The Big Shuffle

( 8 )

Overview

“We’re approaching Cat in the Hat level chaos and no one’s even had breakfast yet.”

When the death of her father leaves her mother bereft and incapacitated, card shark Hallie Palmer returns home from college to raise Hallie’s eight younger siblings. Hallie’s older brother has a scholarship and a sensible major–which translates to free tuition and desperately needed future income for the family. So it’s up to Hallie to deal herself in as head of the chaotic household.

But even ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (29) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $2.74   
  • Used (24) from $1.99   
Big Shuffle

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

“We’re approaching Cat in the Hat level chaos and no one’s even had breakfast yet.”

When the death of her father leaves her mother bereft and incapacitated, card shark Hallie Palmer returns home from college to raise Hallie’s eight younger siblings. Hallie’s older brother has a scholarship and a sensible major–which translates to free tuition and desperately needed future income for the family. So it’s up to Hallie to deal herself in as head of the chaotic household.

But even after the invasion of those well-meaning, casserole-carrying purveyors of comfort the local church ladies, Hallie’s in a downward spiral. Thank goodness for old friends like Bernard and Gil, now proud parents, who keep Hallie afloat with good humor, brilliant organizational skills, and Judy Garland’s most quotable quotes–not that life is entirely peaceful now that Bernard’s wise, willful, and delightfully outrageous mother, Olivia, is back from Europe with a big (and shockingly young) surprise.

Through it all, Hallie discovers that life can indeed turn on a dime, and that every coin has two sides plus an edge. Just because beginner’s luck doesn’t always last forever doesn’t mean you’re out of the game.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Laura Pedersen’s lively imagination has created a cast of zany characters and an unforgettable heroine.”
–Bev Marshall, author of Hot Fudge Sundae Blues, on Heart’s Desire
Library Journal
Hallie Palmer is back, and her world remains as turbulent as ever. This third entry in Pedersen's Palmer series, following Beginner's Luck and Heart's Desire, recaptures the same balance of zaniness and compassion. Called home from college by her father's sudden death, Hallie feels her world continue to spin out of control as her mother's emotional breakdown leaves her in charge of her eight younger siblings. With the steady if sometimes unconventional help of longtime mentor Bernard and his partner, Gil, along with her truly unconventional great-uncle, Lenny, she manages for the most part, at least to hold the family together. A steady onslaught of snow storms, floods, chicken pox, and financial woes keeps life off balance, but humor and hope shine through. The result is an engaging, light read suitable for general fiction collections. The book includes an interview with the author and discussion questions for reading groups. Jan Blodgett, Davidson, NC Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Third installment in the Hallie Palmer series (Heart's Desire, 2005, etc.) offers more somber subject matter: the death of a parent. Nearly 19 and studying graphic design at the Cleveland Art Institute, Hallie is summoned from a fraternity party (in this world, art students apparently hang out with jocks and frat boys) by news that her 39-year-old father has suffered a fatal heart attack and her mother is in shock and sedated. Returning home to her nine siblings, Hallie soon realizes that she'll be bearing the brunt of child-care duties. Older brother Eric must return to college or he'll lose his scholarship, younger sister Louise has run away to live with her boyfriend at M.I.T., and Mom has been moved to a psychiatric hospital. So Hallie drops out of school and begins as best as she can to raise seven kids on the Palmers's scant savings. Old friends lend a hand: Bernard Stockton and his boyfriend Gil offer the occasional gourmet meal and showtune-inspired pep talk; old poker buddies Officer Rich and bookie Cappy keep a watchful eye; and Uncle Lenny, a salty sailor the children adore, puts order and laughter back into the grieving household. Finally, Pastor Costello takes over and gives Hallie a much-needed break to work on her deteriorating love life. The two previous books were set among the Stocktons, rich eccentrics with whom Hallie stayed while sorting out her home life. Relegating this wacky clan to the background while Hallie's large family takes center stage works to this story's disadvantage. The author devotes many pages to describing the utter chaos created by a large family, but fails to provide the amusing details and memorable characters that would keep all thosechores from becoming a chore to read about. Pedersen is not at her best in this dull chronicle of family life.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345479563
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/31/2006
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 793,712
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

