Big Bug Surprise

Big Bug Surprise

4.0 1
by Julia Gran
     
 


Think DIARY OF A WORM meets OLIVIA....
Introducing Prunella--an irresistibly irrepressible, independent, bug-loving little girl, sure to create quite a buzz!

Prunella is aflutter to share her big bug surprise at show-and-tell. But suddenly, the classroom is abuzz with an even bigger bug surprise! A swarm of bees has invaded! With her teacher and her

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Overview


Think DIARY OF A WORM meets OLIVIA....
Introducing Prunella--an irresistibly irrepressible, independent, bug-loving little girl, sure to create quite a buzz!

Prunella is aflutter to share her big bug surprise at show-and-tell. But suddenly, the classroom is abuzz with an even bigger bug surprise! A swarm of bees has invaded! With her teacher and her classmates frantic, can Prunella's buggy know-how save the day? Luckily, Prunella has an idea. And like a true queen, she leads the bees safely to a new hive. Her teacher is impressed! Her classmates cheer! But what does Prunella do? She shares more bug facts, of course, and her audience couldn't beeeee more delighted.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Pint-size Prunella is the authority on all things insect in this delightful paper-over-board volume. Gran (Princess Penelope) draws Prunella herself with massive bug eyes, wing-like arms, a ladybug dress and hair ribbons that protrude like antennae. The heroine inhabits a room outfitted with a variety of buggy furnishings (a bee-shaped clock, a chair with a back resembling a ladybug) and home to many winged and six-legged creatures (an ant farm and, in the book's denouement, a dung beetle). Not surprisingly, no one seems to have the time-or the inclination-to share in Prunella's interest. But when she finally gets her moment in the sun (involving a homeless colony of bees), Prunella offers a solution that saves the day. Finally, she gets what she was hoping for: an appreciative audience. Gran nicely portrays a heroine whose passion is its own reward. Ages 4-8. (Feb.) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Kristin Harris
Prunella loves insects. She has quite a menagerie in her room. Today she is busy trying to decide which of her insects she will take to school for show-and-tell. She tries to share her knowledge and enthusiasm for insects with her parents, but they are reading the morning paper and just cant be bothered. She tries to talk to the bus driver about dragonflies, but he is busy driving. Even Ms. Mantis wants her to wait until show-and-tell to see what she has brought to school. Prunella must wait and wait until it is her turn. Just as she is about to come to the front of the class a bug flies in the window. It is a queen bee and Prunella knows that a queen bee never flies alone. Here come a swarm of bees flying into the classroom. Ms. Mantis and the students panic when they see all of those bees. Prunella quickly grabs her jelly sandwich, wraps herself in a sheet and leads the bees outside. She takes them to a tree that is perfect for their new hive. Now everyone is interested in listening to what Prunella has to say about insects. She has a chance to show off the insect she brought to class, a dung beetle. Prunella tells her classmates that they are natures pooper-scoopers. The students are really grossed out, but of course want Prunella to tell them more.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3
Prunella knows a lot about bugs, but no one has time to listen—not her parents, the bus driver, or her teacher. She waits patiently for her turn at show-and-tell only to have a swarm of bees invade her classroom. When everyone else runs away, the quick-thinking child covers herself with a white sheet and leads the swarm to a new hive, all the while explaining the behavior of the insects. With peace restored, she wins the undivided attention of her classmates with her dung beetle, one of "nature's pooper-scoopers." Gran uses watercolors, dark outlines, and a cartoon style to bring Prunella's story to life. While her teacher and classmates sometimes fade into a monochromatic background, the girl stands out, resembling the bugs she loves. Her wispy hair, tied with red ribbons on either side of her large head, resembles spider legs. Her sleeves might be dragonfly wings, her skirt could be a ladybug, and her stockings are the black and yellow stripes of bee bodies. Reminiscent of Megan McDonald's Insects Are My Life (Scholastic, 1995), this book enlightens and informs with tidbits of information and a fact sheet. It's a clever introduction to entomology.
—Mary Jean SmithCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439676090
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
AD610L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Big Bug Surprise 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I received this book as a gift from the hospital after giving birth to my son. My son is 21 months old and loves this book as everyone in my family does. At first, I wasn't too fond of the drawings, but I grew to love the quirkiness. The story is simple but great! The subject is very easy to relate to. I love how the events turn out at the end. It is also informative (about bugs) in a nice way which makes it extra fun to read.