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Biblica: The Bible Atlas
     

Biblica: The Bible Atlas

3.5 7
by Prof. Barry J. Beitzel (Editor)
 

Heralded as the most authoritative and up-to-date atlas of the Bible now available, Biblica: The Bible Atlas with an enclosed CD-ROM goes beyond the more traditional books of its kind. It places the biblical narrative and its peoples in their historical, cultural, social, and geographic contexts, and it makes clear the complex history and cultures of

Overview


Heralded as the most authoritative and up-to-date atlas of the Bible now available, Biblica: The Bible Atlas with an enclosed CD-ROM goes beyond the more traditional books of its kind. It places the biblical narrative and its peoples in their historical, cultural, social, and geographic contexts, and it makes clear the complex history and cultures of the Bible lands as they relate to the regionÃ?'s modern social and political landscape. But perhaps most important of all, Biblica: The Bible Atlas incorporates the most recent archaeological findings and research, combining scholarly data with engaging discussion of the BibleÃ?'s immortal stories. In summary, this unusual volume offers readers fresher insights and a deeper appreciation of the biblical narrative than any other reference source of its kind. Biblica: The Bible Atlas is also a visually stunning guide to the Bible and biblical lands, featuring more than 650 full-color paintings, drawings, etchings, and photographs plus 125 full-color maps of the region. Following the extensive and beautifully illustrated main text are 14 pages of biblical reference tables, an extensive bibliography, a glossary of biblical terms, a large selection of biblical quotations from the Old and New Testaments, a gazetteer of biblical place names, and an extensive index. Here is a beautiful and informative book that will make a treasured addition to the family bookshelf. It will also be a much-sought-after volume in reference libraries everywhere.

(sidebar copy)
Biblica: The Bible Atlas

  • Brings to life the dramatic stories, charismatic people, and fascinating locales of the Bible
  • Arranged in eight parts: geography and history of the Bible lands; Genesis and the Patriarchal period; the Judges; the Kings, the Prophets and the Righteous; the conquest of the kingdoms; the life of Jesus of Nazareth; and the spreading of the Word
  • Includes information on topography, geology, climate, vegetation, and key physical features of the region
  • 125 original maps show prominent locations, journeys, battles, political boundaries, and more
  • Incorporates the latest archaeological findings and theological research.

    The enclosed CD-ROM presents interactive maps that point out biblical place names and important archaeological sites. This software accessory also defines biblical names and Bible-related terms, and serves readers as a helpful complement to a truly unusual book.

  • Editorial Reviews

    From the Publisher

    Ã?"Ã?â?¦The biggest book in the gift pile has to be Biblica: The Bible Atlas from BarronÃ?'s. An absolute steal at $50, this stone-tablet of a bookÃ?--650 full-color illustrations, 125 original mapsÃ?--is, at its subtitle says, Ã?'a social and historical journey through the lands of the Bible.Ã?' And it is full of surprises, such as pictures of oil derricks and even the Star of Bethlehem. This book is bound to be a favored holiday gift.Ã?"

    Ã?--Michael Coffey, PublisherÃ?'s Weekly, September 17, 2007

    Ã?"If ever there was a biblical reference tool that left the reader eagerly anticipating the visual feast on every page, it is the Bible Atlas known simply as Biblica. The work of Beitzel (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) and an impressive team of contributors, editors, and designers, the volume is an oversize work that seems more suited for a pedestal or a coffee table than the shelf of a library. It is the quality and the quantity of the artwork that allows Biblica to stand out among other Bible atlases currently on the market. Its surprising affordability makes this atlas a worthwhile reference purchase for most public libraries, including those that already have several Bible atlases in their collectionÃ?"

    Ã?--Wade Osburn, Booklist, January 15, 2008

    "Titanic Bible atlas..."

    Ã?--The Philadelphia Enquirer, Sunday, December 16, 2007

    "Biblica is a phenomenal work that incorporates the most recent archaeological findings and research, combining scholarly data with illuminating reference to the Bible's stories."

    Ã?--Scott Coffman, Louisville Courier Journal, Saturday, December 15, 2007

    "Ã?â?¦The biggest book in the gift pile has to be Biblica: The Bible Atlas from BarronÃ?â??Ã?'s. An absolute steal at $50.... This book is bound to be a favored holiday gift.Ã?â??Ã?"

    Ã?--Michael Coffey, PublisherÃ?â??Ã?'s Weekly, September 17, 2007

    "Biblica is a phenomenal work that incorporates the most recent archaeological findings and research, combining scholarly data with illuminating reference to the Bible's stories. It features more than 650 photos and illustrations plus 125 full-color maps of the region. Its extensive bibliography, gazetteer and numerous other reference materials make this a must-have for anyone with an interest in the Bible and its history."