Laura Pedersen
Laura Pedersen was the youngest columnist for the The New York Times. Her first novel, Going Away Party, won the Three Oaks Prize for Fiction. Beginner's Luck was selected by Barnes & Noble for "Discover Great New Writers," by Borders for "Original Voices," and by the Literary Guild as an alternate selection. Additional titles include Last Call, Heart's Desire, The Big Shuffle, and The Sweetest Hours. Laura has appeared on "Oprah," "Good Morning America," "Primetime Live," "The Today Show," and David Letterman. She's performed stand-up comedy at "The Improv" and writes material for several well-known comedians. LauraPedersenBooks.com.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

ONE

It’s a cold and windless January night following a two-day winter storm. All across the campus of the Cleveland Art Institute a blanket of snow sparkles as if encrusted with tiny diamonds. Thick clouds blot out the moonlight and for a moment it feels that all of nature is hushed.

Suzy, Robin, and I walk the half mile to the Theta Chi frat house, a box-shaped building with dark brown vinyl siding that looks like it could be the back part of a church where the priests reside, were it not for the large wooden Greek letters hanging between the second and third floors. Theta Chi is hosting a Welcome Back keg party and all comers are indeed welcome, so long as they can produce an ID, real or otherwise, along with twenty bucks to be paid in cash at the door.

I have to go because my roommate Suzy has a huge crush on the president, and she convinces Robin and me to be her accomplices in the manhunt. But being that it’s a new semester, and a brand-new year, I’m certainly open for adventure. When you’re eighteen, the possibilities seem endless. At the same time, I’m feeling a bit lonely, since Craig, the guy I really like, attends college in Minnesota. We’re eleven hundred miles apart, and he and I both agreed that it’s best not to be exclusive with each other, at least for now.

Once inside the front door we pay our cover charge and a guy wearing a multicolored felt jester hat uses a stamp to emblazon the backs of our hands with big purple beavers. In the strobe-lit entrance hall Billy Joel blares from speakers that seem to be everywhere. The jacked-up bass causes the wooden floorboards to thump so it feels as if there’s a heartbeat in each foot. The couches are pushed back against the walls and from the ceiling of the large living room hang dozens of strings of chili pepper lights that cast a crazy quilt of patterns onto the guests. Young people stand around holding big red plastic cups, occasionally leaning in close to yell something at one other. They nod or laugh and over near the fireplace a few dance.

A guy wearing a T-shirt that says, freshmen girls—get ’em while they’re skinny, rolls a fresh keg past us and catches my eye. He’s heading toward a place underneath a mangy bison head where participants in a Chug for Charity contest appear to be making excellent progress.

Oh my gosh—it’s Josh! He’s a junior in the art department whom I had a crush on the entire first semester of my freshman year, while he didn’t even know I was alive.

After dropping off the keg he comes over and hands me a beer. “Do I know you?”

“Hallie Palmer,” I reply, trying not to feel devastated that he doesn’t remember my name.

We begin a shouted exchange and I remind him of the shared computer graphics class.

“Oh yeah,” he says and nods.

Though whether he means that he remembers the class or me is impossible to tell. Our talk segues to general stuff like movies and families. Only the problem is that now, after so much fantasizing about our nonexistent relationship, and several beers, I’m experiencing difficulty separating the real conversation from all the imaginary ones I had with him last fall. For instance, Josh looks surprised when I talk about having nine brothers and sisters, whereas I’m thinking we covered that months ago.

I act interested in everything that Josh says about where he’s from and what he’s studying even though I already know all of this from looking up his campus profile on the Internet. I may be majoring in graphic arts, but like most college women, I minor in stalking.

Just when I fear we’ve run out of conversation, he says, “Hey, wanna dance?”

We put down our plastic cups and move to the area in front of the fireplace where throngs of intoxicated students dance to Jason Mraz’s “I’ll Do Anything.” I’m probably reading too much into the situation, as usual, but it’s as if every line of the song has a double, or even triple meaning.

