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Beyond the Stars –NASA’s 50 Years of Manned Space Flight Part 1
     

Beyond the Stars –NASA’s 50 Years of Manned Space Flight Part 1

by Henry M. Holden
 
This 3,000 word, illustrated, Part I in the 10-part series Beyond the Stars -NASA's 50 Years of Manned Space Flight - Part 1 deals with the development of the rocket that eventually led to space flight. The Table of Contents follows along with Part 1. While each part in this series varies in size from 3,000 to over 10,000 words, all parts will be one price, and linked

Overview

This 3,000 word, illustrated, Part I in the 10-part series Beyond the Stars -NASA's 50 Years of Manned Space Flight - Part 1 deals with the development of the rocket that eventually led to space flight. The Table of Contents follows along with Part 1. While each part in this series varies in size from 3,000 to over 10,000 words, all parts will be one price, and linked to the next part. Currently five of the ten parts are published and we expect to have the remaining chapters published online by the end of 2012.

For thousands of years, humans have looked into the star-filled night sky and wondered if there is something beyond. Pre-historic man left cave drawings depicting the stars, and the Bible’s Old Testament contains the account of Elijah, prophet of Jehovah, flying to Heaven in a chariot of fire.
In ancient times, imagination about human flight was strong. Imagination led to the discovery of human flight. In Greek mythology there is the story of Phaeton. Lightning struck Phaeton, and he set the heavens on fire when he tried to dive his father’s chariot. The most often told Greek myth is that of Daedalus and Icarus. To escape the terror of Minos, the King of Crete, Daedalus fastened wings to himself and his son, and flew across the sea to Sicily. Icarus, as many youngsters do, did not heed his father’s warning and flew too close to the sun. The heat melted the wax holding his wings together and he fell into the sea.
Humans Solve the Riddle
The Chinese first developed rockets after they discovered how to make black powder from saltpeter (potassium nitrate), charcoal, and sulfur, about a 1,000 years ago.
The Chinese began experimenting with the gunpowder-filled tubes. At some point, they attached bamboo tubes to arrows and launched them with bows. Soon they discovered that these gunpowder tubes could launch themselves just by the power produced from the escaping gas. The rocket was born.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940015792201
Publisher:
Black Hawk Publishing Co.
Publication date:
11/28/2012
Series:
Beyond the Stars –NASA’s 50 Years of Manned Space Flight , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
204 KB

Meet the Author

In 2010 Henry Holden was awarded the New Jersey Aviation Hall of Fame Distinguished Service Award.
He is the author of over 900 magazine and newspaper articles appearing in national magazines such as Private Pilot, Plane & Pilot, Airport Journals, World Airnews, USAir, In-Flight-USA, American Aviation Historical Society's Journal, Women in Aviation, Woman Pilot, Airport Press and Aviation History, Vintage Airplane, Warbirds, Sport Aviation, and Upscale Living Magazine. He has been a commentator on the History Channel, and has published 43 books.
The original founder of the DC-3/Dakota Historical Society, Henry is a member of the Aviation Hall of Fame (New Jersey), Women in Aviation International, AOPA, and EAA.
Mr. Holden speaks at various events around the country and is available as a guest lecturer. His work has been the subject of a number of radio and cable television shows in New Jersey, Georgia, Oregon, and Washington State.
Henry Holden is formerly the News Editor East for Airport Journals and was a regular monthly contributor to the paper.

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