    Ã?--Scott Coffman, Louisville Courier Journal, Saturday, December 15, 2007

    "Titanic Bible atlas, 575 gorgeous oversized pages, that takes you back to biblical lands as they looked back when, with context and useful tools galore."

    Ã?--The Philadelphia Enquirer, Sunday, December 16, 2007

    From the article Ã?"A grump looks for the happiest placesÃ?"

    Ã?"Biblica: The Bible Atlas. This awesomely ambitious atlas is accurately touted as Ã?'a social and historical journey through the lands of the Bible.Ã?' It is truly heavy, weighing in at more than 9 pounds. The 578-page volume is a visual and educational treasure, lavishly illustrated with 650 full-color pictures of art - paintings, drawings, etchings, sculptures - and scenic photographs, plus 125 maps of important places, journeys, battles, political demarcations and more; meticulously compiled by an international team of writers, distinguished academics and Bible scholars. With this atlas in hand, we gain a deeper understanding of the lay of the land.Ã?"

    Ã?-- Spencer Rumsey, Newsday, February 10, 2008

    From the article Ã?â??Ã?"Bible-inspired gift books bring meaning to the holidaysÃ?â??Ã?"

    "Tracing ancient steps"

    Ã?"For people who are not biblical scholars and who have not traveled to the area where the Bible stories took place, itÃ?â??Ã?'s sometimes hard to visualize exactly where these events occurred in relation to todayÃ?â??Ã?'s world. Biblica:The Bible Atlas, by Barry J. Beitzel,

    Professor of Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, is a massive and eautiful volume that places the Bible in geographical context.

    "From the Garden of Eden and the flood through the great judges,kings and prophets, the life of Jesus and how the word spread after his death,Biblica details the history of Christianity through maps, works of art and text. A section on the geography and history of biblical lands pinpoints the locations of significant events and explains what life might have been like in those places during biblical times.

    "Tables of the books of the Bible, the judges, prophets, kings, Egyptian rulers, apostles, even JesusÃ?â??Ã?' wondrous acts and the gospels in which they are located, as well as a glossary and Bible family trees, give readers a quick reference for details or a fascinating basis for browsing. Biblica is a complete education in the Bible and will illuminate any readerÃ?'s experience of the ancient text."
    Ã?--Linda Stankard, Book Page , December 2007

    "Ã?â?¦The biggest book in the gift pile has to be Biblica: The Bible Atlas from Barron's. An absolute steal at $50, this stone-tablet of a bookÃ?--650 full-color illustrations, 125 original mapsÃ?--is, at its subtitle saysÃ?â?? Ã?'a social and historical journey through the lands of the Bible.' And it is full of surprises, such as pictures of oil derricks and even the Star of Bethlehem. This book is bound to be a favored holiday gift.Ã?â??Ã?"
    Ã?--Michael Coffey, Publisher's Weekly, September 17, 2007

    From the Ã?â??Ã?"LJXpress Special Edition: Reference 2008Ã?â??Ã?" e-blast newsletter

    Ã?"It's hefty, but it's worth its weight. Handsomely produced, intensely informative, it's much more than an atlas. But let's start with the maps: there are 125 of them, far more than in recent offerings from Oxford or National Geographic. Almost all are physical maps and all are in color. Ranging from a full- to one-quarter-page in size, they often note terrain and, variously, climate, vegetation, and other criteria. Each labels the sites relevant to the related discussion (e.g., "Origins of the Judges of Israel"), and many offer small boxed pointers to the locations of particular biblical characters/narratives, (e.g., "Philip meets an Ethiopian eunuch....")

    Ã?"Readers and browsers will feast on 650 color art photos across the same size range as the maps and including far more than the usual Old and New Testament subjects. There are eight main sections: "Geography and History of Bible Lands" is followed by five sections tracing the Old Testament and its social, historical, physical, and archaeological context. Then come "The Life of Jesus of Nazareth" and "Spreading the Word." An early section acknowledges the "intermingling of history and faith," the very matter that can send mixed messages when contributors include a mix of theologians, historians, and archaeologistsÃ?--26 contributors in total under editor Beitzel's oversight.

    Ã?"On the whole, this book succeeds handsomely, especially for the informed lay reader, in treading that ground shared by history and faith. The OT is handled both as a Jewish text and a predictor of Jesus' coming. For the NT, Jesus and his disciples similarly are arrayed across earthly and resurrection considerations. The back matter contains "Bible References," e.g., tables of rulers and their dates; a bibliography, subdivided by the atlas's main sections (there are no web sources); a glossary; 12 pages of "Scripture References" to specifically quoted and not simply mentioned portions; a gazetteer, which is a geographical index rather than a geographical dictionary; and the index proper. Quotes throughout come from The New Oxford Annotated Bible, New Standard Revised Version (2001). BOTTOM LINE: Given its size, this tome is absolutely ideal for library reference sections, where it will serveÃ?--even inspireÃ?--a broad array of readers, from biblical studies newcomer to the more informed, whether or not believers. Highly recommended for high school, public, and academic libraries."
    Ã?--Margaret Heilbrun,Library Journal and libraryjournal.com, November 19, 2007

