BizTalk: Implementing Business-to-Business E-Commerce

Overview

  • The complete business and technical guide to BizTalk implementation
  • How BizTalk builds on XML to deliver breakthrough B2B opportunities
  • Using BizTalk to integrate supply chains, enterprise applications, and internal business processes
  • Microsoft BizTalk Server: new products, services, and roadmaps
  • Foreword ...
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Overview

  • The complete business and technical guide to BizTalk implementation
  • How BizTalk builds on XML to deliver breakthrough B2B opportunities
  • Using BizTalk to integrate supply chains, enterprise applications, and internal business processes
  • Microsoft BizTalk Server: new products, services, and roadmaps
  • Foreword by John Gallant, Editorial Director, Network World magazine

Start leveraging BizTalk for competitive advantage—right now!

BizTalk, Microsoft's strategic e-commerce initiative, enables companies and industries to develop and evolve sophisticated e-marketplaces far more easily than ever before. In this authoritative, realistic book, leading e-business consultant James Kobielus walks you through every issue associated with BizTalk deployment-business and technical. You'll find specific, up-to-the-minute answers to the questions every decision-maker is asking about BizTalk:

  • How does BizTalk work, and how can it add value to B2B e-commerce?
  • How open is BizTalk-really?
  • How does BizTalk build on XML technologies, including schemas and namespaces?
  • How does BizTalk integrate with Windows 2000?
  • What will Microsoft's BizTalk-compliant offerings deliver-and when?
  • What are my best potential BizTalk applications?
  • How can I start planning for BizTalk right now?

Kobielus reviews each key BizTalk scenario in detail: hubbed marketplace integration, extranet supply-chain integration, and enterprise application integration. He introduces the latest commercial BizTalk-enabled products and services, and evaluates Microsoft'sstrategies for rolling out BizTalk offerings as server-based software and as portal-based services. Now's the time to understand BizTalk-and this is your business-focused, start-to-finish briefing.

"This is part textbook, part roadmap and part crystal ball-all mixed skillfully, thanks to Kobielus' eye for detail and his clear, direct prose"
—John Gallant, Editorial Director, Network World magazine
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A technical guide for businesses implementing Microsoft's e-commerce server software. It's intended for two groups: nontechnical management<-->business professionals who have a basic understanding of computer concepts and are responsible for business-to-business e- commerce projects<-->and technical management<-->IS and telecommunications experts who have a basic understanding of management issues and are responsible for e-commerce infrastructure planning, deployment, and operations. The guide provides a detailed technical discussion of BizTalk and how it integrates with other Microsoft technologies. It also covers how BizTalk fits into the architectures of hubbed e-marketplaces, extranets, and intranets, and examines how BizTalk figures into Microsoft's overall business plans. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

What Makes an Electronic Marketplace Tick?

We live in the most dynamic, productive, and innovative society the world has ever known.

Today's economy pulses with electronic vibrancy. We have created an engine of nonstop wealth generation, drawing power from the flow of cheap, easy, instantaneous transactions on the World Wide Web. In the few short years since we first commercialized the Web, this new mass medium has become a familiar presence in offices and households worldwide. Millions of us are venturing out onto the Web to browse for goods and services. The thought of transmitting our credit card numbers to a merchant's distant server no longer seems so scary. Buying online has become so commonplace that we hardly think twice anymore. E-commerce is simply how we shop and work in this new millennium.

Electronic marketplaces are the backbone of our new economy. We are all familiar with business-to-consumer (B2C) e-marketplaces, in the form of mass-market portals, online retailers, auction sites, and the like. Just as important are business-to-business (B2B) e-marketplaces, which build upon companies' long experience with electronic data interchange (EDI) and provide various Internet-based commerce services tailored to the needs of particular industries. Trading partners may establish B2B connections through online intermediaries, often called commerce "hubs" or "exchanges," or through secure "extranets" implemented between their respective internal networks. However implemented, these are environments where dozens, thousands, or millions of buyers and sellers can meet to transact business.

