-Related Careers 125
Multicultural Child-Rearing 128
Poetry and Art Integrated 137
Reformers and Their Causes 142
Stand-Alone Computers 149
Local Area Network (LAN) 150
Wide Area Network (WAN) 156
What's the Difference Between an Intranet and the Internet? 156
Can an Intranet Replace Network Operating Software? 157
Beyond the School Walls 158
Date Lines 159
Conclusion 161
References 163
Index 173
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