Bill Frisell with Dave Holland and Elvin Jones

Bill Frisell with Dave Holland and Elvin Jones

4.0 1
by Bill Frisell
     
 
Though the title of this album by avant-jazz guitarist Bill Frisell is clunky, the music within moves with the assuredness and high internal drama of a Clint Eastwood cowboy film. Frisell�s cinematic songwriting often recalls this image, but the leanness of a trio makes the pictures even more vivid. And what a trio: The illustrious and powerful drummer Elvin Jones

Overview

Though the title of this album by avant-jazz guitarist Bill Frisell is clunky, the music within moves with the assuredness and high internal drama of a Clint Eastwood cowboy film. Frisell�s cinematic songwriting often recalls this image, but the leanness of a trio makes the pictures even more vivid. And what a trio: The illustrious and powerful drummer Elvin Jones plays as smoothly as the gait of a fine Arabian mare, tempering his drums to fit Frisell�s moods. On the cover of Henry Mancini�s �Moon River,� Jones�s simple brushes illustrate the song�s romantic innocence. He uses them again to sweeten the mournful �Again,� but only after setting the mood with an opening power play. Bassist Dave Holland, no slouch himself in the annals of jazz, converses with the guitarist as if they were long-lost brothers, often playful and usually supportive. Their two instruments even get into a bit of an argument on �Tell Your Ma, Tell Your Pa� before sliding into sync. On �Convict 13� Holland plays as simply as a blues-band bassist. Much of the project has this loose, unrehearsed feel. These players have never worked as a trio before, and it is their striving for common ground that gives the CD its excitement and beauty.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - John Duffy
What can you expect but good things from a date featuring three players of such high pedigree. With Dave Holland and Elvin Jones representing the steadfast rhythm sections of old, and with Frisell's post-modern tones being among the finest voices moving jazz forward, a date like this should easily yield some classic moments. But Frisell comes up with only partial melodies and bare bones sketches for the band to play. Jones sounds at times utterly bored with his rhythm duties, desperate for a chance to stretch out. Frisell himself is often hesitant. Henry Mancini's "Moon River" and Stephen Foster's century-and-a-half old "Hard Times" together offer brief glimpses of levity, but cannot save the set entirely.
Billboard
Holland and Jones warm well to the folk-inflected material, complimenting the guitarist's offbeat charm and unerring taste with their muscular authority.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/02/2001
Label:
Nonesuch
UPC:
0075597962420
catalogNumber:
79624
Rank:
69640

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Bill Frisell with Dave Holland and Elvin Jones 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This recording does not burn. It is laid back and awesome. If you are reading this, then you know the 3 artists here need nothing said about them. I listen to this instrumental cd at night, while cooking, reading. It drones along and is beautiful.