E-marketplaces rely, of course,on networks, software, and the technical wizardry that keeps it all operating around the clock, day in and day out, across all trading partners. But what makes B2B e-marketplaces really tick, down deep, are agreements on the ground rules for transactions among trading partners. This is where B2B trading environments build on traditional EDI, with its emphasis on secure, guaranteed, electronic delivery of standardized business documents. This is also where Microsoft's BizTalk initiative fits into the world of B2B e-commerce.

The beauty of BizTalk is in the simplicity of the concept and the richness of its potential B2B applications. At its core, BizTalk defines a standard electronic message "envelope" for routing e-commerce transactions between companies. You can transmit this BizTalk message over standard e-mail systems, over the Web, and over other underlying network "protocols." You can process this BizTalk message over any operating environment, using programs developed in any computer language, without the need for sending and receiving applications to be online at the same time or otherwise in direct communication.

BizTalk is several things. It is a Microsoft-championed strategic e-commerce initiative. It is a Microsoft-dominated e-commerce industry consortium, repository, and clearinghouse. It is a set of Microsoft-developed e-commerce interoperability specifications. It is a set of Microsoft and third-party products and services that implement these interoperability specifications. And it is a core infrastructure for the Microsoft .NET initiative.

Fundamentally, BizTalk supports development of ever more sophisticated "marketectures" for industry segments and the economy as a whole. You can build new e-commerce services by developing new business rules to manage the routing and processing of BizTalk messages and their precious cargo: structured business documents. Change the business rules for handling BizTalk messages and you change the ground rules of the e-marketplace. Change the business rules on your extranet and you reengineer the supply chain.

The details of Microsoft's multifaceted BizTalk initiative are the substance of this book. Microsoft has defined an ambitious roadmap for its own products and services that implement the BizTalk "framework." However, BizTalk is not just limited to Microsoft's offerings. Indeed, BizTalk will have failed as an industry initiative if Microsoft doesn't enlist a broad range of other software vendors and service providers to implement its technical framework.

BizTalk: Implementing Business-to-Business E-Commerce is a business book that will help you think through a host of management and technical issues before investing precious corporate resources on BizTalk-enabled products and services. We have developed this book primarily to serve two groups of professionals:

  • Nontechnical management: business professionals who have a basic understanding of computer and telecommunications concepts and are responsible for B2B e-commerce projects
  • Technical management: information systems and telecommunications professionals who have a basic understanding of management issues and are responsible for B2B e-commerce infrastructure planning, deployment, and operations within their organizations

We provide a detailed technical discussion of Microsoft's BizTalk Server 2000 product and how it integrates with Windows 2000, Commerce Server 2000, SQL Server 2000, Host Integration Server 2000, Visual Studio, and other Microsoft products, services, and technologies. We show you how BizTalk Server 2000 might figure into the architectures of hubbed e-marketplaces, extranets, and intranets. And we discuss how BizTalk figures into Microsoft's business plans and into those of some of Microsoft's strategic partners.

We have organized the book into four principal parts, each of which consists of several chapters.

Part One discusses BizTalk fundamentals. What is BizTalk? What value does BizTalk contribute to e-commerce? Who developed, manages, and oversees the BizTalk initiative's many facets? How does BizTalk differ from other e-commerce initiatives? Which vendors are implementing and supporting BizTalk? What are the basic standards and technologies behind BizTalk? How mature are BizTalk-compliant products and services? How open is the BizTalk Framework?

Part Two provides a comprehensive overview of BizTalk applications in B2B e-commerce. Most of the discussion addresses potential applications, since Microsoft had not yet released the commercial BizTalk Server 2000 product at the time this book was written. We describe three integration scenarios into which enterprises and service providers will deploy BizTalk Server 2000:

  • Hubbed marketplace integration: integrating your internal business processes indirectly, via external trading hubs and exchanges, with trading partners (TPs)
  • Extranet supply-chain integration: integrating your internal business processes directly, via extranets, with trading partners
  • Enterprise application integration: integrating your internal "back-end" business applications with your e-commerce site

Part Three discusses commercial BizTalk-enabled products and services that have been announced for availability in 2000. We examine on Microsoft's two-pronged strategy for rolling out BizTalk-enabled offerings: as server-based software products and as portal-based e-commerce services. We provide an in-depth discussion of Microsoft's BizTalk Server 2000 product and its integration with Windows 2000, Windows DNA 2000 application servers, and other Microsoft products and services.

