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Beyond the Shadow of the Senators : The Untold Story of the Homestead Grays and the Integration of Baseball
     

Beyond the Shadow of the Senators : The Untold Story of the Homestead Grays and the Integration of Baseball

by Brad Snyder
 

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"As thorough a history of a Negro league team as can be culled from the available sources... not just the history of a team but the tale of one city in all its social complexity."

--The New York Times Book Review

An enthralling narrative about a lost era in both baseball and American History, Beyond the Shadow of the Senators

Overview

"As thorough a history of a Negro league team as can be culled from the available sources... not just the history of a team but the tale of one city in all its social complexity."

--The New York Times Book Review

An enthralling narrative about a lost era in both baseball and American History, Beyond the Shadow of the Senators reveals the true story of the greatest baseball dynasty most people have never heard of--the Homestead Grays--and how the fight to integrate our national pastime began with this team.

Brad Snyder's (Washington, DC) articles on baseball and other subjects have appeared in numerous publications, including the Baltimore Sun, the Washington Post, and the St. Petersburg Times. B&w photos throughout .

Editorial Reviews

The Homestead Grays was arguably the most successful and most influential African-American baseball team in history. First organized in 1910 in a small Pennsylvania coal-mining town, the Grays became known as a barnstorming nine without equal. Boasting the so-called "Thunder Twins" (Hall of Famers Josh Gibson and Buck Leonard), the team captured several Negro League world championships and the respect and support of thousands of fans. Beyond the Shadow of The Senators recounts the long (1910–50) history of this exemplary combine and explains how its achievements helped bring about the integration of our national pastime.
Daily News-Sun
"Beyond the Shadow of the Senators" goes a long way toward chronicling the rich history of the Negro Leagues.
Publisher's Weekly
Well-documented and enjoyable... a fascinating and largely untold story.
"Forecast", Starred Review, February 17, 2003
Stan Hochman
...thoroughly researched ...a long-overdue study. Snyder, at last, gives [the Homestead Grays] the credit they deserve.—Philadelphia Daily News, March 4, 2003
Wes Lukowsky
Snyder weaves the personal stories into a textured account of a time when baseball symbolized the nation at large. A fascinating little-known chapter in the familiar story of baseball's color line.
—Booklist, February 15, 2003)
The New York Times
...as thorough a history of a Negro League team as can be culled from the available sources...a fine book.
Scripps Howard News Service
The story of a noble but heartbreaking team is eloquently told in Brad Snyders' Beyond the Shadow of the Senators.
Potomac Gazette
...an exceptionally comprehensive and well-researched narrative that traces the evolution of the Homestead Grays...
USA Today's "Sports Weekly"
Snyder uncovers a fascinating yet forgotten slice of history with his tale of struggle for integration in the nation's capital.
Publishers Weekly
Snyder looks at the roots of Jackie Robinson's integration of major league baseball, but examines that historic event from a variety of angles. This well-documented and enjoyable account illuminates the life of Sam Lacy, a crusading black journalist for a Washington, D.C., black weekly, and his efforts to force major league baseball to integrate. But the book is also a fascinating and largely untold story about the unholy but profitable alliance between Clark Griffith, owner of the Washington Senators, and the dynamic but shady Negro League team owner Cum Posey, founder of the Homestead Grays, a storied Negro League franchise founded in Pittsburgh. Using the burgeoning black middle class of WWII Washington, D.C., as a social backdrop, Snyder details how Negro League owners like Posey allied themselves financially with white Major League owners, renting segregated Major League ballparks (at exorbitant rates) for their Negro League teams while the white teams were on the road. The practice became particularly profitable in Washington after Posey moved his Homestead Grays (and such black stars as Buck Leonard and Josh Gibson) to D.C. from Pittsburgh in 1940. Disgusted by the Senators' racist owners and the team's inept play, black fans flocked to the pennant-winning Grays' games, which outdrew the Senators' games. Snyder also sketches the lives of great players like Buck Leonard with great sensitivity, insight and historical context. The book tells two stories: one is how the Griffiths, a legendary baseball family, killed baseball in Washington, D.C., through their own narrow-minded greed and racism; the other is the story of Lacy and Wendell Smith, his fellow black Hall of Fame sportswriter, and the extraordinary black athletes of the Negro Leagues and their determination to play baseball at its highest level. (Feb.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Highlighting the efforts by two African American sports columnists to integrate baseball in Washington, DC, Snyder discusses the reluctance of Washington Senators owner Clark Griffith to end Jim Crow baseball in the nation's capital. Griffith benefited financially from renting his home ballpark to the Homestead Grays of the Negro Leagues. Those who witnessed the Grays perform at Griffith Stadium saw such great ballplayers as Buck Leonard and Josh Gibson and also insured profitability for Griffith, whose woeful Senators were unable to do so on their own. An original work.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071431972
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Publication date:
01/20/2004
Pages:
420
Product dimensions:
5.92(w) x 8.94(h) x 1.22(d)

Meet the Author

Brad Snyder's (Washington, DC) articles on baseball and other subjects have appeared in numerous publications, including the Baltimore Sun, the Washington Post, and the St. Petersburg Times. B&w photos throughout .

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