Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk

( 74 )

Overview

A finalist for the National Book Award!

Three minutes and forty-three seconds of intense warfare with Iraqi insurgents has transformed the eight surviving men of Bravo Squad into America's most sought-after heroes. Now they're on a media-intensive nationwide tour to reinvigorate support for the war. On this rainy Thanksgiving, the Bravos are guests of the Dallas Cowboys, slated to be part of the halftime show alongside Destiny's Child.

Among ...

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Overview

A finalist for the National Book Award!

Three minutes and forty-three seconds of intense warfare with Iraqi insurgents has transformed the eight surviving men of Bravo Squad into America's most sought-after heroes. Now they're on a media-intensive nationwide tour to reinvigorate support for the war. On this rainy Thanksgiving, the Bravos are guests of the Dallas Cowboys, slated to be part of the halftime show alongside Destiny's Child.

Among the Bravos is Specialist Billy Lynn. Surrounded by patriots sporting flag pins on their lapels and Support Our Troops bumper stickers, he is thrust into the company of the Cowboys' owner and his coterie of wealthy colleagues; a born-again Cowboys cheerleader; a veteran Hollywood producer; and supersized players eager for a vicarious taste of war. Over the course of this day, Billy will drink and brawl, yearn for home and mourn those missing, face a heart-wrenching decision, and discover pure love and a bitter wisdom far beyond his years.

Winner of the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction
2012 National Book Award Finalist for Fiction
Winner of the 2012 L.A. Times Book Prize for Fiction
Winner of the 2012 Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Unfolding over the course of one Thanksgiving Day, Fountain’s (Brief Encounters with Che Guevara) second novel follows Bravo Company, the eight survivors of a savage clash with Iraqi insurgents, on the last leg of their government-sponsored “Victory Tour” in this witty and ironic sendup of middle America, Fox News politics, and, of all things, football. One minute, the soldiers are drinking Jack and Cokes, mobbed by hordes of well-wishers demanding autographs and seeking “the truth” about what’s “really going on” over there; the next, they’re in the bowels of Texas Stadium, reluctantly hobnobbing with the Dallas Cowboys and their cheerleaders, brokering a movie deal with a smarmy Hollywood producer, and getting into a drunken scuffle with the stadium’s disgruntled road crew, all in a series of uncomfortable scenes that border on the farcical. Texan Billy Lynn is the 19-year-old hero who learns about life and himself on his visit home to his family, and the palpable camaraderie between soldiers ground the book. But despite much valid pontificating on what it means to be a soldier and the chasm that exists between the American public’s perception of the war and the blunt reality of it, the often campy writing style and canned dialogue (“We, like, we wanna do somethin’ like you. Extreme, you know, cap some Muslim freaks...”) prevents the message from being delivered effectively. Agent: Heather Schroder, ICM. (May)
Esquire
“It’s a darkly humorous satire about the war at home, absurd and believable at the same time.”
Library Journal
Billy Lynn is a member of Bravo Company, which acquitted itself heroically in a deadly confrontation early in the Iraq War. An embedded reporter captured the battle on widely broadcast video. Now, on the last day of a victory tour, an insane PR event put on by the army, the company is at a Dallas Cowboys Thanksgiving football game. Native Texan Billy has been deeply affected by the death of squad leader Shroom, who gave him books to read and challenged him to think about what he was doing with his life. During a brief stop at home, Billy's sister urges him to refuse to return to Iraq. Billy also meets one of the fabled Cowboys cheerleaders, with whom he improbably forms an immediate and passionate connection, something that has opened a door to the possibility of a new, more hopeful life. But though Billy has had his eyes opened, in many ways he and his company are happier and feel more purposive as soldiers. VERDICT Employing intricate detail and feverish cinematography, Fountain's (Brief Encounters with Che Guevara: Stories) vividly written novel is an allegorical hero's journey, a descent into madness, and a mirror held up to this society's high-definition TV reality. Tragically unhinged, it also rings completely, hilariously true. [See Prepub Alert, 11/21/11.]—Jim Coan, SUNY at Oneonta
Library Journal
A member of Bravo Squad, whose fiercely fought battle in Iraq was caught on tape by an embedded Fox News crew, Billy Lynn is on a victory tour of sorts with the survivors. In a compacted but unrushed time frame, Fountain effectively captures both the transformative experiences of one young man and the horrific impact of war. As he ponders life choices, Billy makes a surprising decision, bringing to a conclusion a perfect read. (LJ 5/15/12)—Barbara Hoffert