    Library Journal

    It's hefty, but it's worth its weight. Handsomely produced and intensely informative, it's much more than an atlas. But let's start with the maps: there are 125 of them, far more than in recent offerings from Oxford or National Geographic. Almost all are physical maps, and all are in color. Ranging from a quarter to a full page in size, they often note terrain and, variously, climate, vegetation, and other criteria. Each labels the sites relevant to the related discussion (e.g., "Origins of the Judges of Israel"), and many offer small boxed pointers to the locations of particular biblical characters/narratives, e.g., "Philip meets an Ethiopian eunuch . . . ." Missing, however, are chapter:verse citations. Readers and browsers will feast on 650 color art photos that include far more than the usual Old and New Testament subjects, though the book remains within the Old and New Testament worlds, i.e., there is no discussion of other evolving religions. There are eight main sections: "Geography and History of Bible Lands" is followed by five sections tracing the Old Testament and its social, historical, physical, and archaeological context. Then comes "The Life of Jesus of Nazareth" and "Spreading the Word." An early section acknowledges the "intermingling of history and faith," the very matter that can send mixed messages when contributors include a mix of theologians, historians, and archaeologists-26 contributors altogether working under Beitzel (OT & Semitic languages, Trinity Evangelical Divinity Sch.). On the whole, this book succeeds handsomely, especially for the informed lay reader, in treading that ground shared by history and faith. The OT is handled both as a Jewish text anda predictor of Jesus's coming. For the NT, Jesus and his disciples similarly are arrayed across earthly and resurrection considerations. Quotes throughout come from The New Oxford Annotated Bible, New Standard Revised Version(2001).
    —Margaret Heilbrun

    Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9780764160851
    Publisher:
    Barron's Educational Series, Incorporated
    Publication date:
    10/01/2007
    Pages:
    578
    Product dimensions:
    10.34(w) x 13.30(h) x 2.16(d)

    Related Subjects

    Meet the Author


    Barry J. Beitzel is Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, Illinois.

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    Biblica: The Bible Atlas 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    it is full of amazing pictures but the authors' attitudes towards God and the bible seem very doubtful and even demeaning. Instead of taking the bible as truth and backing it up with other historical documents they take all other historians at their word and then if it is in line with the bible they say that the bible is plausible. i would assume mostly Christians are buying this book and it is  upsetting to see the lack of faith. also they use the abbreviations BCE and CE, it may seem minor but someone who is doing this  much research on the bible shouldn't care so much about being politically correct.  
    CCD-dave More than 1 year ago
    The art work is wonderful. The size of it may make it a bit impractical to use frequently, but it is usable.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    If you enjoy history, if you enjoy learning about Bible times, if you enjoy learning about other cultures...you MUST GET THIS BOOK! The only reason I gave it 4 stars for "bedside" is due to size of book - it's larger than the average bedside book.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    Swiderek More than 1 year ago
    Like many I owned a Bible and never read it. It made for a great, but little used, reference book because I couldn't "relate" to all those ancient places no one ever heard of or knew where they were. I guess I was afraid to read it. This wonderful book puts all those fears at ease. I'd recommend anyone --- Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Muslim, Agnostic --- wishing to know more about the Bible to read this book first before they tackled the "Bible". The author has arranged things beautifully and simply. One knows exactly where and when things happened in the Bible. The text is easy to read, and the pictures are great. The maps are one of the best parts. After reading this atlas, one will not only --- NOT BE AFRAID --- to read any version of the Bible, but they will have confidence and will want to do so for they will be able to identify with those places. This book "reassures" one that those true events in the Bible did, indeed, really happen. And this is where they did. And where in history in ancient times that they did. And if one gets lost, they can always refer back to this book and those maps. One thing I took offense to, as a Christian, was the use of the "modern term" of B.C.E. (Before The Common Era) and C.E. (The Common Era). It disturbed me until I realized that B.C.E. is an acronym that really stands for ... BEFORE THE "CHRISTIAN" ERA. Then it dawned om me that C.E. can mean one thing and "one thing" only. And that is that our "modern world for the past 2000 plus years" is now, and has been for two millenia, in ... THE "CHRISTIAN" ERA. So, B.C.E. and C.E. are better terms for this being "The Christian Era" than those obsolete ones of B.C. and A.D. Whoever came up with B.C.E. and C.E. ought to applaud him or herself! Kudos to ... YOU!
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    Guest More than 1 year ago
    Fabulous, beautiful, a must buy. Takes you on a journey you don't want to miss.