×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Big Bear Hug
     

Big Bear Hug

3.6 6
by Nicholas Oldland
 

See All Formats & Editions

A huge bear is wandering through the forest - but wait a minute! Who's that he's hugging? A beaver? And a moose? And a bird? And a tree?

Welcome to the world of Big Bear Hug, a contemporary fable about a bear who has an appetite for hugging everything in sight - even creatures that bears have been known to eat. One day, the benevolent bear meets up with a

Overview

A huge bear is wandering through the forest - but wait a minute! Who's that he's hugging? A beaver? And a moose? And a bird? And a tree?

Welcome to the world of Big Bear Hug, a contemporary fable about a bear who has an appetite for hugging everything in sight - even creatures that bears have been known to eat. One day, the benevolent bear meets up with a human. This human proceeds to do something the bear cannot understand: he raises his axe and begins to cut down a tree. Suddenly the bear doesn't feel like hugging anymore and must make a difficult decision on how to stop this destruction in his forest.

The environmental message of Big Bear Hug is both funny and powerful, while simple enough to engage very young children and show them the awesome power of a hug.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
... an attractive and appealing book.—Quill & Quire

This debut is a treat for the tree hugger in all of us.—Kirkus Reviews

Oldland's rustic-styled digital artwork looks like a hip flannel pajama print ... and his pictures play sly comic foil to the earnest text.—Publishers Weekly

... the book's quick humor makes it easy to embrace.—School Library Journal

Quill & Quire
... an attractive and appealing book.
Publishers Weekly
Recast Ferdinand the bull as a bear living in the North Woods, with hugs filling in for flower sniffing—that’s a workable summation of this debut effort. While the ursine hero may look like a hulking beast, he’s actually “so filled with love and happiness” that he gives out hugs wherever he goes—whether the recipient asked for one or not (“He even hugged creatures that bears have been known to eat”). And even more than hugging animals, the bear loves to hug trees. But when a woodsman threatens “one of the tallest, oldest, and most beautiful trees in the forest,” will the bear revert to type? Oldland’s rustic-styled digital artwork looks like a hip flannel pajama print (which is probably no coincidence, given that he’s creative director at an apparel company), and his pictures play sly comic foil to the earnest text. Ages 3–7. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
"There once was a bear so filled with love and happiness that whenever he roamed the forest and came across another living thing, he would give it a hug." He hugs creatures large and small, smelly or scary, but he loves all kinds of trees most of all. One day he sees a man with an ax admiring a tree. To his horror, he sees the man begin to chop. Angry, he begins to bite him, but he just cannot. So he does what he does best, he hugs him. The astounded man runs away, and of course the bear hugs the tree. "The tree felt much better." Photoshop images in mostly greens and browns are ultra simple, without details or textures. Only the bear and the man are active. Attractive page designs combine the many trees, distant mountains, and cloudy skies as settings for this unusual bear and the implied lesson of non-violence, conservation, and general good feeling. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—"There once was a bear so filled with love and happiness that whenever he roamed the forest and came across another living thing, he would give it a hug." The joke follows when a page turn reveals a shocked and terrified bunny caught up in his big arms. The sweet but deadpan text paired with the almost slapstick cartoon art makes for an entertaining conservation story. This large, lovable, dopey-looking bear loves hugging trees—all kinds of trees—most of all. When he observes a man staring up at one, he thinks he has found a kindred spirit—until the man takes a swing with his axe. The completely enraged animal must then find a way to stay true to himself and save the tree. Flat illustrations done in Photoshop feature simple shapes in blues, greens, and browns with plenty of white space. While ultimately the message here is a little heavy-handed, the book's quick humor makes it easy to embrace.—Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA
Kirkus Reviews
A big black bear is so full of love and happiness that he hugs every living thing he encounters: "No animal was too big . . . / Too small . . . / Too smelly . . . / Or too scary to hug." His favorite things to hug, however, are trees of all types and sizes. One day he sees a big man with an axe staring at a stately tree. At first black bear thinks the man loves trees as much as he does. When black bear realizes the man's intention, he tries to attack; but he can't. Instead " . . . he decided to do what he did best"-that is, hug-with predictable (and entirely acceptable) results. Canadian commercial artist Oldland's full-bleed and spot illustrations created in Photoshop have the look of woodcut prints except for the woodsman, who stands out from nature because of his heavy black outline. The startled animals on the receiving end of the Little Orphan Annie-eyed black bear's hugs will incite giggles. This debut is a treat for the tree hugger in all of us. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781554534647
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
09/28/2009
Series:
Life in the Wild Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
240,877
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 8.32(h) x 0.32(d)
Lexile:
AD610L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Nicholas Oldland earned a degree in fine arts at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick, Canada, and enjoyed success as a commercial artist and filmmaker before taking up the role of creative director at Hatley, a popular apparel company. Big Bear Hug is his first picture book.

Nicholas Oldland earned a degree in fine arts at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick, Canada, and enjoyed success as a commercial artist and filmmaker before taking up the role of creative director at Hatley, a popular apparel company. Big Bear Hug is his first picture book.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Big Bear Hug 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
MicheleLeesBookLove More than 1 year ago
Big Bear Hug is a short picture book with an environmental theme about a bear who loves his woods so much he hugs everything (and everyone) in them. One day he comes upon a person cutting down a tree and is faced with a dilemma of how best to defend his forest (he is a bear after all). While this is, literally, a "tree-hugging" book in the end I thought it was far more about individualism and being true to yourself, keeping the green message clear, but not hitting readers over the head with it, or with guilt. It's cute too, and easily charmed both my children. Good for libraries that might need a variety of themes, or parents who want to teach care of the environment without taking too hard of a line, or for kids who love animals. Big Bear Hug is one of the better quality books out there, in both content and illustrations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ftryfyfygyfyfyfyfyfygygygygygugyguvuvuvuvubhvtctctc
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
Imagine being filled with so much love that you hugged everything around you, even the things that you usually ate. That is what bear does. He hugs everything including a little bird, a big moose, a long snake; I think you understand how much love bear has. Bears favorite things to hug are trees, lots of trees of different sizes and varieties. All is well until one day a man carrying a axe grabs the attention of bear never the forest. Bear believes the man loves trees too until he starts to destroy the tree. Bear can’t hug the man as he’s too angry but what can bear do? You’ll love the surprise happy ending and so will the kids. I enjoyed the font style and size for this picture book; bold, black and stylish. The pictures are terrific and I love the animal’s eyes. The look of astonishment on some of the animals faces, just make you smile. You have to love black bear, he truly is adorable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pippen More than 1 year ago
This book was highly recommended at the holidays. I got it for my grandchildren, but it really did not catch our interests. It jumped around a lot and was not one they would like me to reread to them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I FARTED WHEN YOU CLICKED!