Big Law

( 5 )

Overview

When former cop Phil Broker's naïve ex-wife, Caren, blows the whistle on her feckless second husband, Keith Angland, a St. Paul cop making a cool $2 million moonlighting for the Chicago mob, she unwittingly signs her own death warrant. Unwisely for Caren, she not only shared her troubles with Broker, she also told Tom James, a reporter with fantasies of pulling off the perfect crime. Inspired by the $2 million payoff she entrusted to his safekeeping, Tom kills Caren in a brilliant frame-up that leaves her crooked...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback)
$7.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (47) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $3.50   
  • Used (41) from $1.99   
The Big Law

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

When former cop Phil Broker's naïve ex-wife, Caren, blows the whistle on her feckless second husband, Keith Angland, a St. Paul cop making a cool $2 million moonlighting for the Chicago mob, she unwittingly signs her own death warrant. Unwisely for Caren, she not only shared her troubles with Broker, she also told Tom James, a reporter with fantasies of pulling off the perfect crime. Inspired by the $2 million payoff she entrusted to his safekeeping, Tom kills Caren in a brilliant frame-up that leaves her crooked cop-husband to take the fall.

Covering all the angles, Tom runs to the FBI — "the Big Law" — and wangles a new life in the Witness Protection Program. But Tom's perfect plan doesn't count on Broker. Hard-edged and relentless, Broker smells a rat and is determined to set things right. But to succeed, he's got to locate Tom — a clever man with a new identity, a suitcase full of cash, and the Big Law on his side.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Entertainment Weekly
As character-driven a thriller as you're likely to find. Logan makes strong use of his setting, a Minnesota as physically and spirtually glacial as The Ice Storm's Connecticut wasteland...[a] story of the chilling desperation that turns a normal heart to crime.
Bookman Book Review
This fascinating account of how the government program operates and its vulnerabilities will entice the reader with its multiple layers of intrigue and dilemmas.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Readers will be hanging on to theedge of their seats until the final page.
Minneapolis Star-Tribune
[A] thoroughly engaging page-turner...Logan has perfected his penchant for delivering a surprise punch.
Chicago Tribune
One of the best new thriller writers is back with a twisty offering involving bad cops, ex-wives, sleazy newspaper reporters and the witness-protection program...that leave[s] readers on the edge of their seats. If he were a boxer, he'd be a heavyweight, and definitely a contender.
MAXIM Magazine
[A] taut thriller...Logan's graphic style and knowledge of FBI inner workings (reminiscent of Tom Clancy's, though not so damned techno-geeky) raise it well above the genre standard.
Minneapolis Star Tribune
[Chuck] Logan demonstrates his ability to create the appealing and appalling characters essential for conflict in the thriller genre. He has also perfected his penchant for delivering a surprise punch. The Big Law proves that he richly deserves the accolades he received for his earlier thrillers, The Price of Blood and Hunter's Moon
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Readers will be hanging on to theedge of their seats until the final page.
Minneapolis Star-Tribune
[A] thoroughly engaging page-turner. . . Logan has perfected his penchant for delivering a surprise punch.
Chicago Tribune
One of the best new thriller writers is back with a twisty offering involving bad cops, ex-wives, sleazy newspaper reporters and the witness-protection program. . . that leave[s] readers on the edge of their seats. If he were a boxer, he'd be a heavyweight, and definitely a contender.
Charles Jaco
Chuck Logan is a remarkably good writer...not only gives us a miserable villain etched in acid, he gives us writing with flashes of brilliance...[I] couldn't put this book down. -- USA Today
Minneapolis Star Tribune
[Chuck] Logan demonstrates his ability to create the appealing and appalling characters essential for conflict in the thriller genre. He has also perfected his penchant for delivering a surprise punch. The Big Law proves that he richly deserves the accolades he received for his earlier thrillers, The Price of Blood and Hunter's Moon.
St. Paul Pioneer
[An] intricate thriller...an enjoyable mix of action and suspense with characters who hold up. A psychological study of how fantasies can go wrong.
MAXIM Magazine
[A] taut thriller...Logan's graphic style and knowledge of FBI inner workings (reminiscent of Tom Clancy's, though not so damned techno-geeky) raise it well above the genre standard.
Bookman Book Review
This fascinating account of how the government program operates and its vulnerabilities will entice the reader with its multiple layers of intrigue and dilemmas.
Kirkus Reviews
A crackerjack thriller and a second appearance for Phil Broker (The Price of Blood, 1997), tough ex-cop, hard-bitten Vietnam vet, and serious daddy.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061096877
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/28/2003
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 797,209
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Chuck Logan is the author of eight novels, including After the Rain, Vapor Trail, Absolute Zero, and The Big Law. He is a veteran of the Vietnam War who lives in Stillwater, Minnesota, with his wife and daughter.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

December 11; 11:33 a.m.

The box came in the UPS morning delivery at the rear entrance of the Warren E. Burger Federal Building at the corner of Kellogg and Robert, in downtown St. Paul. It measured eighteen inches by sixteen inches, and was six inches deep. It weighed about twelve pounds. A red label slapped diagonal to the address announced: CONTENTS REFRIGERATED. A retired cop in a security company blazer manned the guard station. He placed the box on the X-ray machine belt.

First, the label caught his attention.

