Birds and Climate Change

Birds and Climate Change

by Luo Yiqi, Hal Caswell
     
 

ISBN-10: 0120139359

ISBN-13: 9780120139354

Pub. Date: 11/30/2004

Publisher: Elsevier Science

Advances in Ecological Research, first published in 1962, is one of Academic Press's most successful and prestigious series. In 1999, the Institute for Scientific Information released figures showing that the serial has an Impact Factor of 9.6, with a half life of 10.0 years, placing it 1st in the highly competitive category of Ecology.
The Editors have

Overview

Advances in Ecological Research, first published in 1962, is one of Academic Press's most successful and prestigious series. In 1999, the Institute for Scientific Information released figures showing that the serial has an Impact Factor of 9.6, with a half life of 10.0 years, placing it 1st in the highly competitive category of Ecology.
The Editors have always striven to provide a wide range of top-quality papers on all aspects of ecology, such as animal/plant, physiology/population/community, landscape and ecosystem ecology. Eclectic volumes in the serial are supplemented by thematic volumes on such topics as Estuaries and Ancient Lakes.
Now edited by Dr Hal Caswell, of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Advances in Ecological Research continues to publish topical and important reviews, interpreting ecology as widely as in the past, to include all material that contributes to our understanding of the field.
Praise for the Series

"Without exception the papers are well and attractively written and together constitute an important and stimulating contribution to the modern science of ecology." (NATURE)


"This series should certainly serve as an effective means of keeping abreast of the major advances in this challenging and growing field." (PHYTOLOGIA)

Author Biography: Hal Caswell, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780120139354
Publisher:
Elsevier Science
Publication date:
11/30/2004
Series:
Advances in Ecological Research Series
Pages:
276
Product dimensions:
0.69(w) x 6.14(h) x 9.21(d)

Table of Contents

Contributors to Volume 33v
Prefacevii
The Evolutionary Ecology of Carnivorous Plants
I.Summary2
II.Introduction2
A.Evolution and Distribution of Carnivorous Plants3
B.Cost-Benefit Models for the Evolution of Botanical Carnivory4
C.Carnivorous Plants as Phytotelmata4
D.Scope of this Review5
III.Population Biology of Carnivorous Plants6
A.Demography of Pitcher Plants6
B.Nitrogen Deposition and the Demography of Pitcher Plants10
C.Demographic Consequences of Preformation and Delayed Reproduction16
D.Directions for Future Research23
IV.Coexistence of Carnivorous and Noncarnivorous Plants26
A.Disturbance-Mediated Colonization27
B.Disturbance-Regulated Prey Capture28
C.Disturbance-Regulated Storage29
D.Directions for Future Research30
V.Plant-Insect Interactions33
A.Large-Scale Phenology and Pollination Ecology of Pinguicula vallisneriifolia34
B.Small-Scale Differences in Phenology and Pollination Ecology35
C.Scale-Independent Patterns in Phenology and Pollination38
D.Gene Flow Within and Between Populations38
E.Directions for Future Research40
VI.Phytotelmata41
A.The Inquiline Community of Sarracenia purpurea42
B.Trophic Interactions in Sarracenia purpurea-Inquiline Communities44
C.Metapopulation and Metacommunity Dynamics in Sarracenia purpurea-Inquiline Communities48
D.Assembly of Sarracenia purpurea-Inquiline Communities53
E.Short-Term Evolutionary Change in Sarracenia purpurea-Inquiline Communities57
F.Directions for Future Research63
VII.Conclusions: Are Carnivorous Plants Model Systems for Ecological Research?63
Acknowledgments64
References64
Trophic Interactions in Population Cycles of Voles and Lemmings: A Model-Based Synthesis
I.Summary76
II.Introduction76
A.A Modeling Framework Linking Population Dynamics and Demography79
B.Trophic Interactions in Rodent Population Dynamics--Background79
III.Characteristics of Rodents and their Food Resources and Predators83
A.Northern Rodents83
B.Microtus-like Caricature and its Food Web84
C.Lemming-like Caricature and its Food Web85
IV.A Trophic Population Model86
A.The Overall Structure of the Models86
B.The Rodent Model94
C.Predator--Prey Interactions95
D.The Specialist Predator Model98
E.The Generalist Predator Model99
F.The Vegetation Model for Voles102
G.The Effect of Common Prey on the Survival of Two Interacting Predators104
H.The Lemming Model106
I.Parameter Values111
J.The Basic Analyses of Model Predicted Dynamics119
V.Results and Discussion120
A.Emerging Dynamics120
B.Comparison with Observed Rodent Dynamics127
C.Comparison with Earlier Theoretical Models136
D.Two Scenarios--Gradients in Fennoscandia and Hokkaido139
VI.Conclusion144
A.What Have we Learnt?144
B.Towards a General Trophic Theory of Rodent Dynamics146
C.What Next?146
Acknowledgments147
References148
Scale Effects and Extrapolation in Ecological Experiments
I.Summary161
II.Introduction162
III.How Often Do Experimental Results Depend on Arena Size?164
IV.Extrapolation from Small to Large Systems167
A.Defining the Scale of Interest167
B.Matching Experiments with the Scale of Interest--Dimensional Analysis168
C.Extrapolation when Responses Vary with Arena Size171
D.Mechanisms Causing Scale-Dependence172
E.Scaling Models182
F.Using Scaling Models to Identify Critical Scales and Scale Domains192
V.Extrapolation by Combining Many Small-Scale Measurements196
A.Statistics as a Framework for Extrapolation in Field Experiments196
B.Sample Experiments, System-Unit Experiments, and Aggregation Error197
C.How to Quantify Heterogeneity199
VI.Concluding Remarks200
Acknowledgments201
References202
Cumulative List of Titles215
Index221

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