Biotic Feedbacks in the Global Climatic System: Will the Warming Feed the Warming?

Overview

The problem of global warming is among the most intensely studied and debated topics in ecology and environmental science. But one possible contributor to global warming—biotic feedback—has until now not been addressed with any serious, sustained attention. Featuring papers prepared for a meeting held at Woods Hole to explore the topic, this book provides for the first time a comprehensive overview of the many issues associated with interactions between biota and global warming. With contributions from ...

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Overview

The problem of global warming is among the most intensely studied and debated topics in ecology and environmental science. But one possible contributor to global warming—biotic feedback—has until now not been addressed with any serious, sustained attention. Featuring papers prepared for a meeting held at Woods Hole to explore the topic, this book provides for the first time a comprehensive overview of the many issues associated with interactions between biota and global warming. With contributions from internationally respected scholars in the field, the book will prove invaluable to students and researchers in ecology, climatology, and environmental science.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The 23 authoritative papers. . .are aptly enhanced by graphs, tables, and bibliographies." —"Choice

"This book presents a multiauthored review of various aspects of the global carbon cycle, primarily contemporary but also ranging over recent earth history. The book consists of 23 chapters and emphasizes how climate change from increasing greenhouse gases, especially CO2 might affect the carbon cycle and feedbacks on atmospheric carbon dioxide. This focus is indicated by the book's subtitle, 'Will the Warming Feed the Warming?' This book is of unusually high quality for a compilation of workshop papers...[recommended] to anyone who would want to read it as a still largely up-to-date summary of the issues that must be considered to understand the global cazrbon cycle and its response to climate change."—Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

"A colorful, inspiring variety [of topics], fully preserving contrasts among experts. . . .If you wish to learn about the origins and the diversity of arguments in this controversy, read this book." —Journal of Environmental Quality

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195086409
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 1/28/1995
  • Pages: 436
  • Product dimensions: 6.37 (w) x 9.56 (h) x 1.34 (d)

Meet the Author

Woods Hole Research Center

University of Hawaii

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Table of Contents

PART I: Global Warming: Perspectives form Land and Sea
1. Biotic Feedbacks from the Warming of the Earth, G.M. Woodwell
2. Global Climatic Change: Climatically Important Biogenic Gases and Feedbacks, F.T. Mackenzie
PART II: Biotic Processes and Potential Feedbacks
A. Plants and Plant Communities
3. Plant Physiological Responses to Elevated CO2, Temperature, Air Pollution, and UV-B Radiation, L.H. Allen and J.S. Amthor
4. On the Potential for a CO2 Fertilization Effect in Forests: Estimates of the Biotic Growth Factor, Based on 58 Controlled-Exposure Studies, S.D. Wullschleger, W.M. Post, and A.W. King
5. Indicators of Climatic and Biospheric Change: Evidence from Tree-Rings, G.C. Jacoby and Rosanne D. D'Arrigo
6. Global Climate Change: Disturbance Regimes and Biospheric Feedbacks of Temperate and Boreal Forests, W.A. Kurz et al.
7. Permafrost and Vegetation Response to Global Warming in North Eurasia, A.A. Velichko et al.
B. Soils
8. Soil Respiration and Changes in Soil Carbon Stocks, W.H. Schlesinger
9. The Biogeochemistry of Northern Peatlands and Its Possible Responses to Global Warming, E. Gorham
10. Methane Output form Natural and Quasi-Natural Sources: A Review of the Potential for Change and for Biotic and Abiotic Feedbacks, E.G. Nisbet and B. Ingham
11. Linkages Between Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling and Their Implications for Storage of Carbon in Terrestrial Ecosystems, E. A. Davidson
C. Oceans and Estuaries
12. Biofeedback in the Ocean in Response to Climate Change, G.T. Rowe and F.G. Baldauf
13. Net Carbon Metabolism of Oceanic Margins and Estuaries: Estimates of Steady-State Conditions, and Speculations about Anthropomorphic Perturbations of that Steady State, S.V. Smith
14. Biogenic Dimethyl Sulphide, Marine Aerosol and Climate: Evidence For and Against the Existence of a Climate-Stabilizing Feedback Mechanism, R.J. Carlson
15. Implications of Increased Solar UVB for Aquatic Ecosystems, R.C. Smith
PART III: Global Carbon Budgets, Models, and Geophysical Constraints
A. Terrestrial and Oceanic Interactions
16. Modelling Interactions of Carbon Dioxide, Forests, and Climate, R.D. Luxmoore and D.D. Baldocchi
17. Vegetation Geography and Global Carbon Storage Changes, I.C. Prentice and M.T. Sykes
18. CO2-Climate Feedbacks: Aspects of Detection, I.G. Enting
B. Modelling the Carbon Sink
19. Effects of Land-use Change, Surface Temperature, and CO2 Concentration on Terrestrial Stores of Carbon, R.A. Houghton
20. Storage Versus Flux Budgets: The Terrestrial Uptake of CO2 During the 1980s, P.P. Tans, I.Y. Fung, and I.G. Enting
21. Perturbations to the Biospheric Carbon Cycle: Uncertainties in the Estimates, I.Y. Fung
PART IV: Biotic Feedbacks in the Global Climatic System
22. What We Need to Know: Some Priorities for Research on Biotic Feedbacks in a Changing Biosphere, W.D. Billings
23. Will the Warming Feed the Warming?, G.M. Woodwell and R.T. Mackenzie

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