(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Reviews
Hailed as heroes on a stateside tour before returning to Iraq, Bravo Squad discovers just what it has been fighting for. Though the shell-shocked humor will likely conjure comparisons with Catch-22 and Slaughterhouse Five, the debut novel by Fountain (following his story collection, Brief Encounters with Che Guevara, 2006) focuses even more on the cross-promotional media monster that America has become than it does on the absurdities of war. The entire novel takes place over a single Thanksgiving Day, when the eight soldiers (with their memories of the two who didn't make it) find themselves at the promotional center of an all-American extravaganza, a nationally televised Dallas Cowboys football game. Providing the novel with its moral compass is protagonist Billy Lynn, a 19-year-old virgin from small-town Texas who has been inflated into some kind of cross between John Wayne and Audie Murphy for his role in a rescue mission documented by an embedded Fox News camera. In two days, the Pentagon-sponsored "Victory Tour" will end and Bravo will return to the business as usual of war. In the meantime, they are dealing with a producer trying to negotiate a film deal ("Think Rocky meets Platoon," though Hilary Swank is rumored to be attached), glad-handing with the corporate elite of Cowboy fandom (and ownership) and suffering collateral damage during a halftime spectacle with Beyoncé. Over the course of this long, alcohol-fueled day, Billy finds himself torn, as he falls in love (and lust) with a devout Christian cheerleader and listens to his sister try to persuade him that he has done his duty and should refuse to go back. As "Americans fight the war daily in their strenuous inner lives," Billy and his foxhole brethren discover treachery and betrayal beyond anything they've experienced on the battlefield. War is hell in this novel of inspired absurdity.
Jeff Turrentine
…a masterful gut-punch of a debut novel…Catch-22 is about to be updated for a new era. In his immortal classic, Heller was lampooning the military's attempt to bureaucratize the horror of World War II. In Fountain's razor-sharp, darkly comic novel—a worthy neighbor to Catch-22 on the bookshelf of war fiction—the focus has shifted from bureaucracy to publicity, reflecting corresponding shifts in our culture…There's hardly a false note, or even a slightly off-pitch one, in Fountain's sympathetic, damning and structurally ambitious novel.
—The Washington Post
Janet Maslin
…[an] inspired, blistering war novel…Mr. Fountain…sets up this Thanksgiving game as an artfully detailed microcosm of America in general, and George W. Bush's Texas in particular, during the Iraq war. Though it covers only a few hours, the book is a gripping, eloquent provocation. Class, privilege, power, politics, sex, commerce and the life-or-death dynamics of battle all figure in Billy Lynn's surreal game day experience.
—The New York Times
Esquire
“It’s a darkly humorous satire about the war at home, absurd and believable at the same time.”
Madison Smartt Bell
“Ben Fountain’s Halftime is as close to the Great American Novel as anyone is likely to come these days—an extraordinary work that captures and releases the unquiet spirit of our age, and will probably be remembered as one of the important books of this decade.”
Texas Books in Review
“To call Fountain’s work enjoyable would be an understatement because it quite simply is one of the best novels written in the past five years.”
Entertainment Weekly
“The best book about the Iraq War and Destiny’s Child that you’ll ever read.”
Nancy Pearl
“A brilliantly conceived first novel . . . The irony, sorrow, anger and examples of cognitive dissonance that suffuse this novel make it one of the most moving and remarkable novels I’ve ever read.”
Margot Livesey
“Passionate, irreverent, utterly relevant Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk offers an unforgettable portrait of a reluctant hero. Ben Fountain writes like a man inspired and his razor sharp exploration of our contemporary ironies will break your heart.”
Karl Marlantes
“[T]he Catch-22 of the Iraq War....Fountain applies the heat of his wicked sense of humor while you face the truth of who we have become. Live one day inside Billy Lynn’s head and you’ll never again see our soldiers or America in the same way.”
Pat Conroy
“Ben Fountain stormed to the front lines of American fiction when he published his astonishing...Brief Encounters with Che Guevara. His first novel will raise his stature and add to his splendid reputation. Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is both hilarious and heartbreaking.”
