Beyond The Synagogue Gallery / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$27.36
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $15.50
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 45%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $15.50   
  • New (6) from $24.82   
  • Used (2) from $15.50   

Overview

Beyond the Synagogue Gallery recounts the emergence of new roles for American Jewish women in public worship and synagogue life. Karla Goldman's study of changing patterns of female religiosity is a story of acculturation, of adjustments made to fit Jewish worship into American society.

Goldman focuses on the nineteenth century. This was an era in which immigrant communities strove for middle-class respectability for themselves and their religion, even while fearing a loss of traditions and identity. For acculturating Jews some practices, like the ritual bath, quickly disappeared. Women's traditional segregation from the service in screened women's galleries was gradually replaced by family pews and mixed choirs. By the end of the century, with the rising tide of Jewish immigration from Russia and Eastern Europe, the spread of women's social and religious activism within a network of organizations brought collective strength to the nation's established Jewish community. Throughout these changing times, though, Goldman notes persistent ambiguous feelings about the appropriate place of women in Judaism, even among reformers.

This account of the evolving religious identities of American Jewish women expands our understanding of women's religious roles and of the Americanization of Judaism in the nineteenth century; it makes an essential contribution to the history of religion in America.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Indiana Jewish Post & Opinion

Most worshipers in American synagogues (outside the Orthodox) may not remember the absence of women in their sanctuaries, but this wasn't always so...[Beyond the Synagogue Gallery] unfolds the history of the transformation in synagogue design and organization that shaped American Judaism.
— Jack Fischel

Jewish Chronicle

Karla Goldman's scholarly and well-researched book Beyond the Synagogue Gallery...was such a pleasure to read that not only did I take prolific notes while reading it, I also found myself laughing aloud at some of the quirks of synagogue life revealed in her exploration of the role of women in American Jewry...Her study exposes every major transformation of the American synagogue as being bound up with major redefinitions of the place of women in public and private life. She demonstrates that the emergence of women as a dominant presence in public worship began to define both the synagogue and American Jewish public life.
— Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild

American Jewish History

An important component of this interesting and well- written study is the author's decision to place this narrative within the larger context of the nineteenth- century American Jewish women, but because Goldman widely utilizes the plethora of excellent scholarship that describes and analyzes the gendered lives and activities of Protestant women and white middle-class society, she places her narrative within the larger context of American religious life in the nineteenth century.
— Carol K. Colburn

