Biosocial Criminology / Edition 1

Biosocial Criminology / Edition 1

by Anthony Walsh
     
 

ISBN-10: 1583605320

ISBN-13: 9781583605325

Pub. Date: 08/01/2001

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Ideal for use, either as a second text in a standard criminology course, or for a discrete course on biosocial perspectives, this book of original chapters breaks new and important ground for ways today's criminologists need to think more broadly about the crime problem.  See more details below

Overview

Ideal for use, either as a second text in a standard criminology course, or for a discrete course on biosocial perspectives, this book of original chapters breaks new and important ground for ways today's criminologists need to think more broadly about the crime problem.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781583605325
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
08/01/2001
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
281
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Forewordiii
Prefacevii
Chapter 1Why Criminology Needs Biology1
Sociology Contra Biology2
Criminology and Biology11
Chapter 2Behavior Genetics and Criminology23
What Are Genes?24
Behavior-Genetic Research Designs Versus SSSM Designs26
The Concept of Heritability28
Gene/Environment Interaction and Correlation38
Behavior Genetics and Criminal Behavior40
Typical Objections to Behavior Genetics' Assumptions and Research Designs44
Genes and Human Freedom47
Chapter 3Evolutionary Psychology and the Origins of Criminal Behavior49
The Relevance of Evolutionary Theory to Social Science50
Natural Selection51
Thinking in Evolutionary Terms53
The Environment of Evolutionary Adaptation57
Natural is Good?58
The Evolution of Criminal Behavior59
Specific Evolutionary Theories of Crime69
Behavior Genetics and Evolutionary Psychology73
Chapter 4The Neurohormonal Sciences and Crime75
The Basic Brain75
Neural Selectionism and Constructivism78
The Brain and Its Environment81
Why Bonding and Attachment are Neurologically Important84
Abuse, Neglect, and the Developing Brain87
Chapter 5Anomie/Strain Theory and Status97
The Social Structural Tradition97
Intelligence and SES107
Temperament and SES111
Chapter 6Differential Association/Social Learning Theories and Adolescence121
The Basics of Differential Association Theory121
Learning, Attitudes, and Behavior126
The Basics of Social Learning Theory126
Gangs and Modernity129
Differential Association/Social Learning (DA/SL) and Gene/Environment (G/E) Correlation131
Biosocial Perspectives on Adolescent Antisocial Behavior139
Chapter 7Control Theories and the Family145
Social Control Theory146
Gottfredson and Hirschi's Low Self-Control Theory149
The Family: Nursery of Human Nature152
The Evolution of the Family154
The Evolution of the Proximate Mechanisms of Attachment155
The Evolutionary Context of Child Abuse and Neglect163
The Biology of Low Self-Control165
Age in Self-Control Theory167
Chapter 8Human Ecology/Social Disorganization and Race169
Social Disorganization171
Modern Ecological Theory: People or Places?174
Race and Crime: Explanations178
Environmentally Contingent Strategies: The Sex Ratio and Illegitimacy183
The Ecology of the Inner City188
Testosterone, Dominance, and Honor Subcultures192
Chapter 9Critical and Feminist Theories and Conflict195
Are Critical Theories Incompatible with Biology?196
Marx's Concept of Human Nature197
Feminist Criminology204
Evolutionary Contributions to Understanding Rape and Domestic Violence214
Chapter 10Looking Back and Looking Forward221
What Have We Learned from Biosocial Perspectives?222
Summarizing the Integration of Biosocial and Traditional Criminological Theories224
Biosocial Criminology and Ethics228
References233
Index271
Biography281

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