×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Biochemical Basis of Pediatric Disease
     

Biochemical Basis of Pediatric Disease

by Kory M. Ward (Editor), Jocelyn M. Hicks, Nader Rifai
 

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Robert D. Steiner, MD, FAAP, FACMG (Oregon Health and Science University)
Description: This impressive collection of reviews on diseases in children has a unique emphasis on laboratory evaluation. I know of no similar books that review pediatrics while emphasizing laboratory testing. For that reason alone, this is a valuable resource.
Purpose: Although not expressed very clearly, the purpose of this book seems to be to guide clinicians through the process of the laboratory evaluation of sick children. The editors, for the most part, meet their objectives.
Audience: This book is written for clinicians caring for children. The text is an excellent resource for medical students, residents, and laboratorians. Laboratory directors who lack a clinical background would especially appreciate this book as a ready reference of pediatrics, written with a laboratory testing slant. The authors in the areas I know best—calcium and mineral metabolism, inborn errors of metabolism, and lipoprotein disorders—are well recognized and respected authorities in their fields.
Features: Most categories of diseases in children are covered. Each chapter, with a few exceptions, is really a comprehensive review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of diseases in children with an emphasis on laboratory testing. The inborn errors of metabolism and lipid disorders chapters are well written, concise, and nicely illustrated with tables and figures. The first chapter is an overview of laboratory testing in children. Throughout the text, excellent use is made of tables of differential diagnosis and reference ranges for results. There are some notable omissions in the text, and the chapters are not all-inclusive reviews. Neuromuscular disorders and infectious diseases are almost totally overlooked as is neonatal screening. Surely a test performed on every child born in developed countries is more deserving of a chapter than porphyria.
Assessment: Overall, I found this to be an excellent book, after I figured out its purpose. The title suggests a text on inborn errors of metabolism—wrong. The editors' and many contributors' backgrounds suggest a clinical chemistry textbook—wrong again. Molecular genetic testing is revolutionizing medical genetics, infectious diseases, oncology and other fields. If DNA testing is given broader treatment in the next edition, every pediatrician will need this book. It has the features of several books, namely Scriver's The Metabolic and Molecular Basis of Inherited Disease (McGraw-Hill, 1995), Berhman's Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics, 3rd Edition (WB Saunders, 1998), Johnson's Oski's Essential Pediatrics (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1997), Green's Pediatric Diagnosis: Interpretation of Symptoms and Signs in Children and Adolescents, 6th Edition (WB Saunders, 1998), and Wallach's Handbook of Interpretation of Diagnostic Tests (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1998). Notwithstanding the few shortcomings of this book, I think if there was a fire in my office, I might leave the rest of the books and grab this one.
3 Stars from Doody
Grant Morrow III
This book deals with the biochemical basis of pediatric disorders and is organized primarily by organ system. Because of the book's limited size, the discussions in any particular chapter cannot cover the field in detail. This is the second edition. The authors do not speak to the book's purpose nor the intended audience. The preface is written by an author who has not contributed to the book. It was difficult to determine a consistent audience when reading the various chapters of the book. Some areas are very basic and others deal with sophisticated molecular tests. As such, there does not appear to be a targeted audience. Most of the chapters use tables and charts for their primary illustrations although a number of drawings do exist. The references in many of the chapters have not been updated, but the table of contents is adequate and the cover of the book is rather attractive. The purpose of this book is difficult to pin down because it does not speak to any particular audience. The text is not extensive enough to be used as a reference book for the student or practitioner and it's its format does not emphasize presenting clinical findings or differential thinking. There is no coordination of the structure of the various chapters. This volume is not a text for library use and would fall short of a reference that a practitioner might use in the office. Students who wish to get an overview of pediatrics may find it of interest.
Robert D. Steiner
This impressive collection of reviews on diseases in children has a unique emphasis on laboratory evaluation. I know of no similar books that review pediatrics while emphasizing laboratory testing. For that reason alone, this is a valuable resource. Although not expressed very clearly, the purpose of this book seems to be to guide clinicians through the process of the laboratory evaluation of sick children. The editors, for the most part, meet their objectives. This book is written for clinicians caring for children. The text is an excellent resource for medical students, residents, and laboratorians. Laboratory directors who lack a clinical background would especially appreciate this book as a ready reference of pediatrics, written with a laboratory testing slant. The authors in the areas I know best--calcium and mineral metabolism, inborn errors of metabolism, and lipoprotein disorders--are well recognized and respected authorities in their fields. Most categories of diseases in children are covered. Each chapter, with a few exceptions, is really a comprehensive review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of diseases in children with an emphasis on laboratory testing. The inborn errors of metabolism and lipid disorders chapters are well written, concise, and nicely illustrated with tables and figures. The first chapter is an overview of laboratory testing in children. Throughout the text, excellent use is made of tables of differential diagnosis and reference ranges for results. There are some notable omissions in the text, and the chapters are not all-inclusive reviews. Neuromuscular disorders and infectious diseases are almost totally overlooked as is neonatalscreening. Surely a test performed on every child born in developed countries is more deserving of a chapter than porphyria. Overall, I found this to be an excellent book, after I figured out its purpose. The title suggests a text on inborn errors of metabolism--wrong. The editors' and many contributors' backgrounds suggest a clinical chemistry textbook--wrong again. Molecular genetic testing is revolutionizing medical genetics, infectious diseases, oncology and other fields. If DNA testing is given broader treatment in the next edition, every pediatrician will need this book. It has the features of several books, namely Scriver's The Metabolic and Molecular Basis of Inherited Disease (McGraw-Hill, 1995), Berhman's Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics, 3rd Edition (WB Saunders, 1998), Johnson's Oski's Essential Pediatrics (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1997), Green's Pediatric Diagnosis: Interpretation of Symptoms and Signs in Children and Adolescents, 6th Edition (WB Saunders, 1998), and Wallach's Handbook of Interpretation of Diagnostic Tests (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1998). Notwithstanding the few shortcomings of this book, I think if there was a fire in my office, I might leave the rest of the books and grab this one.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781890883010
Publisher:
American Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc.
Publication date:
07/01/1998
Edition description:
3RD
Pages:
663
Product dimensions:
7.03(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.33(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews