A Big Boy Now

A Big Boy Now

by Eileen Spinelli, Megan Lloyd
     
 

From getting dressed all by himself to making his own bed and helping Dad wash the car, this little bunny is certainly a big boy now. But riding his bike without training wheels? That might just prove too difficult.

Young readers will cheer for and relate to the little bunny who learns that no matter how big and grown up you are, you are never too old to go to

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Overview

From getting dressed all by himself to making his own bed and helping Dad wash the car, this little bunny is certainly a big boy now. But riding his bike without training wheels? That might just prove too difficult.

Young readers will cheer for and relate to the little bunny who learns that no matter how big and grown up you are, you are never too old to go to Mom for some help . . . and a hug.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Nicole Peterson Davis
This little bunny is growing up and he is a big boy now. He can get dressed by himself, make his own bed, and even pour his own cereal. The first section of this book talks about all the things this bunny can do because he is a big boy now. Then, he decided to take the training wheels off of his bike, and when he tried to ride his bike he fell down and was hurt. He went into his mother to get kisses and hugs and band aids, but he felt sad that he was not a big boy any more. His mother assured him that even his dad comes into her when he is hurting. The bunny was still a big boy. So, he tried to ride his bike once again. This book is perfect for boys who need a little more self-confidence and that growing up is a good thing to do. The book might also be helpful for the young boys who are learning to ride a bike and having trouble with balance and getting back onto the bicycle after they have fallen off. The illustrations are beautiful. Reviewer: Nicole Peterson Davis
School Library Journal
PreS-K—A proud bunny tells of all the things he has learned to do on his own, such as swing high, help his father wash the car, and share his scooter with a friend. However, trying to grow up a bit too fast, the young rabbit removes the training wheels from his bicycle and encounters some difficulties. After falling off the unsteady bike and getting soothed by a bandage, a kiss, and a reassuring talk with his mother, he considers putting the training wheels back on. After mulling it over, he decides to leave them off and slowly practices learning to ride his bike without assistance. His success adds another "big boy" skill to his growing repertoire of accomplishments. Children will be pleased with the young bunny's achievement.—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
Spinelli and Lloyd celebrate the self-confidence that arises from a child's achieving the milestones of growth, including the ups and downs of riding a bike sans training wheels. With a little bunny narrating, the first half of the book focuses on all the things he can do now that he is a big boy. From getting dressed and doing chores to feats of skill on the playground and being kind, he certainly does seem to be maturing. And parents are sure to appreciate the things Spinelli highlights: cleaning up after himself, pitching in and especially putting others first--his guest gets the first turn, he is a good sport and he shares with his little sister. The second half of the book describes the bunny's bumpy road to learning to ride a two-wheeler. He starts off well enough, but a wobble leads to a fall and some skinned appendages. A pep talk from Mom soothes his bruised self-confidence, while some practice helps him to success. Created with scratchboard and a spring palette of watercolors, Lloyd's bunny characters are exuberant and upbeat. And while their range of emotions is rather limited (the bunny smiles even when washing dishes and making his bed), they successfully convey both pride and self-confidence. A nice addition to the "growing up" books that not only deals with an obstacle to overcome, but features a main character that is slightly older than most in this genre. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060086732
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/31/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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