Bippity Bop Barbershop by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley, E. B. Lewis |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Bippity Bop Barbershop

Bippity Bop Barbershop

4.5 2
by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley, E. B. Lewis
     
 

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In this companion book to the bestselling I Love My Hair, a young boy, Miles, makes his first trip to the barbershop with his father. Like most little boys, he is afraid of the sharp scissors, the buzzing razor, and the prospect of picking a new hairstyle. But with the support of his dad, the barber, and the other men in the barbershop, Miles bravely sits

Overview

In this companion book to the bestselling I Love My Hair, a young boy, Miles, makes his first trip to the barbershop with his father. Like most little boys, he is afraid of the sharp scissors, the buzzing razor, and the prospect of picking a new hairstyle. But with the support of his dad, the barber, and the other men in the barbershop, Miles bravely sits through his first haircut. Written in a reassuring tone with a jazzy beat and illustrated with graceful, realistic watercolors, this book captures an important rite of passage for boys and celebrates African-American identity.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The light-dappled watercolor paintings give the scenes a real sense of place while bringing the characters to life through a sensitive depiction of expressions, gestures, and body language. A child-centered story, well paced and beautifully illustrated." -Booklist (starred review)


Publishers Weekly
What Natasha Anastasia Tarpley did for the mother-daughter bond in I Love My Hair! she now does for father and son in Bippity Bop Barbershop, illus. by E.B. Lewis. One full-bleed watercolor spread depicts three generations of men draped in purple barber's capes, each with his own distinguished hairstyle. ( Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Rites of passage in a child's life are appealing subjects for picture books, and that is the case in this tale of a boy's first haircut. Tarpley's I Love My Hair! (Little, Brown, 1998) celebrates the positive self-image and cultural identity of African-American girls, and Bippity Bop does the same for boys. Miles is nervous about visiting the barber for his first "official" haircut; he's afraid that the buzzing clippers will hurt, and he doesn't know what kind of cut to request. The descriptions of Miles trying to be "brave" are labored and unconvincing. Happily, the resolution of his hairstyle dilemma rings true: he selects a cut just like his daddy's. Miles and Dad leave the shop with identical haircuts, sharing high-fives, "two cool cats" walking to the rhythm of a "bippity bop" beat. Lewis's delightfully fluid watercolor illustrations get everything just right. The book is filled with cheerful and loving scenes of home and community, and remarkably expressive portrayals of men going about their business, tending shop, or awaiting their turns in the barber chair. With its depictions of dreadlocks, Afros, and even gleaming bald pates, Bippety Bop adds diversity to the small but growing niche of multicultural books that celebrate hair.-Mary Ann Carcich, Mattituck-Laurel Public Library, Mattituck, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Tarpley and Lewis return to the theme of their first collaboration: I Love My Hair (1997). In this case, it is the occasion of a young man's first official haircut. Tarpley is very sharp in catching the moods and rituals of the barbershop. Like the best of such places, this shop has a group of regulars, warm in each other's company, cajoling, exuding camaraderie. Miles, the first-timer, an African-American boy, is in the company of his father, who is one of the regulars. Tarpley works the rite-of-passage angle, but not overly; she understands that the atmospherics are what count: "Jazz music, loud voices, and laughter blend with the buzzzzzzz of clippers and the soft sweesh-sweesh whisper of scissors." All the gents have advised Miles to "be brave," which of course gives him a mild case of the shim-shams when the clippers touch the back of his neck for the first time. But his dad is there to offer some soothing advice and the cut proceeds. Miles exits to a round of high-fives and those cherished words from the barber: "See you next time." There aren't many of these safe harbors left out there in the everyday world, and Tarpley celebrates well their survival. And their steadiness and warmth are equally applauded in Lewis's sure-handed watercolors-Miles is totally adorable-inviting enough to make readers want to go out and get a trim. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316033824
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
01/01/2009
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
108,897
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Natasha Anastasia Tarpley is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and numerous other awards.

E.B. Lewis is the illustrator of two Corretta Scott King Honor Books, including The Bat Boy and His Violin by Gavin Curtis and Talkin' About Bessie: The Story of Aviator Elizabeth Coleman by Nikki Grimes.

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Bippity Bop Barbershop 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
AuthorKellyMoran More than 1 year ago
Author Natasha Anastasia Tarpley is the author of the children¿s book, I Love My Hair, and author of the adult books, Girl in the Mirror and Testimony. She is the winner of the 1999 Black Board Children¿s Book of the Year, amongst other awards. She resides in New York.
Illustrator E.B. Lewis is the illustrator for the children¿s books: I Love My Hair, The Bat Boy and His Violin, and Down the Road- Which was named a Notable Book for Children by the American Literary Association. His work is frequently exhibited in galleries throughout the U.S. He resides in New Jersey.
This children¿s book, directed to kids 2-6, follows Miles and Daddy through their everyday morning rituals, with a surprise- Miles is getting his first haircut!
I found this to be a delightful book. The illustrations, done in watercolor, are just beautiful and eye-catching. I think this should be a necessity in every salon and barbershop that sees children. It not only displays the great relationship and routine between father and son, but shows kids how getting a haircut is not so scary. It addresses fear on their level and works through it.
Bippity Bop Barbershop is a beautifully illustrated and superbly written children¿s story!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book by E.B. Lewis and Natasha A. Tarpley, is well written and the watercolor is done good. I would recommend this book to little children, and some teenagers who are having trouble being brave. This book also tells the importance of looking good and taking care of your appearance.Bippity Bop Barber shop is a great book!