Big Moon Tortilla

Big Moon Tortilla

by Joy Cowley, Dyanne Strongbow
     
 

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Marta Enos is having a bad day. It begins when the wind blows her homework out the window and the dogs chew it to pieces. Her grandmother consoles her with a tortilla as "big and pale as a rising full moon," along with ancient words of advice. This charming story, set on a Papago reservation in southern Arizona near the Mexican border, offers Native American wisdom

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Overview

Marta Enos is having a bad day. It begins when the wind blows her homework out the window and the dogs chew it to pieces. Her grandmother consoles her with a tortilla as "big and pale as a rising full moon," along with ancient words of advice. This charming story, set on a Papago reservation in southern Arizona near the Mexican border, offers Native American wisdom that helps children—and adults as well—put their problems in perspective.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
Disaster strikes when Marta Enos and her feet scurry away from homework and toward Grandmother's fresh and fragrant tortillas. But Grandmother consoles Marta, saying, "Hush! Hush! If you cry so much you'll put out the fire." The old lady's metaphors of comfort draw upon the desert and its plants and animals, and pretty soon Marta Enos and her feet begin to dance again. Marta Enos doesn't actually resolve her problem quite on her own, but she's a spirited little protagonist anyway. In Strongbow's watercolors the muted tones of the desert take on the luster of the big moon itself.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
Disaster strikes when Marta's homework papers fly out the window, are chewed up by a dog and then her eyeglasses break. Grandmother soothes Marta with a healing story. "See yourself as a tree, a mountain lion, or an eagle to get a new perspective on your problem." As Marta eats the fresh tortilla, she knows she will be an eagle and laugh at the small problems down below. Good advice for us all. The setting is a contemporary Tohono O'odham (Papago) village in Arizona. Serve this story with warm tortillas and a hint of salsa.
Children's Literature
Marta Enos is distracted by her Grandmother's cooking tortillas when disaster strikes. Her homework takes flight and her glasses are broken during the ensuing recovery attempt. Brokenhearted, Marta is comforted by Grandmother, the words of a wise healing song and a warm tortilla. Joy Cowley's beautifully illustrated story contains a lovely message about viewing and resolving those disasters that blow through everyone's life. 1998, Boyds Mills Press. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Julie Eick Granchelli
School Library Journal
Set on a Papago reservation in Arizona, young Marta's story unfolds across a watercolor desert landscape and in the warm, brown arms of her grandmother. The child's problems seem simple: her homework has blown away and her glasses have broken. Her grandmother teaches her how to face these small disasters with a sense of possibility and choice. (Gr 2-5) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590780374
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
09/02/2004
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
704,703
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
760L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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