When the next song begins Josh appears to be finished with the dancing part of the evening. He stands still while everyone begins jumping around to “Heat Wave.” Meantime, Suzy pushes her way toward us through the closely packed gyrating crowd, carefully ducking and maneuvering so as not to disturb any of the headgear with beer cans attached to the top and plastic tubes running into the mouths of thirsty revelers. Her cheeks are flushed. “I found Ross! He’s upstairs!”

“This is Josh,” I lean in close and say to Suzy.

“Hey Josh,” she shouts, barely glancing over at him. “Hallie, they’re playing strip poker upstairs and you have to come because I don’t know how to play and—” Suzy stops midstream and looks back at Josh. “Is that Josh?” she asks me. The emphasis is code for: the guy you were so obsessed with that I thought a counselor was going to have to be brought in for an assist?

“Yes,” I bob my head up and down to indicate it’s that Josh.

Suzy smiles. This translates to: He’s really cute and you’re going to get lucky tonight!

“You said that you found Ross,” I remind her.

Suzy grabs both our hands. “Come teach me how to play strip poker.”

“Actually I’m not much of a poker player,” says Josh, holding his ground.

“Me neither,” I lie. I’ve been playing poker since I was seven, but why appear anxious when Suzy is going to close this deal for me?

“Please, you guys.” She pulls us in the direction of the wide staircase that empties into the back of the living room. What might soon qualify as a three-alarm blaze is now roaring in the fireplace. The room was already hot and redolent of spilled beer, and now it’s becoming filled with thick gray smoke.

Suzy is giddy with excitement, turning back and smiling every few seconds as she directs us to the second floor, and then up a narrow staircase that leads to a refinished attic. Eight kids are lounging around on oversized pillows in a dimly lit room with a lava lamp in the corner and music wailing from a CD player on the floor. Everyone is still fully dressed, and if the loud laughing and joking is anything to go by, no longer fully sober. A guy wearing khaki shorts, a frat house T-shirt, and a cowboy hat shuffles a deck of cards. There’s the faint but distinctive aroma of marijuana, though given that the one hexagonal window in the room doesn’t open, it’s impossible to tell whether the scent is from tonight’s group or previous parties.

“Are you outlaws here to play poker or are you delivering the pizza?” says the guy nearest the boom box, whom I recognize as Ross, Suzy’s big crush.

Everyone laughs uproariously at this stupid joke. Suzy releases our hands and I come out from behind her. A girl named Jennifer and a guy named Kevin, both of whom I recognize from my freshman dorm, say, “I didn’t know I was going to play against Hallie Palmer,” and “Now things are really getting exciting.”

It’s not unknown for me to sit in on a dorm game and clean up a pot or two. Most of the kids aren’t exactly strong opponents to begin with; however, they usually drink while playing, giving me an even greater advantage. People who booze while they bet tend not to fold nearly as early or often as they should.

The cowboy-hat guy calls for a game of five-card draw with deuces wild. Ross announces that we all have to start with our shoes and socks either on or off.

Jennifer holds up her hand and says, “We didn’t decide about underwear.”

The four guys yell “no” to underwear while the five women shout “yes.” “I’ll do odds or evens with one of the girls,” states Ross. The girls could argue this but they don’t because some secretly want to play down to the nude. Let’s face it, a girl doesn’t join a game of strip poker unless she likes one of the guy players or she’s incredibly drunk.

Suzy volunteers to throw out fingers against Ross, promptly loses the underwear option, and then conveniently remains sitting next to him.

Picking up my cards I find a pair of sixes and a wild two. With the chance to replace two cards, this means the prospect of four sixes! Though I don’t receive another six or wild card, an ace comes my way. Kevin’s three sixes made with a wild two have only a queen high and so I’m the winner. The others good-naturedly remove an article of clothing and throw it into the center of the circle. After four more rounds I’ve lost only my pants, while almost everyone else is down to their underwear, and Jennifer has also lost her bra. The girls nervously alternate puffs on cigarettes with long sips of beer. Between the cloud formed by their cigarettes and the stream of smoke rising from downstairs, the room is becoming more than hazy, and so I don’t know how much we’ll actually be able to see when people are fully naked.