Part Four discusses the various technologies, standards, and products that support a full deployment of BizTalk Server 2000 in a corporate or service provider network. In particular, we discuss the following BizTalk-related topics:

  • Operating environment: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Windows 2000?
  • Markup technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 parse, produce, and process messages and documents encoded in the industry-standard Extensible Markup Language (XML)?
  • Document mapping and transformation technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 use the industry-standard Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT) specification to map and transform XML-encoded messages and documents?
  • Schema definition technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 make use of the industry standard XML Namespaces and XML Schemas specifications, and Microsoft's own XML Data Reduced specification, in validating XML-encoded messages and documents?
  • Database technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft SQL Server?
  • Directory technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Windows 2000's Active Directory and with third-party directories via the industry standard Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).
  • Security technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Windows 2000's public key infrastructure (PKI) features?
  • Object technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM), Distributed COM (DCOM), and COM+ object technologies and work with the Microsoft-developed Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)?
  • Message-brokering technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Message Queue Server (MSMQ) and other message-brokering technologies, including IBM's MQSeries?
  • Transaction technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS).
  • Application development technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft's Visual Studio development tools?
  • System management technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Management Console?

We also provide a comprehensive glossary of technical terms that appear in the book. You will find this book an invaluable resource in high-visibility e-commerce integration projects over the coming years. BizTalk-compliant products and services will become widespread in B2B projects in the near future, riding on the coattails of the popular Windows 2000 operating environment.

