Bitter Java

Overview

Intended for intermediate Java programmers, analysts, and architects, this guide is a comprehensive analysis of common server-side Java programming traps (called anti-patterns) and their causes and resolutions. Based on a highly successful software conference presentation, this book is grounded on the premise that software programmers enjoy learning not from successful techniques and design patterns, but from bad programs, designs, and war stories — bitter examples. These educational techniques of graphically ...

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Overview

Intended for intermediate Java programmers, analysts, and architects, this guide is a comprehensive analysis of common server-side Java programming traps (called anti-patterns) and their causes and resolutions. Based on a highly successful software conference presentation, this book is grounded on the premise that software programmers enjoy learning not from successful techniques and design patterns, but from bad programs, designs, and war stories — bitter examples. These educational techniques of graphically illustrating good programming practices through negative designs and anti-patterns also have one added benefit: they are fun.

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Editorial Reviews

Wisconsin Bookwatch
A superbly presented guide...an essential, core addition to the Java user's reference shelf collection.
Today's Books
!!!! Exceptional.
JavaPro Magazine
...does a great job of articulating a philosophical foundation on which good architects and programmers can build....you'll wonder why more books couldn't be this good.
CVu the Journal of the ACCU
At last we have a book that tackles the problems rather than pretending there are none.
Compunotes.com
Save big bucks by reading this book instead of hiring a consultant.
SitePoint Tech Times
Will leave you with an instinctive sense for the antipatterns that you'll face in your future projects, so you can keep your Java brewing smooth and sweet.
VisualBuilder.com
Packed with useful design tips and techniques for the serious Java server-side developer. . . . you will want to read it many times.
From The Critics
Summarizing the lessons of common programming mistakes, this guide to Java describes the common difficulties, offers troubleshooting tips, and illustrates both with sample code. Focusing on server-side Java programming mistakes, it covers antipatterns for base Java and J2EE concepts like servlets, JSPs, EJBs, enterprise connection models, and scalability. An appendix feature cross-references of antipatterns. Tate is a programmer and Internet architect. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781930110434
  • Publisher: Manning Publications Company
  • Publication date: 4/1/2002
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 7.42 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Bruce Tate is an Internet architect who developed the bitter Java concept after seeing a set of customer problems repeated, collecting their stories, and publishing the solutions. He is the author of "Bitter Java," He lives in Austin, Texas. Mike Clark is president of Clarkware Consulting, Inc. He first encountered EJB pitfalls in 1998 while developing a custom EJB container, prior to the emergence of commercial J2EE servers. He has significantly contributed to the successful delivery of a popular J2EE performance management product and has also created several open source tools including JUnitPerf for automated performance testing. He lives in Parker, Colorado. Bob Lee is an OCI consultant with expertise in AOP, Jini, and web security. He developed an open source AOP framework that utilizes runtime bytecode engineering to intercept method invocations on POJOs and forms the foundation of JBoss AOP. He lives in St. Louis, Missouri. Patrick Linskey is the vice president of engineering for SolarMetric, a company that offers Java persistence alternatives to the Java community. His experience spans EJB application development and product development, and he is a teacher and speaker on the Java conference circuit. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2002

    Excellent Next Step For Intermediate Java Developers

    Bitter Java is a book with a mission. Bruce Tate set out to write this book in order to help Java developers entering into the world of J2EE development avoid the most common mistakes made. The book is centerd on the example of creating a BBS, and starts with servlets and continues through all of the possible tiers and pieces of the application. Each chapter has diagrams and code examples which help elucidate the material being presented. All that being said, some of the material is a bit repetitive, as it builds from chapter to chapter. Bruce Tate is sometimes a bit smug in his attitude towards other programming languages, and each chapter begins with a little homily that describes an extreme sport adventure Bruce has "lived" through. Some are fun to read, some could have been done without, but each is chosen to further illustrate the main points of the chapter. All in all, I give this book high marks for the material it presents, and the cogent way in which it was done. Bruce Tate is obviously a smart man, and a capable author, and he has filled a gaping hole in Java knowledge. If you are an intermediate Java developer moving into J2EE development, I highly suggest that you buy this book.

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