The Birth of the Republic, 1763-1789

The Birth of the Republic, 1763-1789

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by Edmund S. Morgan, Morgan
     
 

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In one remarkable quarter-century, thirteen quarrelsome colonies were transformed into a nation. Edmund S. Morgan's classic account of the Revolutionary period shows how the challenge of British taxation started the Americans on a search for constitutional principles to protect their freedom and eventually led to the Revolution.

Morgan demonstrates that these

Overview

In one remarkable quarter-century, thirteen quarrelsome colonies were transformed into a nation. Edmund S. Morgan's classic account of the Revolutionary period shows how the challenge of British taxation started the Americans on a search for constitutional principles to protect their freedom and eventually led to the Revolution.

Morgan demonstrates that these principles were not abstract doctrines of political theory but grew instead out of the immediate needs and experiences of the colonists. They were held with passionate conviction, and incorporated, finally, into the constitutions of the new American states and of the United States.

Though the basic theme of the book and his assessment of what the Revolution achieved remain the same, Morgan has updated the revised edition of The Birth of the Republic (1977) to include some textual and stylistic changes as well as a substantial revision of the Bibliographic Note. Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History emeritus at Yale University. His many books include The Gentle Puritan: A Life of Ezra Stiles; The Challenge of the American Revolution; and Inventing the People: The Rise of Popular Sovereignty in England and America.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226537566
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
02/01/1993
Series:
The Chicago History of American Civilization Series
Edition description:
3rd ed
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x (d)

Meet the Author


Edward S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and past president of the Organization of American Historians. His many books include The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-Century New England; The Gentle Puritan:  A Life of Ezra Stiles; The Puritan Dilemma: The Story of John Winthrop; American Slavery—American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia; The Challenge of the American Revolution; Inventing the People: The Rise of Popular Sovereignty in England and America; and, with Helen M. Morgan, The Stamp Act Crisis.

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The Birth of the Republic, 1763-1789 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I first began to read The Birth of the Republic I found it very hard to keep up with Morgan¿s writing style. It is not easy reading for the average person. Each sentence is vital in understanding his interpretation of the American Revolution. I found myself reading, re-reading, and stopping to think about what it was Morgan was saying for the first three or four chapters until I eventually became familiar with his style. He packs a great wealth of information in a relativley short amount of space. Morgan examines the events of the time and the principles and beliefs that sparked the American Revolution. After a while I found myself enjoying the book at times, but it was absolutely not written as a source of entertainment. I had to keep a dictionary close by whenever reading this book. It is a very factual piece with very little opinion. Edmund functions more like an analyst interpreting the facts. I would recommend this book to anyone who takes an interest in political science or would like to know more about the American Revolution. Morgan does one thing and he does it very well; he gives you an in-depth look into the events of the time and the principles and beliefs that helped shape a nation.