Barbara's Picks
“Fountain is the Pen/Hemingway Award winner of the bristly and satisfying Brief Encounters with Che Guevara, so I expect lots from this book.”
Malcolm Gladwell
“So much of Fountain’s work...reads with an easy grace.... [S]ometimes genius is anything but rarefied; sometimes it’s just the thing that emerges after twenty years of working at your kitchen table.”
San Francisco Chronicle
Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is not merely good; it’s Pulitzer Prize-quality good . . . A bracing, fearless and uproarious satire of how contemporary war is waged and sold to the American public.”
New York Times Book Review
“Brilliantly done . . . grand, intimate, and joyous.”
New York Times
“[An] inspired, blistering war novel…Though it covers only a few hours, the book is a gripping, eloquent provocation. Class, privilege, power, politics, sex, commerce and the life-or-death dynamics of battle all figure in Billy Lynn’s surreal game day experience.”
Washington Post
“A masterful echo of ‘Catch-22,’ with war in Iraq at the center. …a gut-punch of a debut novel…There’s hardly a false note, or even a slightly off-pitch one, in Fountain’s sympathetic, damning and structurally ambitious novel.”
The New Yorker
“Fountain’s excellent first novel follows a group of soldiers at a Dallas Cowboys game on Thanksgiving Day…Through the eyes of the titular soldier, Fountain creates a minutely observed portrait of a society with woefully misplaced priorities. [Fountain has] a pitch-perfect ear for American talk…”
Harper's Magazine
“Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is a big one. This is the brush-clearing Bush book we’ve been waiting for.”
The Daily Beast
“Biting, thoughtful, and absolutely spot-on. . . . This postmodern swirl of inner substance, yellow ribbons, and good(ish) intentions is at the core of Ben Fountain’s brilliant Bush-era novel.”
Huffington Post
“Ben Fountain combines blistering, beautiful language with razor-sharp insight…and has written a funny novel that provides skewering critiques of America’s obsession with sports, spectacle, and war.”
Sports Illustrated
“Seething, brutally funny…[Fountain] leaves readers with a fully realized band of brothers…Fountain’s readers will never look at an NFL Sunday, or at America, in quite the same way.”
Tampa Bay Times
“The Iraq war hasn’t yet had its Catch-22 or Slaughterhouse-Five, but Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is a contender… A wicked sense of humor, wonderful writing and, beneath the anger and outrage, a generous heart.”
Los Angeles Times
“Darkly comic…Rarely does such a ruminative novel close with such momentum.”
Minneapolis Star Tribune
“Fountain’s strength as a writer is that he not only can conjure up this all-too-realistic-sounding mob, but also the young believably innocent soul for our times, Specialist Billy Lynn. And from the first page I found myself rooting for him, often from the edge of my seat.”
The Rumpus
“[A] masterly . . . tightly structured book [with] a sprawling amount of drama and emotion.”
Shelf Awareness
“A truly wondrous first novel.”
Cleveland Plain Dealer
“While Fountain undoubtedly knows his Graham Greene and Paul Theroux, his excursions into foreign infernos have an innocence all their own. In between his nihilistic descriptions, a boyishness keeps peeking out, cracking one-liners and admiring the amazing if benighted scenery.”
The Millions
“Here is a novel that is deeply engaged with our contemporary world, timely and timeless at once. Plus, it’s such fun to read.”
Sacramento Bee
“The chasm between the reality and the glorification of war hasn’t been this surreal since Joseph Heller’s Catch-22.”
Philadelphia City Paper
“…wickedly affecting…Billy Lynn has courted some Catch-22 comparisons, and they’re well-earned. Fountain is a whiz at lining up plausible inanities and gut-twisting truths for the Bravos to suffer through.”
BookRiot
“[A] wonderfully readable book [which] does something similar to Why Are We in Vietnam?, asking hard questions about the cultural short-sightedness that contributed to our involvement in Iraq. As a veteran myself, I can attest that it’s spot on.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060885595
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/1/2012
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 248,262
  • Product dimensions: 6.44 (w) x 9.06 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Ben Fountain

Ben Fountain is the author of Brief Encounters with Che Guevara. He has received the PEN/Hemingway Award, the Barnes & Noble Discover Award for Fiction, and a Whiting Writers' Award, among other honors and awards. He and his family live in Dallas.

Biography

Ben Fountain's fiction has appeared in Harper's magazine, The Paris Review, and Zoetrope: All-Story, and he has been awarded an O. Henry Prize, a Pushcart Prize, and other honors. He is the fiction editor of Southwest Review and lives with his wife and their two children in Dallas, Texas.

Author biography courtesy of HarperCollins.

Good To Know

Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Fountain:

"The smartest thing I did in law school: asking my future wife to go out dancing with me. The smartest thing I did when practicing law: quitting. The smartest thing I've done in writing: following my own head and writing what I wanted to write, and nothing but."

"I think I was lucky to come of age in a place and time -- the American South in the 1960s and '70s -- when the machine hadn't completely taken over life. The natural world was still the world, and machines -- TV, telephone, cars -- were still more or less ancillary, and computers were unheard of in everyday life. I suppose I'm as much a drudge to technology as most anybody these days, but my sensibility was formed outside of the realm of the machine, and I don't think it will ever have quite the grip on me that it has on people who came of age later. So hopefully it will never run me quite as efficiently as it would had I been born 12 or 15 years later, and to the extent that's true maybe it means I have a few more options open to me. One hopes, anyway."

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Dallas, Texas
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1980; J.D., Duke University School of Law, 1983

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 74 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(42)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 74 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    Did you ever wonder about the war?

    I read fast. Really fast. Very few books slow me down. This book brought me to a standstill--and sent me back to read again. It knit the realities of combat to the realities of American civilian life. And with the same stitches, it bound the absurd fantasies of both experiences. It is no wonder that civilians who experience combat experience nothing the same way ever again. This slice of life was a story intricately spun and made into an uncomfortable but irresistible jacket. Thank you.

    19 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2012

    Having a somewhat loose connection to the military lifestyle, I

    Having a somewhat loose connection to the military lifestyle, I felt an instant connection to this book that goes deeper than a cursory glance just across the surface. It made BILLY LYNN’s LONG HALFTIME WALK real to me, yet I did have trouble initially getting into the story, because it’s told as much through flashbacks, bouncing in time from the present to the past, that I struggled initially with the author’s choice of storytelling. But once I caught on, I dove into the water headfirst, and I didn’t bother coming up for air.

    Sure, there are satirical elements to the story, and it presents a world that’s not all sugarplums and candy canes and apple pies, but it’s the world we currently live in, if not slightly exaggerated. And for me, that was most of the appeal of the novel.

    I loved the direct line of sight into the eyes of a soldier, a grunt and a squad that was suddenly blown up bigger than an atomic bomb because of the media attention, the Jumbotron, the Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders, and the Victory Tour. It’s a study in American excess, and it further cements the great American divide between the haves and the have nots.

    This novel is at times powerful, heartbreaking, funny, sad, but overall it’s a richly written piece of fiction that made me pause and reflect, if even just for a minute, at the direction our country has taken.

