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Biologic Effects of Light 1998: Proceedings of a Symposium Basel, Switzerland November 1-3, 1998
     

Biologic Effects of Light 1998: Proceedings of a Symposium Basel, Switzerland November 1-3, 1998

by Michael F. Holick
 

It was the goal of the Fifth International Arnold Rikli Symposium on t he Biologic Effects of Light, held in Basel, Switzerland, on November 1-3, 1998, to review the history of phototherapy and have some of the world's leading experts on the biologic effects of light provide new p erspectives on the positive and negative effects of light. The general topics

Overview

It was the goal of the Fifth International Arnold Rikli Symposium on t he Biologic Effects of Light, held in Basel, Switzerland, on November 1-3, 1998, to review the history of phototherapy and have some of the world's leading experts on the biologic effects of light provide new p erspectives on the positive and negative effects of light. The general topics included a broad range of biologic effects of sunlight, artifi cial ultraviolet radiation and electromagnetic radiation. Special sess ions on radiation and vitamin D and bone health, photoimmunology, biop ositive effects of UV radiation, effects of electromagnetic currents a nd fields, and ocular and non-ocular regulation of circadian rhythms a nd melatonin, should be of particular interest to readers of Biologic Effects of Light.

Editorial Reviews

5 Stars! from Doody
Patricia L. Wong
This is a compilation of the talks at the fifth international Arnold Riki Symposium on the Biologic Effects of Light. Nearly 500 pages, this hot pink covered textbook is a presentation of the latest research on virtually every aspect of ultraviolet radiation on biologic systems. Academicians and basic researchers involved in studying photoimmunology, radiation and Vitamin D, the effects of electromagnetic fields on cellular systems, and the effects of light on circadian rhythm and mental disorders will love this book. It is aimed at the sophisticated scientist who has an extensive background in immunology and basic science. The information presented will most appeal to researchers with a specific focus as shown by the following chapter titles: ""Ultraviolet light requirements of panther chameleons in captivity"" and ""The evaluation of the Vitamin D status in the green iguana."" There are papers on clinically relevant issues that the hard-core clinician may find interesting. I liked the discussion of the cellular mechanism of how tretinoin prevents ultraviolet skin damage by preventing activation of the c-Jun gene. The epidemologic studies suggesting that sunnier climates may play a protective role against colorectal and breast cancer were worth reading. As dermatologists, we too often focus on the potential dangers of photoaging and skin cancers from the sun, leaving the patient with the impression that ultraviolet radiation is always harmful. There is compelling research showing that Vitamin D has a lowering effect on blood pressure. All of these positive effects of the sun and Vitamin D production in the skin curiously enough are difficult to achieve given the regular U. S.diet and current recommended daily allowances of Vitamin D, which leaves the best way to achieve these effects is to go outside in the sun. This is a wonderful basic science book on the effects of ultraviolet radiation on us and our world. I highly recommend it be included in medical libraries and for scientists and researchers studying the subject.
Booknews
The 74 papers review the history of thought and practice of using sunlight and artificial light as therapy for various conditions, an approach that fell into relative obscurity with the rise of pharmacology. Among the topics are relationships among illumination, activity, and sleep patterns; the molecular pathophysiology of photoaging in human skin and the effect of all- retinoic acid; what is known and should be known about ultraviolet radiation and HIV infection; epidemiology and the role of sunlight, betacarotene for preventing ultraviolet-induced skin damage; solar ultraviolet radiation expose of infants and small children in Townsville, Australia; what effect ultra-low frequency magnetic fields have on the blood-brain barrier; the effect of electromagnetic field exposure on the formation of DNA single-strand breaks; and the lack of dose- response effects of nocturnal light on menstrual cycle length. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Patricia Wong, MD (Private Practice)
Description: This is a compilation of the talks at the fifth international Arnold Riki Symposium on the Biologic Effects of Light.
Purpose: Nearly 500 pages, this hot pink covered textbook is a presentation of the latest research on virtually every aspect of ultraviolet radiation on biologic systems.
Audience: Academicians and basic researchers involved in studying photoimmunology, radiation and Vitamin D, the effects of electromagnetic fields on cellular systems, and the effects of light on circadian rhythm and mental disorders will love this book. It is aimed at the sophisticated scientist who has an extensive background in immunology and basic science.
Features: The information presented will most appeal to researchers with a specific focus as shown by the following chapter titles: "Ultraviolet light requirements of panther chameleons in captivity" and "The evaluation of the Vitamin D status in the green iguana." There are papers on clinically relevant issues that the hard-core clinician may find interesting. I liked the discussion of the cellular mechanism of how tretinoin prevents ultraviolet skin damage by preventing activation of the c-Jun gene. The epidemologic studies suggesting that sunnier climates may play a protective role against colorectal and breast cancer were worth reading. As dermatologists, we too often focus on the potential dangers of photoaging and skin cancers from the sun, leaving the patient with the impression that ultraviolet radiation is always harmful. There is compelling research showing that Vitamin D has a lowering effect on blood pressure. All of these positive effects of the sun and Vitamin D production in the skin curiously enough are difficult to achieve given the regular U. S. diet and current recommended daily allowances of Vitamin D, which leaves the best way to achieve these effects is to go outside in the sun.
Assessment: This is a wonderful basic science book on the effects of ultraviolet radiation on us and our world. I highly recommend it be included in medical libraries and for scientists and researchers studying the subject.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781461372967
Publisher:
Springer US
Publication date:
04/30/2013
Edition description:
Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1999
Pages:
491
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.04(d)

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