Beyond Uncle Tom's Cabin: Essays on the Writing of Harriet Beecher Stowe

Beyond Uncle Tom's Cabin: Essays on the Writing of Harriet Beecher Stowe

by Sylvia Mayer, Martin T. Buinicki, Jennifer Cognard-Black, Maria I. Diedrich
     
 

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Ever since feminist scholarship began to reintroduce Harriet Beecher Stowe's writings to the American Literary canon in the 1970s, critical interest in her work has steadily increased. Beyond Uncle Tom's Cabin: The Writings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, edited by Sylvia Mayer and Monika Mueller, shows that during her long writing and publishing career, Stowe was a highly… See more details below

Overview

Ever since feminist scholarship began to reintroduce Harriet Beecher Stowe's writings to the American Literary canon in the 1970s, critical interest in her work has steadily increased. Beyond Uncle Tom's Cabin: The Writings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, edited by Sylvia Mayer and Monika Mueller, shows that during her long writing and publishing career, Stowe was a highly prolific writer who targeted diverse audiences, dealt with drastically changing economic, commercial, and cultural contexts, and wrote in a diversity of genres.

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
"Literary criticism of Stowe's work consistently focuses on her masterpiece, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), and on themes immediate to that work—race, slavery, religion, and domesticity. In fact, Stowe wrote much more than just that one novel: she also penned The Pearl of Orr's Island (1862), Lady Byron Vindicated (1870), Pink and White Tyranny (1871), My Wife and I (1871), We and Our Neighbor (1875), Poganuc People (1878), and many more works. Mayer (Univ. of Bayreuth, Germany) and Mueller (Univ. of Stuttgart, Germany) seek to shift the scholarly conversation to these less-known works and provide other lenses through which to read Stowe. They succeed brilliantly. For example, the essays reveal that Stowe's works are relevant for transnational studies, for ecocriticism and environmentalism, for conceptualizing New England regionalism as important to national identity formation, and for forays into rhetorical studies. This volume demonstrates that focusing on Stowe's 'other' writings can open up new directions for Stowe studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty."
Choice
Literary criticism of Stowe's work consistently focuses on her masterpiece, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), and on themes immediate to that work—race, slavery, religion, and domesticity. In fact, Stowe wrote much more than just that one novel: she also penned The Pearl of Orr's Island (1862), Lady Byron Vindicated (1870), Pink and White Tyranny (1871), My Wife and I (1871), We and Our Neighbor (1875), Poganuc People (1878), and many more works. Mayer (Univ. of Bayreuth, Germany) and Mueller (Univ. of Stuttgart, Germany) seek to shift the scholarly conversation to these less-known works and provide other lenses through which to read Stowe. They succeed brilliantly. For example, the essays reveal that Stowe's works are relevant for transnational studies, for ecocriticism and environmentalism, for conceptualizing New England regionalism as important to national identity formation, and for forays into rhetorical studies. This volume demonstrates that focusing on Stowe's 'other' writings can open up new directions for Stowe studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781611470055
Publisher:
Fairleigh Dickinson University Press
Publication date:
04/01/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
254
File size:
1 MB

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