    Robert Downs
    Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 16, 2013

    This book is as good as the best reviews say it is. It's very mo

    This book is as good as the best reviews say it is. It's very moving and sad and insightful and revealing. What happens to the young, impressionable men we send to war is something we can't comprehend without the experience ourselves. This story helps reveal a lot about them and also a lot about ourselves and our responses to them. And most of it happens during one professional football game at Cowboys stadium. What a clever way to tell their story. I loved this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    One of my Top 10 for 2012

    Dark satire of war and the selling of war.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    Reminded me of Catch 22

    Reminded me of Catch 22

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Not so much a novel of the Iraq War as a novel of soldiers attem

    Not so much a novel of the Iraq War as a novel of soldiers attempting to understand the country they've enlisted to protect. There are comparisons drawn between Americans' commitment to their pastimes and their disinterest in the world around them, and Fountain's book, while making no real statements about the war, is happy to engage this larger, slower target. Humorous and touchingly written, Fountain' characters are believable and vivid, and surely they're the reason this novel made the Book Award shortlist. It didn't win, but as an effort to map a post-9/11 America, and the war we refused to examine, Bill Lynn wholly succeeds.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The title of this book sounds as if it should be a children&rsq

    The title of this book sounds as if it should be a children’s story – it suggests adventure, morality lessons, guidance, with an ending that leaves a restful “at peace” feeling. With the exceptions of this NOT being a children’s book (by any stretch) and the ending lending itself more toward deep discussion than rest, this is a book of adventure, morality and guidance. It asks the reader to consider the possibility that the wall behind the pretty paper may be, at its best, flimsy and to dare to look what it may be hiding.
    The ten members of “Bravo Squad” became famous when the embedded Fox News team attached to it for two weeks filmed the three minute, 43 second battle of Al-Ansakar Canal in Iraq. Eight members of the platoon are on the final day of a two week “Victory Tour,” spending it being “honored” at Texas Stadium during the halftime show of Thanksgiving game between the Cowboys and the Bears. After two weeks of such honors, he “Bravos” are ready for this Temporary Duty to be complete. The day is described through the eyes of 19-year-old William “Billy” Lynn, Silver Star recipient and old-soul philosopher.
    Mr. Fountain is talented in his ability to keep a complex story concisely focused and articulated quickly. The story is told as the day as it progresses with sufficient recalls, by Billy, to give him and the Bravos a history and development enough for him to become “real.” Billy observes life and its participants then opines of those observations with the authority of one who has faced The Ultimate and was gifted by that meeting with the clarity of thought and perspective far beyond his years. As he plays with his three-year-old nephew, he comes to an understanding of a God that is real, not a plastic sketch he had been offered when he was younger, “Divine spark, image of God, suffer the little children and all that – there’s real power when words attach to actual things.” (p. 74). The “actual” things he has seen have taught him a meaning of power, one that shows his present surroundings to be as false the god he was offered when he was younger.
    The author expertly uses a fictional setting to speak to present realities. He has a Texas billionaire orate about the evils from which America has saved Iraq and the rant could have been lifted from any present-day electoral speech by any Presidential Candidate (p. 118).
    The satire and barbs are so good and clear that the author either received permission from various political figures (unlikely) or he has a very good lawyer who is expert at defending against slander suits. He lays bare the excesses and cronyism, often using familiar names, upon our economy has come to depend and the complicity thereof we all bear in its success. The overall commentary the book offers is one of questioning where society is and how it managed to arrive there. Often humorous, deeply biting and profane in its profundity, this book is one that is in much need of being read and discussed. The book is centered upon a member of an active duty combat platoon, told as they interact with each other, therefore, the language is as would be expected – raw, graphic and not for those easily offended. There is also graphic description of battle and its results.
    The six hours of Billy’s life he shared on this particular Thanksgiving were enough for him to become a friend. I hope he writes more soon.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2013

    Superb

    With malice toward none.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 1, 2013

    This is an amazing anti-war book that embodies a certain essence

    This is an amazing anti-war book that embodies a certain essence of what it means to be an American in the 21st century. It took me a few false starts to get the rhythm of this story of class, race, and gender among many other things. Thought provoking and sadly funny--do not give up.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 26, 2013

    Excellent book. well written.