Indiana Jewish Post & Opinion - Jack Fischel
Most worshipers in American synagogues (outside the Orthodox) may not remember the absence of women in their sanctuaries, but this wasn't always so...[Beyond the Synagogue Gallery] unfolds the history of the transformation in synagogue design and organization that shaped American Judaism.
Jewish Chronicle - Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild
Karla Goldman's scholarly and well-researched book Beyond the Synagogue Gallery...was such a pleasure to read that not only did I take prolific notes while reading it, I also found myself laughing aloud at some of the quirks of synagogue life revealed in her exploration of the role of women in American Jewry...Her study exposes every major transformation of the American synagogue as being bound up with major redefinitions of the place of women in public and private life. She demonstrates that the emergence of women as a dominant presence in public worship began to define both the synagogue and American Jewish public life.
American Jewish History - Carol K. Colburn
An important component of this interesting and well- written study is the author's decision to place this narrative within the larger context of the nineteenth- century American Jewish women, but because Goldman widely utilizes the plethora of excellent scholarship that describes and analyzes the gendered lives and activities of Protestant women and white middle-class society, she places her narrative within the larger context of American religious life in the nineteenth century.
Jewish Chronicle
Karla Goldman's scholarly and well-researched book Beyond the Synagogue Gallery...was such a pleasure to read that not only did I take prolific notes while reading it, I also found myself laughing aloud at some of the quirks of synagogue life revealed in her exploration of the role of women in American Jewry...Her study exposes every major transformation of the American synagogue as being bound up with major redefinitions of the place of women in public and private life. She demonstrates that the emergence of women as a dominant presence in public worship began to define both the synagogue and American Jewish public life.
— Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild
American Jewish History
An important component of this interesting and well- written study is the author's decision to place this narrative within the larger context of the nineteenth- century American Jewish women, but because Goldman widely utilizes the plethora of excellent scholarship that describes and analyzes the gendered lives and activities of Protestant women and white middle-class society, she places her narrative within the larger context of American religious life in the nineteenth century.
— Carol K. Colburn
Indiana Jewish Post & Opinion
Most worshipers in American synagogues (outside the Orthodox) may not remember the absence of women in their sanctuaries, but this wasn't always so...[Beyond the Synagogue Gallery] unfolds the history of the transformation in synagogue design and organization that shaped American Judaism.
— Jack Fischel
Jack Fischel
Beyond the Synagogue Gallery unfolds the history of the transformation in synagogue design and organization that shaped American Judaism.
Indiana Jewish Post & Opinion
Sylvia Rothschild
[A] scholarly and well-researched book...[It] was such a pleasure to read...
Jewish Chronicle
Library Journal
Weaving together anecdotes with choice quotes from letters and newspapers, Goldman (American Jewish history, Hebrew Union Coll.) presents a thorough yet accessible historical study of women s growing participation in synagogue activities in the United States. Focusing on the 19th century, Goldman documents debates surrounding the Reform movement and examines architectural adjustments in U.S. synagogues. Further, she tells a triumphant story of Jewish women s organizations in enabling women s contributions. Goldman uniquely gathers these themes, contrasting with titles narrating general history of U.S. Jewish women, such as Joyce Antler s The Journey Home: How Jewish Women Shaped Modern America (LJ 4/1/97). Other titles emphasize religious leadership, like Pamela Nadell s Women Who Would Be Rabbis (LJ 11/1/98) or Miriam Peskowitz s Spinning Fantasies: Rabbis, Gender and History (Univ. of California, 1997). David Kaufman s Shul with a Pool: The Synagogue in American Jewish History (LJ 2/1/99) describes how the U.S. synagogue became a social and academic center. Although lacking an alphabetical bibliography to supplement endnotes, this work is recommended for academic libraries and large public libraries. Marianne Orme, West Lafayette, IN Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A thorough survey of the innovations introduced into the American synagogue in the 19th century by the Reform movement, focusing on the Jewish woman's gradual religious emancipation. Traditional Judaism delineates the woman's specific place in public worship, in particular prescribing the separation of the sexes during the service, proscribing female voices from joining in prayer, and, with a few exceptions, omitting any requirement that women attend the synagogue at all. These centuries-old arrangements did not jibe with the progressive ideas of gender equality espoused by the nascent Reform movement. Legitimizing a female presence in the synagogue was part of a larger project of the Reformist Jews, who wished to acquire a new American identity by making their public religious observance conform externally to the ways of their Protestant neighbors. Separate women's galleries were first replaced by mixed seating in 1851 (in an Albany synagogue), and a decade later many other temples introduced family pews, mirroring the custom of Christian churches. Men were relieved of the obligation to wear a prayer shawl and head covering, and a mixed choir and organ music were brought in, ostensibly for the sake of decorum. Other aspects of the reform included the use of vernacular instead of Hebrew, omission of the prayer for a messianic return to Zion, and even moving the holy day from Saturday to Sunday. By the end of the century, women were admitted as full members of the congregation, which first allowed their participation in synagogue administration and then in leading the worship itself. This process eventually led to the ordination of the first woman rabbi in 1972.Goldman'swell-researched book highlights one important premise: that the original steps on the road to women's religious liberation were initially taken by acculturated male Jews, who often indiscriminately copied Christian politics and aesthetics. An interesting and well-written study.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674007055
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 9/20/2001
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 0.60 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Karla Goldman is Historian in Residence, Jewish Women's Archive, Brookline, Massachusetts.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Women and the Synagogue

1 Jewish Women: Acculturation in Old and New Worlds

2 Women's Emergence in the Early American Synagogue Community

3 The Quest for Respectability: Mixed Choirs and Family Pews

4 The Trouble with Jewish Women

5 Women in the Reforming Synagogue: Resistance and Transformation

6 Kaufmann Kohler and the Ideal Jewish Woman

7 Beyond the Gallery: American Jewish Women in the 1890s

Epilogue: Twentieth-Century Resonances

Notes

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)