The bottom line is that if your boss doesn't ask you to get up to speed on BizTalk, before long your trading partners almost certainly will.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface: What Makes an Electronic Marketplace Tick? xv
Foreword xix
About the Author xxi
Part 1 Biztalk Fundamentals 1
1 What Is BizTalk? 3
1.1 BizTalk, EDI, and Workflow 3
1.2 Microsoft as BizTalk Evangelist 6
1.3 BizTalk as Microsoft Strategic E-Commerce Initiative 6
1.3.1 BizTalk the Brand: Microsoft as Usual 7
1.3.2 BizTalk the Philosophy: A New Microsoft? 8
1.4 BizTalk as E-Commerce Interoperability Standards 12
1.4.1 BizTalk Application Model 13
1.4.2 BizTalk Schemas 19
1.4.3 BizTalk Documents 22
1.4.4 BizTalk Messages 27
1.4.5 BizTalk Workflows 28
1.4.6 BizTalk Event Model 29
1.5 BizTalk as E-Commerce Industry Coalition, Schema Repository, and Developer Community 29
1.5.1 BizTalk Steering Committee 30
1.5.2 Online Schema Repository 32
1.5.3 Developer Community 34
1.6 BizTalk as B2B E-Commerce Products and Services 35
2 How Does BizTalk Differ From Other E-Commerce Frameworks? 39
2.1 B2B Functional Reference Model 41
2.2 BizTalk and the B2B Reference Model 42
2.3 Ariba's Commerce XML (cXML) 44
2.4 Open Buying on the Internet 46
2.5 Open Trading Protocol 49
2.6 XML Electronic Data Interchange (XML/EDI) Group 49
2.7 Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards 52
2.8 Common Business Library 52
2.9 Vertical-Market E-Commerce Frameworks 53
2.9.1 Information and Content Exchange 54
2.9.2 RosettaNet 55
2.9.3 Open Applications Group Integration Specification 57
2.10 Synergies Between BizTalk and Other B2B Frameworks 59
3 What Are the Fundamental Technologies Behind BizTalk? 63
3.1 Electronic Data Interchange 64
3.1.1 Transaction Sets 67
3.1.2 Transmission, Storage, and Forwarding 69
3.1.3 Message Addressing 69
3.1.4 Mapping and Translation 70
3.1.5 Security 70
3.1.6 Directory 70
3.1.7 Archiving 70
3.1.8 Auditing 70
3.1.9 EDI and the B2B Reference Model 71
3.2 Workflow 72
3.2.1 Process Definition Tools 77
3.2.2 Workflow Enactment Services 82
3.2.3 Workflow Client Applications 84
3.2.4 Invoked Applications 86
3.2.5 Administration and Monitoring Tools 86
3.2.6 Workflow and the B2B Reference Model 87
3.3 Where EDI and Workflow Converge 88
4 Who's Supporting and Implementing BizTalk? 91
4.1 Who's on the BizTalk Steering Committee? 93
4.2 Who's Announced General Support for the BizTalk Initiative? 93
4.3 Who's Posting Schemas to BizTalk.org? 94
4.4 Who's Announced BizTalk-Compliant Solutions? 95
4.5 Which Users Are Candidates for Migration to BizTalk Server? 99
5 How Open Is the BizTalk Framework? 101
5.1 Microsoft's Familiar Approach to Implementing Open Standards 101
5.2 What Does "Open" Mean Anyway? 103
5.3 How Does the BizTalk Initiative Measure Against These Criteria of "Openness"? 104
5.3.1 Is It Described Fully in Publicly Available Documents? 105
5.3.2 Is It Flexible and Extensible? 105
5.3.3 Is It Independent of Any One Operating Environment, Network Protocol, Database, or Programming Language? 105
5.3.4 Is It Available as Open-Source Royalty-Free Distributions to All Interested Parties? 107
5.3.5 Is It Dominated or Unduly Influenced by One Vendor? 107
5.3.6 Is It Managed by an Industry Group that Does Not Impose Unreasonable or Unfair Restrictions on Membership? 107
5.3.7 Is It Managed by a Group that Does Not Conduct Business or Develop Specifications in Closed Working Environments? 107
5.3.8 Is It Managed by a Group that Publishes Full, Regular Updates on Their Activities? 107
5.4 Summary 107
Part 2 Biztalk Applications 109
6 Hubbed Marketplace Integration 111
6.1 Potential BizTalk Role in Hubbed E-Marketplaces 114
6.2 E-Marketecture Reference Model 116
6.3 Hosting Model 120
6.3.1 Broker-Hosted E-Marketplaces 124
6.3.2 Seller-Hosted E-Marketplaces 127
6.3.3 Buyer-Hosted E-Marketplaces 128
6.3.4 Industry-Hosted E-Marketplaces 132
6.4 Membership Model 134
6.4.1 Private Marketplaces 135
6.4.2 Vertical Marketplaces 137
6.4.3 Horizontal Marketplaces 138
6.5 Aggregation Model 139
6.5.1 Content-Aggregation Paradigms 139
6.5.2 Content-Disaggregation Paradigms 143
6.6 Transaction Model 147
6.6.1 Commercial Contracts 148
6.6.2 Bargaining Mechanisms 150
6.6.3 Transactional Workflows 154
6.7 Pricing Model 155
6.7.1 Forward Auctions 157
6.7.2 Reverse Auctions 161
6.7.3 Double Auctions 162
6.8 Payment Model 163
6.8.1 Internet-Based Account-Consolidation Services 164
6.8.2 Internet-Based Payment-Processing Services 165
6.8.3 Internet-Based Financial Institutions 169
6.8.4 Internet-Based Proxy Currencies 170
6.9 Facilitation Model 172
7 Extranet Supply-Chain Integration 177
7.1 Potential BizTalk Role in Extranet Supply Chain 179
7.2 Extranets and the E-Marketecture Reference Model 180
7.3 Extranet Hosting Model 182
7.4 Extranet Membership Model 185
7.4.1 Authentication 188
7.4.2 Authorization 190
7.4.3 Content Confidentiality 191
7.4.4 Content Integrity 192
7.4.5 Nonrepudiation 193
7.5 Extranet Aggregation Model 194
7.6 Extranet Transaction Model 195
7.6.1 Commercial Contracts 196
7.6.2 Bargaining Mechanisms 196
7.6.3 Transactional Workflows 196
7.7 Extranet Pricing Model 199
7.8 Extranet Payment Model 199
7.9 Extranet Facilitation Model 200
8 Enterprise Application Integration 201
8.1 Potential BizTalk Role in Enterprise Application Integration 202
8.2 EAI and the E-Marketecture Reference Model 204
8.3 Markup Languages 206
8.4 Development Interfaces 209
8.4.1 Partitioning 210
8.4.2 Jazzing 211
8.4.3 Componentizing 212
8.5 Object Technologies 214
8.5.1 CORBA 214
8.5.2 COM/DCOM 215
8.6 Connector Technologies 215
8.7 Transaction Technologies 217
8.7.1 Distibuted Transaction Processing Monitors 218
8.7.2 Message Brokers 218
Part 3 BizTalk Products and Services 221
9 Microsoft BizTalk Server 2000 223
9.1 BizTalk Server's Role in Microsoft's Application Server Family 224
9.2 Application Integration 229
9.2.1 Remote Application Interfaces 230
9.2.2 Schema Editing and Mapping 235
9.2.3 Business Process Policy Definition and Management 241
9.3 Content Processing 253
9.3.1 Content-Processing Components 253
9.3.2 Content-Processing Steps 255
9.3.3 Routing Options 257
9.4 Service Management 260
9.4.1 Single-Site Single-Server Deployment 261
9.4.2 Single-Site Multi-Server Deployment 266
9.4.3 Multi-Site Multi-Server Deployment 270
9.5 Summary 275
10 Microsoft Commerce Server 2000 277
10.1 Commerce Server 2000's Role in Microsoft's Application Server Family 277
10.2 User Management 283
10.3 Campaign Management 288
10.4 Catalog Management 292
10.5 Order Management 294
10.6 Operational Data Analysis 296
10.7 Summary 297
11 Other Microsoft Commerce-Related Products and Services 299
11.1 SQL Server 2000 300
11.2 Host Integration Server 2000 303
11.2.1 Network Integration Services 307
11.2.2 Security Integration Services 308
11.2.3 Data Integration Services 308
11.2.4 Transaction Integration Services 311
11.3 Application Center 2000 314
11.4 MSN E-Marketplace Services 316
11.5 Summary 317
Part 4 BizTalk Technologies 319
12 Microsoft E-Commerce Operating Environment 321
12.1 Windows Distributed interNetworking Architecture 322
12.1.1 Presentation Tier 323
12.1.2 Business Logic Tier 327
12.1.3 Data Tier 329
12.2 Windows 2000 331
12.3 Core Windows 2000 System Services 331
12.3.1 Windows 2000 File Services 334
12.3.2 Windows 2000 Directory Services 338
12.3.3 Windows 2000 Security Services 342
12.3.4 Windows 2000 Management Services 350
12.4 Summary 357
13 Microsoft E-Commerce Markup Technologies 359
13.1 What's XML? 360
13.1.1 Core Standard: XML 1.0 366
13.1.2 XML Supplementary Core Standards and Specifications 375
13.2 What is XML's Role in Microsoft's Products? 381
13.2.1 Windows 2000 382
13.2.2 Windows DNA 2000 Application Servers 382
13.2.3 Application Development Tools and Sites 385
13.2.4 Middleware Technologies 386
13.2.5 Client Applications 386
13.3 Summary 389
14 Microsoft E-Commerce Application Development and Middleware Technologies 391
14.1 Development Tools 392
14.2 Object Computing Framework 395
14.3 Object Brokering Framework 399
14.4 Message Brokering Framework 402
14.5 XML-Based Remote Procedure Calls 403
14.6 Data Access Components, Providers, and Drivers 410
14.7 Middleware, BizTalk-Hubbed E-Marketectures, and the Future of E-Commerce 412
Afterword: BizTalk and the Buzz of the Modern Economy 417
Glossary 419
Index 433
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Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

What Makes an Electronic Marketplace Tick?

We live in the most dynamic, productive, and innovative society the world has ever known.

Today's economy pulses with electronic vibrancy. We have created an engine of nonstop wealth generation, drawing power from the flow of cheap, easy, instantaneous transactions on the World Wide Web. In the few short years since we first commercialized the Web, this new mass medium has become a familiar presence in offices and households worldwide. Millions of us are venturing out onto the Web to browse for goods and services. The thought of transmitting our credit card numbers to a merchant's distant server no longer seems so scary. Buying online has become so commonplace that we hardly think twice anymore. E-commerce is simply how we shop and work in this new millennium.

Electronic marketplaces are the backbone of our new economy. We are all familiar with business-to-consumer (B2C) e-marketplaces, in the form of mass-market portals, online retailers, auction sites, and the like. Just as important are business-to-business (B2B) e-marketplaces, which build upon companies' long experience with electronic data interchange (EDI) and provide various Internet-based commerce services tailored to the needs of particular industries. Trading partners may establish B2B connections through online intermediaries, often called commerce "hubs" or "exchanges," or through secure "extranets" implemented between their respective internal networks. However implemented, these are environments where dozens, thousands, or millions of buyers and sellers can meet to transact business.

E-marketplaces rely, ofcourse,on networks, software, and the technical wizardry that keeps it all operating around the clock, day in and day out, across all trading partners. But what makes B2B e-marketplaces really tick, down deep, are agreements on the ground rules for transactions among trading partners. This is where B2B trading environments build on traditional EDI, with its emphasis on secure, guaranteed, electronic delivery of standardized business documents. This is also where Microsoft's BizTalk initiative fits into the world of B2B e-commerce.

The beauty of BizTalk is in the simplicity of the concept and the richness of its potential B2B applications. At its core, BizTalk defines a standard electronic message "envelope" for routing e-commerce transactions between companies. You can transmit this BizTalk message over standard e-mail systems, over the Web, and over other underlying network "protocols." You can process this BizTalk message over any operating environment, using programs developed in any computer language, without the need for sending and receiving applications to be online at the same time or otherwise in direct communication.

BizTalk is several things. It is a Microsoft-championed strategic e-commerce initiative. It is a Microsoft-dominated e-commerce industry consortium, repository, and clearinghouse. It is a set of Microsoft-developed e-commerce interoperability specifications. It is a set of Microsoft and third-party products and services that implement these interoperability specifications. And it is a core infrastructure for the Microsoft .NET initiative.

Fundamentally, BizTalk supports development of ever more sophisticated "marketectures" for industry segments and the economy as a whole. You can build new e-commerce services by developing new business rules to manage the routing and processing of BizTalk messages and their precious cargo: structured business documents. Change the business rules for handling BizTalk messages and you change the ground rules of the e-marketplace. Change the business rules on your extranet and you reengineer the supply chain.

The details of Microsoft's multifaceted BizTalk initiative are the substance of this book. Microsoft has defined an ambitious roadmap for its own products and services that implement the BizTalk "framework." However, BizTalk is not just limited to Microsoft's offerings. Indeed, BizTalk will have failed as an industry initiative if Microsoft doesn't enlist a broad range of other software vendors and service providers to implement its technical framework.

BizTalk: Implementing Business-to-Business E-Commerce is a business book that will help you think through a host of management and technical issues before investing precious corporate resources on BizTalk-enabled products and services. We have developed this book primarily to serve two groups of professionals:

  • Nontechnical management: business professionals who have a basic understanding of computer and telecommunications concepts and are responsible for B2B e-commerce projects
  • Technical management: information systems and telecommunications professionals who have a basic understanding of management issues and are responsible for B2B e-commerce infrastructure planning, deployment, and operations within their organizations

We provide a detailed technical discussion of Microsoft's BizTalk Server 2000 product and how it integrates with Windows 2000, Commerce Server 2000, SQL Server 2000, Host Integration Server 2000, Visual Studio, and other Microsoft products, services, and technologies. We show you how BizTalk Server 2000 might figure into the architectures of hubbed e-marketplaces, extranets, and intranets. And we discuss how BizTalk figures into Microsoft's business plans and into those of some of Microsoft's strategic partners.

We have organized the book into four principal parts, each of which consists of several chapters.

Part One discusses BizTalk fundamentals. What is BizTalk? What value does BizTalk contribute to e-commerce? Who developed, manages, and oversees the BizTalk initiative's many facets? How does BizTalk differ from other e-commerce initiatives? Which vendors are implementing and supporting BizTalk? What are the basic standards and technologies behind BizTalk? How mature are BizTalk-compliant products and services? How open is the BizTalk Framework?

Part Two provides a comprehensive overview of BizTalk applications in B2B e-commerce. Most of the discussion addresses potential applications, since Microsoft had not yet released the commercial BizTalk Server 2000 product at the time this book was written. We describe three integration scenarios into which enterprises and service providers will deploy BizTalk Server 2000:

  • Hubbed marketplace integration: integrating your internal business processes indirectly, via external trading hubs and exchanges, with trading partners (TPs)
  • Extranet supply-chain integration: integrating your internal business processes directly, via extranets, with trading partners
  • Enterprise application integration: integrating your internal "back-end" business applications with your e-commerce site

Part Three discusses commercial BizTalk-enabled products and services that have been announced for availability in 2000. We examine on Microsoft's two-pronged strategy for rolling out BizTalk-enabled offerings: as server-based software products and as portal-based e-commerce services. We provide an in-depth discussion of Microsoft's BizTalk Server 2000 product and its integration with Windows 2000, Windows DNA 2000 application servers, and other Microsoft products and services.

Part Four discusses the various technologies, standards, and products that support a full deployment of BizTalk Server 2000 in a corporate or service provider network. In particular, we discuss the following BizTalk-related topics:

  • Operating environment: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Windows 2000?
  • Markup technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 parse, produce, and process messages and documents encoded in the industry-standard Extensible Markup Language (XML)?
  • Document mapping and transformation technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 use the industry-standard Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT) specification to map and transform XML-encoded messages and documents?
  • Schema definition technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 make use of the industry standard XML Namespaces and XML Schemas specifications, and Microsoft's own XML Data Reduced specification, in validating XML-encoded messages and documents?
  • Database technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft SQL Server?
  • Directory technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Windows 2000's Active Directory and with third-party directories via the industry standard Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).
  • Security technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Windows 2000's public key infrastructure (PKI) features?
  • Object technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM), Distributed COM (DCOM), and COM+ object technologies and work with the Microsoft-developed Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)?
  • Message-brokering technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Message Queue Server (MSMQ) and other message-brokering technologies, including IBM's MQSeries?
  • Transaction technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS).
  • Application development technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft's Visual Studio development tools?
  • System management technologies: How does BizTalk Server 2000 integrate with Microsoft Management Console?

We also provide a comprehensive glossary of technical terms that appear in the book. You will find this book an invaluable resource in high-visibility e-commerce integration projects over the coming years. BizTalk-compliant products and services will become widespread in B2B projects in the near future, riding on the coattails of the popular Windows 2000 operating environment.

The bottom line is that if your boss doesn't ask you to get up to speed on BizTalk, before long your trading partners almost certainly will.

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2000

    Kobielus, the Author, Discusses BizTalk Book

    You'll have to pardon me for giving my own book a five-star rating. But I think it's worth it, and I'll tell you why. If you dig around, you'll find that I wrote another book four years ago, called 'Workflow Strategies' (for a different publisher). That prior book is now out of print, but I think I did a reasonably good job explaining workflow technology, discussing workflow products on the market then, and providing implementation guidelines. Since that book was published, though, I noticed a major trend in the workflow market. Workflow has gone from being a purely intra-organizational technology for document image processing to becoming a primarily inter-organizational technology for e-marketplaces, electronic data interchange, supply chain integration, and customer relationship management. Initiatives such as Microsoft's BizTalk are driving workflow into the B2B space. Microsoft made workflow (or, in its word, 'orchestration') technology central to the BizTalk initiative. In many ways, Microsoft has thought through the workflow implications of B2B more thoroughly than other vendors in this space. BizTalk is certainly not the only workflow-oriented B2B interoperability specification initiative or product offering. But, having Microsoft's backing, the BizTalk initiative has the best chance of achieving de facto standards status. We're moving into a new era in Internet-centric markets hubbed by master workflow engines such as BizTalk Server 2000. My book provides you with a compendium for understanding the BizTalk initiative globally, the BizTalk Framework, BizTalk Server 2000, and related Microsoft products, services, and technologies. Also, it provides a handy reference book for understanding the role of BizTalk products and technologies in the architecture of e-marketplaces, extranets, and enterprise applications. That's a lot of value for your money. Whether you're an application developer, network planner, or business executive, you'll find something very useful in this book. And that's why I wrote it. Regards, Jim

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