×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Birds of Michigan
     

Birds of Michigan

4.8 6
by Charles Black, Gregory Kennedy
 

See All Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 1551053365

ISBN-13: 9781551053363

Pub. Date: 06/02/2003

Publisher: Lone Pine Publishing


Learn all about Michigan's top 320 most notable bird species. Full-color illustrations complement detailed accounts, color-coded pages that cover habitat, nesting, feeding, vocal sounds, best sites for viewing, and tips for distinguishing from similar species. Illustrations and photographs make identification easy. Includes appendix of rare and vagrant species,

Overview


Learn all about Michigan's top 320 most notable bird species. Full-color illustrations complement detailed accounts, color-coded pages that cover habitat, nesting, feeding, vocal sounds, best sites for viewing, and tips for distinguishing from similar species. Illustrations and photographs make identification easy. Includes appendix of rare and vagrant species, index, bibliography, and glossary. Front of book gives color-coded keys to bird groups.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551053363
Publisher:
Lone Pine Publishing
Publication date:
06/02/2003
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
360
Sales rank:
183,568
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.68(d)
Age Range:
9 Years

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments4
Reference Guide5
Introduction17
Loons, Grebes, Pelicans, Cormorants33
Herons, Egrets, Vultures41
Geese, Swans, Ducks51
Ospreys, Hawks, Eagles, Falcons82
Pheasants, Grouse, Turkeys, Quails98
Rails, Coots, Cranes104
Plovers, Sandpipers, Phalaropes110
Jaegers, Gulls, Terns144
Doves, Cuckoos163
Owls167
Nighthawks, Swifts, Hummingbirds, Kingfishers177
Woodpeckers, Sapsuckers, Flickers182
Flycatchers, Wood-Pewees, Phoebes, Kingbirds191
Shrikes, Vireos202
Jays, Crows, Ravens210
Larks, Martins, Swallows214
Chickadees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Creepers, Wrens221
Kinglets, Bluebirds, Thrushes, Robins232
Mimics, Starlings, Pipits, Waxwings244
Wood-Warblers, Yellowthroats, Chats, Tanagers251
Sparrows, Juncos, Longspurs, Grosbeaks, Buntings290
Blackbirds, Meadowlarks, Grackles, Cowbirds, Orioles314
Finches, Crossbills, Redpolls, Grosbeaks, Eurasian Sparrows325
Appendix of Occasional Bird Species336
Select References344
Glossary345
Checklist347
Index351

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Birds of Michigan 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
brrdgrrl More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite birding book; it saves time for the learning birder as you don't have to sort through all the non-local birds and then be disappointed to ID a species that turns out to only exists on the Pacific coast, so it saves a lot of valuable ID time in the field before the cutie flits away!.  The pages are somewhat resistant to moisture although my book has not been directly rained on, I have used it in misty Michigan days.  There is a useful summary at the bottom of each page to help with useful ID clues and rule out similar species.  It's not as heavy as the Nat Geo book.  There is a very useful overview page in the beginning to help you narrow down and quickly ID species.  It has some unusual spp and vagrants but not an overwhelming number.  I have the book that jim c lists below too; I don't care for it although I love Stan T particularly his audio field guides, the bird field guides are color coded so confusing to use if you know anything about birds.  The only problem is that with global warming, some of the Michigan spp have changed.  I went birding in the UP last year, and the tour guide told me you can't really find boreal chickadees there anymore, but I remember seeing them in the early 90s.  :(  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Liked the organization and the graphics. Helpful book.
jim_carravallah More than 1 year ago
The combination of illustrations, cataloging methods, and descriptions makes accurate bird identification an easy task. Illustrations of the most characteristic silhouettes in flight, when perching, and on land or water allow the observer to easily find the broad catalog location. The catalog is well ordered for a non-biologist, while providing biological names for more detailed research if desired. Descriptions organized by identification, size, status for region, habitat, nesting and feeding habits, voice descriptions, and a comparison to similar species is excellent for isolating to an individual species no matter where the bird is encountered. The more dedicated watcher, who hopes to observe and record encounters with the most species possible, will appreciate the descriptions of likely sites to encounter a species as an aid to planning their Michigan trips.
BusyMomof2 More than 1 year ago
I bought this book when we put our bird feeder out on the deck so my kids and I could identify the birds at the feeder. It is very informative, easy to use and great details/pictures. We use it almost every day and the kids can now recognize many birds by sight. We love it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago