Big Bad Bunny
  • Big Bad Bunny
  • Big Bad Bunny

Big Bad Bunny

5.0 1
by Franny Billingsley, G. Brian Karas
     
 

At home,
in the Mouse House,
Baby Boo-Boo gets no respect.

Just look at her name:
Baby Boo-Boo.

She's no baby!

The word drives her wild in a big, bad way.

And here's Mama Mouse calling, always calling after her,

"Baby! Where are you, Baby?"

It's humiliating.
Mice (and other small persons)

…  See more details below

Overview

At home,
in the Mouse House,
Baby Boo-Boo gets no respect.

Just look at her name:
Baby Boo-Boo.

She's no baby!

The word drives her wild in a big, bad way.

And here's Mama Mouse calling, always calling after her,

"Baby! Where are you, Baby?"

It's humiliating.
Mice (and other small persons)
will understand what
Big Bad Boo-Boo does.

It's quite naughty.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

At first glance, Big Bad Bunny seems like a creature that haunts the dreams of sleeping children: Fearlessly crossing "mucky swamps" and "rushing streams" ("Big Bad Bunny can go anywhere"), the monster has furiously knitted eyebrows, razor-sharp talons and knifelike teeth. But Big Bad Bunny is actually Baby Boo-Boo, the third child of sweet Mama Mouse. Dressed in a bunny suit, the little mouse has run away. Mama Mouse, however, is less meek and dainty than she appears; thoroughly undaunted by swamps and the rest (she "will go anywhere for Baby Boo-Boo"), she pursues and tames the ferocious Big Bad Bunny - with no loss of face on her child's part. In her first picture book, Billingsley (Well Wished) extends her plot with satisfying onomatopoeia; the oversize format, too, marks this for a readaloud. Karas (Muncha! Muncha! Muncha!) strategically deploys mixed-media to render the id-gone-wild scenes with comic abandon, often ramping up the mouse's Sturm und Drang so that it energizes an entire spread. The slyly delicate portraits of Mama Mouse, meanwhile, both articulate and defuse the fear that a parent may wither in the face of a child's emotional turmoil. Together, Karas and Billingsley walk the fine line between empathy and comedy. They grant Baby Boo-Boo and her alter ego the right to act out, at the same time assuring readers that there will always be a place for them at home. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
AGERANGE: Ages 3 to 6.

Big Bad Bunny appears to be big and bad indeed, with his long sharp claws, his pointy yellow teeth, and his loud angry roars. Quiet soothing pictures of Mama Mouse tucking her babies in for naps are interspersed with the frightening images of Big Bad Bunny--until Mama Mouse reaches the bed of Baby Boo-Boo. Baby Boo-Boo is missing! Mama Mouse rushes into the forest. Big Bad Bunny can go anywhere and Mama Mouse can follow him. They splat through marshes and grasses. They splish over streams. They traverse tangly bushes. Suddenly, Big Bad Bunny stops. He is lost. Mama Mouse hears her own Baby Boo-Boo howling in the distance. When she finds him in his bunny costume, Baby Boo-Boo tells her very loudly that he is no longer a baby. Mama Mouse understands. She takes his small paw in her own and they walk home. Mama Mouse tucks Big Bad Bunny aka Baby Boo-Boo into his bed. The expressive illustrations could almost tell the story by themselves. Full-page pictures exhibiting strong emotions of anger and frustration are softened with vignettes showing the love and concern of a mother for her child. A good choice for preschool storytimes. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.

School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1- Big Bad Bunny is fierce, with long sharp claws and pointy yellow teeth. Nothing can stop her-not a rushing stream, a mucky swamp, not even "thick, tangly bushes.... Big Bad Bunny can go anywhere." Glimpses of this fearsome creature alternate with scenes of Mama Mouse putting her babies to bed. When she discovers that one is missing, she goes off in search of her little one. She, too, crosses through the stream, the swamp, and the bushes, for "Mama Mouse will go anywhere for Baby Boo-Boo." Then she hears a howling: Big Bad Bunny has finally been stopped by a steep hill and the realization that she's lost. Mama Mouse is thrilled to find Baby Boo-Boo, even as the youngster shouts that she's not a baby, she's Big Bad Bunny. Mama plays along and they walk home hand-in-hand. Readers can now see that Big Bad Bunny is a mouse in a bunny costume. The illustrations, set against creamy pages, are done in gouache and acrylic with pencil. Karas uses exaggerated features and bright background colors to make the close-ups of Big Bad Bunny quite menacing. But as the book progresses, her scariness erodes until she's back at home in her mouse bed. This is a perfect choice for children who have felt big and bad one minute, and in need of their mothers the next.-Ieva Bates, Ann Arbor District Library, MI

Kirkus Reviews
Opening with a point-counterpoint exchange, readers first meet terrifying Big Bad Bunny then see the nurturing Mouse House where Mama's going through comforting naptime rituals with her children. Visual and textual contrapositions build exquisitely till Mama discovers Baby Boo-Boo missing from her wee bed ("EEK!") and sets off determinedly to find her. Midway through the story comes the big reveal: Big Bad Bunny is in fact Baby Boo-Boo clad in bunny-wear. Mama leads the lost toddler safely home with assurances of love. The narrative structure includes three repetitive treks through river, swamp and bushes, including swell sound effects. Karas's Big Bad Bunny, depicted with fearsome Groucho-like eyebrows, yellow fangs, pink polka-dotted pajamas and bunny slippers, is both scary and cute. This books works on every level: narrative arc, patterning, graphic-design elements (cue delighted dramatic reader), pacing, illustrations that express the comic mood and natural movement of the story. Underlying the sly fun is a Mama who knows her stuff. (Picture book. 3-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416906018
Publisher:
Atheneum/Richard Jackson Books
Publication date:
02/19/2008
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
792,023
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

G. Brian Karas has illustrated many children’s books, including Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! And Tippy-Tippy-Tippy, Hide! by Candace Fleming; Incredible Me by Kathi Appelt; the High-Rise Private Eyes series by Cynthia Rylant; and Ivan by Catherine Applegate, which was a New York Times bestseller. His books have been named ALA Notables, Booklist Editor Choices, SLJ Best Books, and Boston Globe Horn Book Honor books. He lives in upstate New York. Visit him online at GBrianKaras.com.

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Big Bad Bunny 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
NicosMomma More than 1 year ago
My son loves this book. This book has a few lines that repeat themselves like "what's that noise?" and then the response is the sound like ROAR or SCRITCH. My son repeats these lines and sounds to me later laughing :) Great story for little ones and older kids that suffer from being the "baby".