Bigger Than Daddy

Bigger Than Daddy

by Harriet Ziefert, Elliot Kreloff
     
 

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In this story about the relationship between a boy and his father, Edward yearns to be big like his dad and fast like a fire truck. He and his dad go to the park, then walk home, play, and have dinner before Edward has a bath and is tucked into bed. Along the way, the boy demands the chance to engage in grown-up activities, ranging from the doable (pressing the

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Overview

In this story about the relationship between a boy and his father, Edward yearns to be big like his dad and fast like a fire truck. He and his dad go to the park, then walk home, play, and have dinner before Edward has a bath and is tucked into bed. Along the way, the boy demands the chance to engage in grown-up activities, ranging from the doable (pressing the elevator button) to the less doable (outrunning a big red fire truck). Capturing the teasing affection between a young preschool boy and his dad, the simple language shows the humor, energy, and bossiness of the young child, and the father's love for his son shining through. Parents will recognize Edward's many familiar pleas, while kids will appreciate his frustrations and the spirited way that he deals with them.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This father-son book is part Runaway Bunny, part Mama, Do You Love Me, part Guess How Much I Love You, and part Freaky Friday. It explores a day at the park, the return home, and a game in which they exchange roles, thus convincing Edward, the father, that sometimes children long to be big and sometimes they want to be just the size they are. Set in an urban locale, the story shows the pair riding up on an elevator to their apartment. Edward gets to play a game (the game of you be me and I'll be you) "before dinner." He is very relieved when Daddy is "big and tall" and able to make dinner. In the bath, Edward teases Daddy, "What if I were a big, huge whale and swam across the ocean?" Daddy answers, "then how could I dry you off . . . comb your hair . . . tuck you in and kiss you good night." Daddy sets the boundaries that Edward needs to learn in life; for example, when Edward pretends to be an airplane, Daddy says, "Time for you to fly this way . . . We need to go home for dinner." Edward plays willingly, yet knows when the game should end and dinner begin. The author explores a number of parent/child interactions all in one book: admonitions to be careful at the park, time constraints, expectations of each person, and duties found in most households. This book depicts a loving bond between father and son portrayed with child-like, stylized drawings for the pleasure of bedtime reading. 2006, Blue Apple Books/Handprint Books, Ages 4 to 6.
—Sheilah Egan
School Library Journal
PreS-A slight story about the relationship between a boy and his father. Edward yearns to be big like his dad and fast like a fire truck. He wants to be all grown up-until his legs get tired and he wants to be carried home. Before dinner they play a game in which Edward and his dad switch roles for a little while, with Edward scolding the man for not drinking his juice. Then Edward wants a drink and the role switching ends. Kreloff's naive pastel-and-collage illustrations use simple lines and strong colors to enhance the youngster's perspective. Children will enjoy the sweet story and will take comfort in the common scenarios.-Mary Hazelton, Elementary Schools in Warren & Waldoboro, ME Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Ziefert enters Charlotte Zolotow territory with an intimate bit of give-and-take between little Edward, who wishes he were bigger, and his father as they walk home from the playground, engage in a bit of playful role reversal (" 'You've been a bad boy,' said Edward. 'And you haven't finished your juice.' ") and then get ready for bed. In distinctly childlike crayon-and-cut-paper pictures, Kreloff depicts the pair with light brown skin, frizzy hair and smiles. Young readers and listeners, whether from single-parent households like this or otherwise, will smile too. (Picture book. 4-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781609051358
Publisher:
Blue Apple Books
Publication date:
07/01/2011
Pages:
36
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Harriet Ziefert has always wanted to explore a young child's wish to be "big" in a picture book format.

Elliot Kreloff is an illustrator, graphic designer, and a dad. He lives in Harlem, New York, with his partner, Stephen Morris, his daughter, Samantha, and his two dogs, Rainbow and TicTac. —This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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