Then the quilt of mismatched stamps. And the address: "For FBI Special Agent Lorn Garrison"--like real personal. And the office number of a federal and local joint task force investigating narcotics traffic in the county; it was an office number not given out to the public. Very alert now, he ran the box and focused on his video monitor.

He was trained to look for five objects inside packages: detonators, power sources, switches, chemicals, and wires that connected them.

He saw shapes in the monitor screen that could be all five. He stopped the conveyor, picked up his phone, and alerted the main security office. In a calm forceful voice, he ordered everyone in the immediate area to exit the building.

People spilled into the intersection of Jackson and Fourth Streets, among them a supervisor in the IRS offices. He'd heard someone at the guard station say the word bomb. So he called his office on his cell phone and said, "I think there's a bomb." Other office workers lined up to use his cell phone and notify their offices.

In sixty seconds the stairwells thundered with people whoseimaginations thundered with visions of Oklahoma City. There was still no official order to evacuate. Hundreds of federal employees were now out stamping in the cold on Jackson, Fourth, and Robert Streets and on Kellogg Boulevard.

A photographer for the St. Paul paper, returning from an assignment, drove down Fourth Street, got stuck in a crowd of people milling in the intersection of Fourth and Robert, and asked what was going on.

"There's a bomb scare."

The photographer called his photo desk and omitted the word scare. Then he left his car in the middle of the street and jockeyed for a good shooting position. He conjured an image of the building perfectly captured at the precise moment it collapsed. He saw it in his mind's eye and also on the covers of Time and Newsweek. With equal clarity, he saw his photo credit. Only one thing bothered him. The cruddy overcast day had wet cement for light. He loved to light and pose everything just so. How do you pose a building?

All over downtown, phones and pagers buzzed. Fire trucks rolled. Police barricades went up.

At 11:40 the FBI office at the building formally requested the St. Paul Police Department's bomb squad to investigate a suspicious package. They checked the switchboard and the mail room. There had been no bomb threats. They held back on the order to evacuate.

The city did not have a dedicated bomb unit, but in fifteen minutes, two pickup squad members arrived in the white "ice cream truck" with their bomb disposal wagon in tow. At twelve noon they took control of the site. After confirming that everyone was out of the rear entry area, one cop remotely toggled a wheeled robot down the truck ramp. The other cop Velcroed on ninety pounds of Kevlar navy blue armor, inserted a thick steel chest plate in the suit's breast pocket, pulled on a sloped visored helmet, activated the internal cooling system, struggled into a pair of cumbersome mittens, and clanked through the door.

If this was the big one, the suit would maybe allow the coroner to have an intact corpse to poke. The guy wearing the suit knew this.

He approached the X-ray machine and made a visual inspection. Two shadows on the video screen caught his attention. The detonator cap was inert, missing a portion, and the connecting wires were, in the lingo of his dark trade, "shunted," meaning crossed. Not an open circuit.

In case the bomb squad was having a bad day, the creator of the apparatus had stuck thin lead foil strips on the "explosive" bundle to painstakingly spell out: SMILE IF YOU EAT SHIT.

"Bomb hoax," the bomb tech radioed his partner.

But, following procedure, and just in case, they remotely disrupted the package. The man in the suit used a sixteen-foot pole with a pincer to move it off the X-ray machine and place it on the floor. Then they toggled in the robot and blew the box apart using a twelve-gauge water cannon on the robot's arm.

After the robot's video camera inspected the debris, the man in the suit went in again, made a visual sweep, and issued an official all clear. He paused in the doorway and removed his helmet. A knot of fast-moving men left the police cordon and approached him.

Perusing the stern faces and spit-shined wing tips, the bomb cop queried, "You FBI?" The agents nodded. "Who's Lorn Garrison?" he asked.

"I'm Garrison," said a tall, saturnine senior guy. Maybe fifty-five.

The bomb cop handed Garrison a sopping wet portion of cardboard with the address on it. Expressionless, he said, "You've got mail."

Garrison peered through the door at the scattered box. A white cloud seeped from some of the debris.

Garrison sniffed. "Is that smoke?"

The bomb cop shook his head. "Vapor. It's safe--physically. I don't know about psychologically."

The agents exchanged glances. Going in, Garrison tapped his finger on the typed return address on the crumpled wet cardboard that bore a St. Paul postmark, dated yesterday:

Alex Gorski
3173 Harriet Place
St. Paul


The Big Law. Copyright © by Chuck Logan. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2007

    Another Great Series With a Complex Hero

    I started reading the Phil Broker series in non-sequential order, this being the next to last for me. With each installment the main characters (Broker and Nina) get more complex, interesting and likeable. The books all have plots that you don't solve in the first chapter, in fact, they take some thought to keep up. All in all, the Big Law was an excellent read. I'm getting ready to start the last one (which is really the first one)The Price of Money. I'm looking forward to it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2014

    Backstory Interesting.

    Enjoyed reading the introduction of main characters into the Broker series; they are interesting in subsequent stories. I skipped quite a bit of detail padding the late chapters as I wanted to get to the finale and it also seemed that this e-book version repeated one or two chapters. Broker, his friends, Kit, all fun reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    This author knows how to write. Sylvester Stallone has already written a screenplay based upon a different Logan book, and this Big Law could be a sequal. Keeps moving, thoughtfully written, good characters, unexpected plot twists. Good read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)