Mr. Cowboy Hat, whom I’ve since found out is named Justin, is the first one required to throw in his underwear, but removes his Stetson instead. The girls cry foul.

“You’d better show us more than your side part!” exclaims Christine.

“There’s no rule against hats,” insists Justin. “You could have worn one.”

“If that’s the case then my ring and necklace count as articles of clothing,” argues a braless Jennifer.

The more those two bicker the more everyone else roars with laughter. Between Josh placing his hand on my knee every few minutes and the good cards that keep coming my way, I decide that this must indeed be my lucky night.

“Hall-ie . . .” I hear my name echoing somewhere within the swirl of music, shouts of laughter, and a gauzy but pleasant alcoholic haze.

It can’t be. It cannot be the voice that boomerangs through the garden at the Stocktons’ and calls me in for dinner at the end of the day.

TWO

Sure enough, Bernard Stockton, my longtime mentor and summer employer, crawls toward the circle on his hands and knees, panting with exhaustion. Oh no—could there have been another breakup with Gil? They’ve seemed so happy since getting back together and adopting the two little Chinese girls. Or worse, maybe something terrible has happened to Olivia and Ottavio on their trip to Italy. A plane crash?

Bernard drops to the floor as if he’s been crawling through the desert and finally reached an oasis. Covered in a heavy down parka with a scarf wrapped around his neck and carrying a fleece hat in hand, sweat pours off Bernard’s face, his eyes are rimmed with red, and he’s gasping for air. But something else is odd. Those aren’t his usual gabardine wool winter slacks. They’re navy blue silk pajama bottoms! Bernard never goes out of the house unless he’s immaculately dressed and every salt and pepper hair is in place.

“Hallie!”

“Bernard!” Whatever is he doing here, right now?

“Heavens to Betsy Bloomingdale.” Bernard begins coughing uncontrollably and pounds his hand on the floor while catching his breath. “I’m tipsy and tripping and dying of asphyxiation without having imbibed nor inhaled.” Bernard raises his head an inch. “And possibly betrothed—some woman thinks I’m George Clooney and kissed me solidly on the mouth. She has eyes like cherry strudel and appears to be riding high on everything but skates.”

“Kimberly,” everyone says in unison.

Jennifer grabs a T-shirt off the mound of clothes in the center of the circle and covers her bare chest. Otherwise the group doesn’t appear bothered by the adult intrusion, at least after making certain it’s no one from the dean’s office or else the campus police on the prowl for underage drinkers.

“Hallie, I’ve been searching absolutely everywhere for you. Come on—we have to go!” Bernard doesn’t so much as say hello to the rest of the kids, which is totally unlike him. “I don’t want you to be alarmed,” he says in a voice that suggests I should be very alarmed indeed, “but your father had a heart attack.”

Huh? My dad—a heart attack—impossible! He’s young and strong and not even forty! I sit there stunned.

With a certain amount of dramatic huffing and puffing Bernard rises to his feet. “We must go to the hospital now!” He enunciates the words as if talking to someone who can only lip read.

Not knowing what to say I stand up and walk toward him like an automaton. It’s only when I reach the door that Bernard says, “It’s rather chilly outside, you might want to consider pants.”

Josh has anticipated this and dug my jeans from out of the clothing pile. After handing them to me he retrieves my socks and shoes from the corner of the room.

I quickly dress and we head toward the main floor. The entire house is now chock-full of people partying, swaying to music, and propped up against walls, their outstretched legs blocking the hallways and stairwells. Bernard is pardonnez- moi-ing every step of the way through this obstacle course while towing me along behind him. We finally reach the front door, but it takes another moment to push through a crowd of rowdy women who claim to have paid earlier. The heavyset doorman is effectively blocking their entrance and shouting, “Show me your beavers!”

Bernard looks questioningly at me. “Hand stamp,” I explain. But it’s too loud to hear anything, and so I hold mine up to Bernard’s face and he nods in understanding.