    Like being in a pinball machine of sensory elements. Great Book.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Well written, good read

    I loved this book. Some of the descriptive phrases are so powerful that you are transported into the storyline. I will read this book again.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 6, 2012

    Recommended reading

    Very entertaining.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2012

    OK

    I was disappointed overall. It sounded good from the write up of the story, but I found it to be very repetitive in terms of the characters. I'm glad I bought it as a daily special.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 5, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    "Catch 22" meets "Semi-Pro"

    The title of this book sounds as if it should be a children’s story – it suggests adventure, morality lessons, guidance, with an ending that leaves a restful “at peace” feeling. With the exceptions of this NOT being a children’s book (by any stretch) and the ending lending itself more toward deep discussion than rest, this is a book of adventure, morality and guidance. It asks the reader to consider the possibility that the wall behind the pretty paper may be, at its best, flimsy and to dare to look what it may be hiding.
    The ten members of “Bravo Squad” became famous when the embedded Fox News team attached to it for two weeks filmed the three minute, 43 second battle of Al-Ansakar Canal in Iraq. Eight members of the platoon are on the final day of a two week “Victory Tour,” spending it being “honored” at Texas Stadium during the halftime show of Thanksgiving game between the Cowboys and the Bears. After two weeks of such honors, he “Bravos” are ready for this Temporary Duty to be complete. The day is described through the eyes of 19-year-old William “Billy” Lynn, Silver Star recipient and old-soul philosopher.
    Mr. Fountain is talented in his ability to keep a complex story concisely focused and articulated quickly. The story is told as the day as it progresses with sufficient recalls, by Billy, to give him and the Bravos a history and development enough for him to become “real.” Billy observes life and its participants then opines of those observations with the authority of one who has faced The Ultimate and was gifted by that meeting with the clarity of thought and perspective far beyond his years. As he plays with his three-year-old nephew, he comes to an understanding of a God that is real, not a plastic sketch he had been offered when he was younger, “Divine spark, image of God, suffer the little children and all that – there’s real power when words attach to actual things.” (p. 74). The “actual” things he has seen have taught him a meaning of power, one that shows his present surroundings to be as false the god he was offered when he was younger.
    The author expertly uses a fictional setting to speak to present realities. He has a Texas billionaire orate about the evils from which America has saved Iraq and the rant could have been lifted from any present-day electoral speech by any Presidential Candidate (p. 118).
    The satire and barbs are so good and clear that the author either received permission from various political figures (unlikely) or he has a very good lawyer who is expert at defending against slander suits. He lays bare the excesses and cronyism, often using familiar names, upon our economy has come to depend and the complicity thereof we all bear in its success. The overall commentary the book offers is one of questioning where society is and how it managed to arrive there. Often humorous, deeply biting and profane in its profundity, this book is one that is in much need of being read and discussed. The book is centered upon a member of an active duty combat platoon, told as they interact with each other, therefore, the language is as would be expected – raw, graphic and not for those easily offended. There is also graphic description of battle and its results.
    The six hours of Billy’s life he shared on this particular Thanksgiving were enough for him to become a friend. I hope he writes more soon.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2012

    Great

    This is one of the best books i have ever read this is oneof the best

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2012

    Perfect Pitch

    It took awhile to get a feel for storyline, but thank God, I didn't give up. A terrific first novel! Should be in line for the National Book Award!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    To brainna

    My little pony res 3

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2014

    Riley to maddie

    Can i work here

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2014

    Logan

    Hades killed my mother to " protect me"

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2014

    I am Victor

    Ares destroyed my family

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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