The Birds of Ecuador: Field Guide,Volume II / Edition 1

The Birds of Ecuador: Field Guide,Volume II / Edition 1

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by Robert S. Ridgely, Paul J. Greenfield
     
 

ISBN-10: 0801487218

ISBN-13: 9780801487217

Pub. Date: 06/28/2001

Publisher: Cornell University Press

The Birds of Ecuador comprehensively treats the nearly 1600 species of birds that can be found in mainland Ecuador. The authors describe Ecuador this way: "One of the wonders of the natural world. Nowhere else is such incredible avian diversity crammed into such a small country. . . . Birds are, happily, numerous in many parts of Ecuador: even the

Overview

The Birds of Ecuador comprehensively treats the nearly 1600 species of birds that can be found in mainland Ecuador. The authors describe Ecuador this way: "One of the wonders of the natural world. Nowhere else is such incredible avian diversity crammed into such a small country. . . . Birds are, happily, numerous in many parts of Ecuador: even the downtown parks of the big cities such as Quito and Guayaquil host their complement."

Volume II, the field guide volume of this two-volume set, contains 96 full-color plates and facing pages of descriptive text, a color map of Ecuador, along with two line drawings of bird anatomy, 115 silhouette outlines, and nearly 1600 distribution maps. All species are illustrated in full color, including migrants and vagrants and visually distinctive subspecies. The text focuses on the field identification aspects of each species, including their behavior, vocalizations, and nest appearance.

The two volumes of The Birds of Ecuador are available separately or may be purchased as a slipcased set.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801487217
Publisher:
Cornell University Press
Publication date:
06/28/2001
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
768
Sales rank:
477,655
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

Plan of the Book
Beginning With Birds
Color Plates

Tinamiformes
Tinamidae - Tinamous

Podicipediformes
Podicipedidae - Grebes

Sphenisciformes
Spheniscidae - Penguins

Procellariilormes
Diomedeidae - Albatrosses
Procellariidae - Shearwaters and Petrels
Hydrobatidae - Storm-Petrels

Pelecaniformes
Phaethontidae - Tropicbirds
Fregatidae - Frigatebirds
Sulidae - Boobies and Gannets
Phalacrocoracidae - Cormorants and Shags
Anhingidae - Darters
Pelecanidae - Pelicans

Anseriformes
Anhimidae - Screamers
Anatidae - Ducks, Geese, and Swans

Phoenicopteriformes
Phoenicopteridae - Flamingos

Ciconiilormes
Ardeidae - Herons, Bitterns, and Egrets
Threskiornithidae - Ibises and Spoonbills
Ciconiidae - Storks
Cathartidae - American Vultures

Falconiformes
Accipitridae - Kites, Eagles, Hawks, and Osprey
Falconidae - Falcons and Caracaras

Galliformes
Cracidae - Curassows, Guans, and Chachalacas
Odontophoridae - New World Quails

Gruiformes
Rallidae - Rails, Gallinules, and Coots
Eurypygidae - Sunbittern
Heliornithidae - Finfoots
Aramidae - Limpkin
Psophiidae - Trumpeters

Charadriiformes
Jacanidae - Jacanas
Scolopacidae - Sandpipers, Snipes, and Phalaropes
Thinocoridae - Seedsnipes
Burhinidae - Thick-knees
Haematopodidae - Oystercatchers
Recurvirostridae - Stilts and Avocets
Charadriidae - Plovers and Lapwings
Stercorariidae - Skuas and Jaegers
Laridae - Gulls and Terns
Rynchopidae - Skimmers

Columbiformes
Columbidae - Pigeons and Doves

Psillaciformes
Psittacidae - Parrots and Macaws

Cuculiformes
Cuculidae - Cuckoos and Anis
Opisthocomidae - Hoatzin

Slrioiformes
Tytonidae - Barn Owls
Strigidae - Typical Owls

Caprimulgiformes
Steatornithidae - Oilbird
Nyctibiidae - Potoos
Caprimulgidae - Nightjars and Nighthawks

Apodilormes
Apodidae - Swifts
Trochilidae - Hummingbirds

Trogoniformes
Trogonidae - Trogons and Quetzals

Coraciiformes
Alcedinidae - Kingfishers
Momotidae - Motmots

Piciformes
Galbiilidae - Jacamars
Bucconidae - Puffbirds
Capitonidae - New World Barbets
Ramphastidae - Toucans
Picidae - Woodpeckers and Piculets

Passerilormes
Furnariidae - Ovenbirds
Dendrocolaptidae - Woodcreepers
Thamnophilidae - Typical Antbirds
Formicariidae - Antthrushes and Antpittas
Conopophagidae - Gnateaters
Rhinocryptidae - Tapaculos
Tyrannidae - Tyrant Flycatchers
Cotingidae - Cotingas
Pipridae - Manakins
Corvidae - Crows, Jays, and Magpies
Vireonidae - Vireos, Peppershrikes, and Shrike-Vireos
Turdidae - Thrushes
Mimidae - Mockingbirds and Thrashers
Cinclidae - Dippers
Hirundinidae - Swallows and Martins
Troglodytidae - Wrens
Polioptilidae - Gnatcatchers and Gnatwrens
Motacillidae - Pipits and Wagtails
Parulidae - New World Warblers
Thraupidae - Tanagers, Honeycrccpers, Bananaquit, and Plushcap
Cardinalidac - Saltators, Grosbeaks, and Cardinals
Embcnzidae - Emherizine Finches
Icteridae - American Orioles and Blackbirds
Fringillidae - Cardueline Finches
Passeridae - Old World Sparrows

Bibliography
Index of English Names
Index of Scientific Names

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The Birds of Ecuador: Field Guide,Volume II 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first field guide to the birds of Ecuador, a small South American country with an amazing 1600 species of birds. The text, focusing on identification and describing appearance, habitat, habits, and voice, is extremely detailed and well-written. The illustrations on the 96 plates are among the finest of any field guide anywhere. Unlike almost all bird books for countries in the tropics, all are by one artist, which provides consistency. The guide makes the identification of difficult families like flycatchers or antbirds or Ecuador's 132 species of hummingbirds easier than ever. (Or at least less impossible!) Unlike other South American guides, all species, including migrants, are illustrated, and all in color. The 1600 species distribution maps are not at the level of North American maps, but they are a big step forward. It is convenient that they are with the corresponding text, with altitude information (critical for the Andes) attached. Since Ecuador has about half of the species in South America, this book will be valuable for anyone looking at birds in the Amazon basin or northern South America. Note that the field guide is volume 2 of the set. Volume I has detailed information on taxonomy, status, and especially occurence and distribution within Ecuador, plus general information about geography and ornithology, which would have made the field guide impossibly large. (It's massive as is.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must have for the tourist who wants to hike and see some of the more remote areas of Ecuador. Pictures are brilliant