Once we’re outside Bernard continues to yell as if he’s still competing with the music. “Gil is waiting in the car with the girls. I’ve been to so many different parties I don’t even know where I am anymore.”

“What did you park in front of?” I holler back, though it’s quiet now but for a few shouts coming from a late-night snowball fight across the quad.

“There was a sculpture out front—like a giant toadstool.”

“That’s the science building,” I say. “It’s supposed to be a molecule or something.”

I hurry Bernard in the correct direction and the fresh air clears my head slightly. “Is it serious?” I ask.

“I’m not sure. Your sister Louise phoned.” We’ve been jogging for a few minutes, and it’s not so easy to catch our breath. “You . . . can . . . call her . . . from . . . the car.”

I locate the maroon Volvo that Bernard recently traded for his vintage silver Alfa Romeo parked across from the science building with its engine running, the exhaust puffing a cloud of gray smoke into the cold winter air.

The girls are asleep in their car seats in the back and I climb between them while Bernard dives into the passenger side. The moment I pull the door closed Gil shoves a cell phone in my ear and puts the car into gear so that we jump away from the curb.

My sister Louise is frantic on the other end of the line. “Hallie? Is that you?”

“Yeah,” I exhale heavily.

“Thank God they found you! Please go to the hospital right away and find out what’s going on. I’m stuck here with the kids. Every time the phone rings I practically faint.” Louise sounds as if she’s starting to cry, and that it’s not for the first time over the past few hours. “I woke up and the paramedics were flying down the stairs with Dad on a stretcher and Mom threw a coat over her nightgown and yelled for me to watch the kids. Reggie’s been screaming bloody murder. I finally gave him a bottle of regular milk. It’ll probably kill him. Tell Bernard and Gil that I’m sorry to have woken them up, but I didn’t know what else to do.”

“No, it’s fine.” I’m suddenly feeling incredibly sober.

“I got hold of Eric about an hour ago,” reports Louise. “He’s taking a bus from Indiana.”

“I’ll go to the hospital, find out what’s happening, and then call you right back.” I click off the phone and let my head tip over backward.

“Don’t worry,” says Gil. “The new hospital has a terrific cardiac unit—state of the art.”

“How old is your dad?” asks Bernard.

“Both my parents are thirty-nine.” It’s easy to remember because I just have to add nineteen to Eric’s age.

“Oh, that’s young,” says Bernard. “He’ll be fine. They can do quadruple bypasses and even replace valves with animal parts. We eat too much ham and bacon and then the surgeons give us pig aortas. It’s one giant recycling system. If your heart can’t be salvaged, then they just throw it away and stitch in a whole new one.”

I certainly hope Bernard is right, but I fear that he’s just trying to make me feel better.

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. When the Palmer family is in crisis, it’s decided that Hallie will leave school to take over and not her brother Eric, who is a year older. Was this the right decision? In your family, are tasks typically divided into what is considered “men’s work” and “women’s work”?

2. The neighbor lady, Mrs. Muldoon, has a daughter in Arizona who wants her mother to come and live out there. Only Mrs. Muldoon has spent her entire life in town and doesn’t want to leave. What are some of the pros and cons of having family members living nearby?

3. Do you belong to a community, organization, or close circle of friends who can rely upon each other when in need?

4. What do you think is the worst possible age to lose a parent?

5. In the Palmer family the girls tend to have major difficulties during their teenage years while the boys stay the course. In your experience, is it more common for boys or girls to have a rough patch as teenagers, or the same for both?

6. Do you think it’s possible to forecast how your friends or family members would react to a family crisis like the one Hal-lie experiences, or is it impossible to tell with people until they’re actually in such a situation?

7. Louise leaves home shortly after her father dies. Have you ever had a relationship or a bad experience in a particular place and felt that the only solution was to leave?

8. At a certain point Hallie wonders if something she may have done has caused tragedy to strike. Do you believe that good and bad things happen in life based on our behavior?

9. When Craig drops out of college, Hallie worries that he’s jeopardizing his future. What would you advise Craig to do? How important is a college education today?

