Beyond the Burning Bus: The Civil Rights Revolution in a Southern Town

( 2 )

Overview

Anniston, Alabama, is a small industrial city between Birmingham and Atlanta. In 1961, the city's potential for race-related violence was graphically revealed when the Ku Klux Klan firebombed a Freedom Riders bus. In response to that incident a few black and white leaders in Anniston took a progressive view that desegregation was inevitable and that it was better to unite the community than to divide it, and created a biracial Human Relations Council which set about to quietly dismantle Jim Crow segregation laws ...
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Beyond the Burning Bus: The Civil Rights Revolution in a Southern Town

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Overview

Anniston, Alabama, is a small industrial city between Birmingham and Atlanta. In 1961, the city's potential for race-related violence was graphically revealed when the Ku Klux Klan firebombed a Freedom Riders bus. In response to that incident a few black and white leaders in Anniston took a progressive view that desegregation was inevitable and that it was better to unite the community than to divide it, and created a biracial Human Relations Council which set about to quietly dismantle Jim Crow segregation laws and customs. The Council did not prevent all disorder in Anniston, yet Anniston was spared much of the civil rights bitterness that raged in other places in the turbulent mid-sixties. Phil Noble, a Presbyterian Minister in Anniston and participant in the Council, offers his account of the events, carefully researched but told from a personal viewpoint. It shows once again that the civil rights movement was not monolithic either for those who were in it or those who were opposed to it.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781603060103
  • Publisher: NewSouth
  • Publication date: 4/1/2013
  • Pages: 172
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

The Reverend J. Phillips Noble grew up in Learned, Mississippi. After graduating from King College in Bristol, Tennessee, and Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia, he was ordained a Presbyterian minister. He completed graduate work in Edinburgh, Scotland, and Cambridge University in England. From 1956-1971, Noble was pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Anniston, Alabama, where the events described in this book took place. Over his career, he also served pastorates in Georgia and South Carolina, the last of which was Charleston’s historic First (Scots) Presbyterian Church. Noble was also Co-President of the Board of Pensions of the Presbyterian Church, USA. He has traveled extensively on six continents. Noble is married to Betty Pope Scott. They have three children (Betty, Phil, Jr., and Scott) and two grandchildren. He is retired and living in Decatur, Georgia. He is also the author of Getting Beyond Tragedy (2006).
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Table of Contents

Foreword 9
Preface 17
Acknowledgments 21
Introduction 23
1 The Anniston Bus Burning 33
2 Beginning Years 37
3 Early Bridges 42
4 Changing the Patterns of Segregation 56
5 The Events of the 1950s and 1960s 62
6 Anniston Simmers 69
7 The Bi-Racial Human Relations Council 75
8 Getting Started 101
9 The Library "Incident" 108
10 Slow Progress, But Progress 122
11 In Retrospect 137
Epilogue: Thirty Years Later 147
Appendix 151
Notes 161
Index 163
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2005

    Best single book on Civil Rights struggle.

    The book gives a grass roots story of the civil rights movement in a southern time during the 1960s. A reviewer from the educational radio rated it the best book on the civil rights revolution because it was relatively brief and had a positive note. It is a success story of the handling of racial issues in the South during the turbulent 1960. So novel was the cities appointment of a biracial human relations council that President Kennedy cited it as a model of all southern towns. It is unique also in that it is written by a white southerner as he experinced the dangers and threats of the Ku Klux Klan. It has the endorsement of the former Governor of Mississippi, William Winter and former Ambassotor of the United Nations, Andrew Young. Among other reviews it had been reviewed in the magazine of the Cambridge Society of Cambridge University. It was nominated for the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. It is a splendid and informative book about the Civil Right struggle.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 6, 2013

    Outstanding!

    Outstanding!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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