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Biographical Sketches of the Bench and Bar of South Carolina
     

Biographical Sketches of the Bench and Bar of South Carolina

by John Belton O'Neall
 

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The book has no illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website (GeneralBooksClub.com). You can also preview excerpts of the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can

Overview

The book has no illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website (GeneralBooksClub.com). You can also preview excerpts of the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Original Publisher: Charleston, S.C., S.G. Courtenay

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026638468
Publisher:
S.G. Courtenay & Co.
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

Read an Excerpt


JOHN GADSDEN. John Gadsden was the second son of Catharine and Philip Gadsden, and was born on the 4th of March, 1787. His brother, the Bishop of the Diocese of the.Protestant Episcopal Church, in South Carolina, preceded him, by birth, a year or more. James Gadsden, our recent Minister to Mexico, was the next junior to both. In his untiring energies, and in the footsteps of his grandfather, he has not overlooked the fame which links his name with his progenitor. He is the eldest surviving brother of a once numerous family, equally divided between eight sons and eight daughters, of whom there remain one sister and six brothers. With this brief episode we pass on to the narrative: By the paternal and maternal side, these " Iria juncta in uno" inherited the good name of distinguished and venerated patriots of the Revolution. Gen. Christopher Gadsden, and John Edwards—the cavalier and the Puritan, eminent merchants, of spotless integrity, in the province of South Carolina—have left to their posterity, a part from their Revolutionary prestige, an imperishable name. In their devotion to the cause of American Indepen-' dence, they were not surpassed, and need no cenotaph to embalm their memories. The inscription stands in bold relief, on the page of history: of indomitable spirits, inflexible perseverance, steadiness of purpose, enduring firmness, their pledges were those of "fortune, life and honor," redeemed in the success of the struggle, which secured the independence of the colonies. Subsequent to the siege and surrender of Charleston, in 1780, they, with other defenders of the commonwealth, were transferred to prison-ships, or transported, as rebels, to St.Augustine. It was thought dangerous to leave them on parole, in their abiding city, or to exchange them as prison...

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