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Bite-Sized Marketing
     

Bite-Sized Marketing

4.0 1
by Nancy Dowd, Mary Evangeliste, Jonathan Silberman
 

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Christine Sanderson
The marketing of libraries is often overlooked. It is easy to assume that the local library will sell itself simply by its existence in the school or community; however, with so many options from which to choose for information, librarians must use marketing strategies to announce their programs and services. This title explores four basic areas of library marketing in a guide "with tangible ideas that can be done in bite-sized chunks." The four basic areas are word-of-mouth marketing (WOMM), guerilla marketing, digital marketing, and traditional print media. Word-of-mouth involves developing a message and finding influencers who can spread that message. Guerilla marketing focuses on storytelling and its value in personalizing the library. Digital marketing explains how to connect users with electronic resources and offers suggestions such as embedding help into resource pages and customizing links from databases. Print media offers advice on how to create press releases. The authors also include chapters on new marketing tools that can effectively and economically market the library. These include social networks, podcasts, videos, and Web 2.0 tools. There is also information on creating a brand, designing a Web site, and setting up displays at trade shows. The book is visually appealing, using checklists, insets, and bulleted lists. It touches on a wide variety of topics and can be used as questions arise or as a means of developing a marketing plan. It would be a good resource for most libraries. Reviewer: Christine Sanderson
Library Journal
"Marketing goes beyond trying to get people to use your library; it is a concerted effort to articulate your value." So begins this brief escapade into word-of-mouth-marketing (WOMM) and other techniques, including public service announcements (PSAs), press releases, podcasting, and the use of Web 2.0. The text includes highlighted boxes of information, but there are no appendixes, no examples of good PSAs or press releases, and no examples of how one evaluates a marketing plan or its measurement of success (or lack thereof). There are many resources available for those seeking how-to or marketing advice, including web sites and colleagues who have run successful marketing campaigns at their libraries. Either option would cost less. VERDICT As a "bite-sized" offering, this may fill a need as an appetizer but not as an entrée. If your budget has room, nibble. If not, pass.—B. Susan Brown, Pamunkey Regional Lib., Hanover, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780838910009
Publisher:
ALA Editions
Publication date:
11/01/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
154
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.40(d)

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Bite-Sized Marketing 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
C_A_Lajos More than 1 year ago
Writing upon the premise that worthwhile, ten-minute, marketing fixes for libraries are unattainable, but that library marketing does not have to be grand, here Dowd (Director of Marketing, New Jersey State Library, Trenton, NJ), Evangeliste (Director, User Services and Outreach, Musselman Library, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA), and Silberman (Owner, Fearless Future; Graphic Designer, American University Library, Washington, D.C.) show how library marketing can be integrated into the everyday work experiences of librarians and library staff and still be manageable. They have created a book presenting ideas and strategies to help librarians and others articulate the value of libraries. Based mainly upon word-of-mouth marketing but incorporating other marketing techniques, including storytelling, electronic resource marketing, public relations, outreach, advocacy, Web 2.0 tools, design, branding, best practices, and more, the authors present an assortment of simple and cost-effective marketing solutions for small to medium-sized libraries. Easy-to-read, insightful, and nicely-presented, with lists, examples, worksheets, and more, this publication, which functions as a quick informative resource rather than a detailed how-to manual or comprehensive reference book, will be of interest mostly to public librarians and others desiring to articulate the value of libraries and library services. Recommended. Review copy. C. A. Lajos, The Librarian's Review of Books