10. Olivia’s boyfriend Ottavio turns out to be the jealous type and flies into a rage when she strikes up a friendship with a man. Did you feel Ottavio acted appropriately, or was his reaction out of proportion with the situation?

11. When Olivia takes up with a younger man, her son views this as being scandalous. Is there a double standard in society that allows for men to date younger women but not vice versa?

12. Going out with Auggie seems to help Hallie realize what she really wants in a boyfriend. Do you believe in love at first sight? Do you think that your first love is your only true love? Are you rational about the qualities you look for in a partner or do you base decisions purely on attraction and emotion?

13. Hallie and Craig finally decide to have a serious one-on-one relationship. How old must a person be to recognize true love and function in a mature relationship?

14. Hallie holds much of her grief inside because she’s trying not to upset her younger siblings. Are there times when it’s best to try to conceal your emotions, or is this almost always unhealthy?

15. While going through some papers Hallie discovers that her mother married and gave birth to her older brother earlier than she’d led the family to believe, largely because she regretted having dropped out of school. Is it okay for parents to keep some secrets, or is honesty always the best policy?

16. Even though Hallie cares very much for Pastor Costello, she’s extremely angry when she discovers that he has feelings for her mother. In your experience, do most children react negatively to the prospect of a parent striking up a new relationship after a death or divorce?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 11, 2011

    Enjoyed this as much as her last novel

    Having read Hearts Desire last month I was hoping this would follow in the same well-written and interesting tale. It did not fail to disappoint. A maudlin tale is made to feel somewhat light-hearted and even humorous. Not always an easy feat for any author but Pedersen manages it with style and sagacity.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Really good book!!!!!!

    The Big Shuffle was recommended to me by a friend and I haven't read Hallie's other adventures...but now I'm totally excited to!!!! I loved it!

    A tragedy rocks Hallie's world in the first couple of chapters and totally changes her life from carefree college student to responsible adult. It's a huge life change, but Laura Pedersen does a great job of mixing tragedy with humor and warmth and I was completely hooked on Hallie's journey. Her narration made me laugh and yet, she also really touches your heart. Great character and a wonderful book!

    I have to read the other books now and see how it all began. That being said, you can definitely read this book first. It's great all by itself!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Carrie Spellman for TeensReadToo.com

    Hallie Palmer just wants to be a normal college student. But that idea has just flown out the window of the frat party she got pulled away from. Her dad just passed away, which caused her mom to have a nervous breakdown. The doctor's send her mom to Dalewood, the local mental institution, for rest and recovery. <BR/><BR/>With Dad gone, and Mom in the "nuthouse", Hallie is back in the place she worked so hard to escape, home. Now she has to arrange a funeral, take care of her eight younger brothers and sisters, sort through insurance information, conquer the growing stack of bills, and figure out which twin brother is which. (If only the ribbon had stayed in place!) Not to mention the runaway sister, the burst pipes in the basement, an on-again off-again boyfriend, and meetings with the school principal who still doesn't like her. Hallie's got her work cut out for her, and she's pretty sure she's done for. <BR/><BR/>Help, and sometimes entertainment, come in strange forms, and Hallie learns that beggars can't be choosers. From the churchwomen brigade who feed them, to crazy Uncle Lenny, who has some questionable ideas about bedtime stories (among other things), to a babysitting chimp, to even crazier Aunt Lala who's more than a little absentminded... It may not be much of a life, but it certainly isn't boring! <BR/><BR/>This is not the first book about Hallie Palmer, but I can say from experience that it stands alone. (Having not read any of the others at this point, though I think I may have to do that now.) I do rather feel like I might have had more connection to the secondary characters if I had read the other books. (It took me awhile to figure out that Gil and Bernard were both men.) Nonetheless, I still found them lovable and entertaining. While I found Hallie a little frustrating at times, it helped to realize that I would be more than lost in that situation. There is a lot going on in this book, but it never felt jumbled or lost. I don't know if Hallie and I would be friends, but I certainly like the people she hangs around with!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2007

    a reviewer

    Hallie Palmer just wants to be a normal college student. But that idea has just flown out the window of the frat party she got pulled away from. Her dad just passed away, which caused her mom to have a nervous breakdown. The doctor¿s send her mom to Dalewood, the local mental institution, for rest and recovery. With Dad gone, and Mom in the ¿nuthouse¿, Hallie is back in the place she worked so hard to escape, home. Now she has to arrange a funeral, take care of her eight younger brothers and sisters, sort through insurance information, conquer the growing stack of bills, and figure out which twin brother is which. (If only the ribbon had stayed in place!) Not to mention the runaway sister, the burst pipes in the basement, an on-again off-again boyfriend, and meetings with the school principal who still doesn¿t like her. Hallie¿s got her work cut out for her, and she¿s pretty sure she¿s done for. Help, and sometimes entertainment, come in strange forms, and Hallie learns that beggars can¿t be choosers. From the churchwomen brigade who feed them, to crazy Uncle Lenny, who has some questionable ideas about bedtime stories (among other things), to a babysitting chimp, to even crazier Aunt Lala who¿s more than a little absentminded¿ It may not be much of a life, but it certainly isn¿t boring! This is not the first book about Hallie Palmer, but I can say from experience that it stands alone. (Having not read any of the others at this point, though I think I may have to do that now.) I do rather feel like I might have had more connection to the secondary characters if I had read the other books. (It took me awhile to figure out that Gil and Bernard were both men.) Nonetheless, I still found them lovable and entertaining. While I found Hallie a little frustrating at times, it helped to realize that I would be more than lost in that situation. There is a lot going on in this book, but it never felt jumbled or lost. I don¿t know if Hallie and I would be friends, but I certainly like the people she hangs around with! **Reviewed by: Carrie Spellman

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    a reviewer

    Eighteen years old card shark and graphic design student Hallie Palmer is enjoying life at the Cleveland Art Institute especially the partying when her summer boss Bernard Stockton arrives to tell her that her father is in the hospital having suffered a heart attack. Bernard and his lover Gil along with their adopted child take Hallie first to the hospital where she learns her mom is sedated having fallen into shock and soon after that her not quite forty dad died. Hallie takes charge of her eight younger siblings while the oldest Eric comes home from attending college in New York to help. --- After talking with Eric, Hallie realizes she must parent her brothers and sisters as Eric is on scholarship. She expects the next in line Louise to help, but she decamps to Massachusetts to live with her boyfriend. Hallie leaves school to raise the seven other Palmer kids with help from her friends Bernard, Gil Police Officer Rich and bookie Cappy. However the best help comes from former sailor Uncle Lenny, who brings discipline, order and humor into a shattered house. --- Switching from the middle class teen¿s amusing poker life amidst the wealthy (see BEGINNER'S LUCK and HEARTS DESIRE) to mothering a family in chaos loses some of the humorous sting that the first two tales contained. The much more serious tome of the story line focuses on the fiasco of a teen with help trying to bring order to her seven little Foys (make that Palmers). Hallie loses some of her spunk (who wouldn¿t) as she draws a losing hand that she has no choice but to play. Fans of the series will appreciate her efforts to run a full house instead of playing a full house. --- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2006

    Pedersen Has A Winner

    Hallie Palmer is a gambler. But when her father dies suddenly and her mother's grief lands her in Dalewood (where the crazy people are sent), she learns that there's more to life than skill and luck. Sometimes it's the people that surround you that keep a person in the game of life. Hallie's older brother Eric has a college scholarship (free tuition), so the care of the eight younger siblings falls on Hallie. The cast of characters who enter the Palmer household to provide help and support include casserole-carrying church ladies, an aunt who is more trouble than help, an eccentric great uncle, the local pastor, and Bernard and Gil who have recently adopted two little girls from China. It's Bernard who keeps Hallie grounded with his generosity, humor and organizational skills. The Big Shuffle is an engaging story with zany characters, humor galore and a life lesson that smacks of real life. Pedersen has a winner. The Big Shuffle is a stand-alone book, but we recommend her Hallie Palmer novels, Beginners Luck and Heart's Desire. Armchair Interviews says: Pedersen's books will make you laugh and cry, and you'll love them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)