Black April: The Fall of South Vietnam, 1973-75

( 2 )

Overview


The defeat of South Vietnam was arguably America’s worst foreign policy disaster of the 20th Century. Yet a complete understanding of the endgame—from the 27 January 1973 signing of the Paris Peace Accords to South Vietnam’s surrender on 30 April 1975—has eluded us.

Black April addresses that deficit. A culmination of exhaustive research in three distinct areas: primary source documents from American archives, North Vietnamese publications containing primary and secondary ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$19.22
BN.com price
(Save 35%)$29.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (13) from $6.59   
  • New (8) from $17.05   
  • Used (5) from $6.50   

Overview


The defeat of South Vietnam was arguably America’s worst foreign policy disaster of the 20th Century. Yet a complete understanding of the endgame—from the 27 January 1973 signing of the Paris Peace Accords to South Vietnam’s surrender on 30 April 1975—has eluded us.

Black April addresses that deficit. A culmination of exhaustive research in three distinct areas: primary source documents from American archives, North Vietnamese publications containing primary and secondary source material, and dozens of articles and numerous interviews with key South Vietnamese participants, this book represents one of the largest Vietnamese translation projects ever accomplished, including almost one hundred rarely or never seen before North Vietnamese unit histories, battle studies, and memoirs. Most important, to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of South Vietnam’s conquest, the leaders in Hanoi released several compendiums of formerly highly classified cables and memorandum between the Politburo and its military commanders in the south. This treasure trove of primary source materials provides the most complete insight into North Vietnamese decision-making ever complied. While South Vietnamese deliberations remain less clear, enough material exists to provide a decent overview.

Ultimately, whatever errors occurred on the American and South Vietnamese side, the simple fact remains that the country was conquered by a North Vietnamese military invasion despite written pledges by Hanoi’s leadership against such action. Hanoi’s momentous choice to destroy the Paris Peace Accords and militarily end the war sent a generation of South Vietnamese into exile, and exacerbated a societal trauma in America over our long Vietnam involvement that reverberates to this day. How that transpired deserves deeper scrutiny.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In the first of a projected two volumes, Veith (Code-Name Bright Light: The Untold Story of U.S. POW Rescue Efforts During the Vietnam War) provides “a comprehensive analysis of the finale of America’s first lost war.” That analysis mainly consists of a thorough recounting of the military action that took place after the United States withdrew its last combat troops in March 1973. He combed through official American sources as well as North Vietnamese material, including unit histories, battle studies, and memoirs that he translated into English for the first time. He also mined primary source material from South Vietnam, and conducted dozens of interviews. The result is a detailed account, heavy on descriptions of battlefield tactics of both sides. As for his political analysis, Veith contends—contrary to the prevailing wisdom—that the South Vietnamese in general fought well, and that the U.S. was primarily responsible for their defeat: due to “congressional restraints on aid” to South Vietnam, American “anti-war crusaders,” and “major media institutions,” as well as North Vietnamese perfidy and South Vietnamese Premier Nguyen Van Thieu’s “military blunders.” This will appeal to readers who want military details of the conclusion of the Vietnam War, as well as those who share Veith’s anticommunism. (Mar.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594035722
  • Publisher: Encounter Books
  • Publication date: 5/8/2012
  • Pages: 624
  • Sales rank: 1,519,307
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 1.73 (d)

Meet the Author


George J. Veith, a former Army captain, has written extensively on the Vietnam War and POWs/MIAs. He is most recently the author of Leave No Man Behind: Bill Bell and the Search for American POW/MIAs from the Vietnam War (2004). He has presented papers at major conferences, including the May 2008 conference in Paris on “War, Diplomacy, and Public Opinion: The Paris Peace Talks on Vietnam and the End of the Vietnam War (1968-1975).” He testified twice on the POW/MIA issue before the Congress.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Maps ix

Acknowledgments xi

List of Abbreviations xv

List of Persons xvii

Military Forces xxi

Introduction 1

Chapter 1 "The U.S. will react vigorously": Signing the Paris Peace Accords 17

Chapter 2 "South Vietnam will have both peace and war": The Collapse of the Accords 35

Chapter 3 "Enough to make the angels weep": Trading Blood for Ammunition 53

Chapter 4 "A rainy season like no other": The War Resumes 71

Chapter 5 "Even the gods weep for Phuoc Long": The Beginning of the End 91

Chapter 6 "How can the free world abandon us?": Preparing for the Strategic Blow 115

Chapter 7 "Goodbye for now, Ban Me Thuot": Beginning the "Great Spring Offensive" 141

Chapter 8 "Light at the top, heavy at the bottom": Decisions That Destroyed a Nation 171

Chapter 9 "The Road of Blood and Tears": The Retreat from the Highlands 203

Chapter 10 "Chaos and disintegration": Surrounding Saigon 235

Chapter 11 "How could I abandon this rocky soil?": Fighting to Save Hue 263

Chapter 12 "The hours of hell": The Collapse of I Corps 299

Chapter 13 "The sea is our only hope": The Battle for the Coastal Cities 331

Chapter 14 "Lightning speed, daring, surprise, certain victory": PAVN Surrounds Saigon 357

Chapter 15 "Hold fast the remaining land": The South Vietnamese Fight Back 383

Chapter 16 "No matter what happens, do not stop your attack": Capturing Phan Rang 415

Chapter 17 "I will knock them down!": ARVN Holds at Xuan Loc 435

Chapter 18 "Do not come home until victory is won": The Fall of Saigon 463

Notes 501

Selected Bibliography 541

Index 557

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 30, 2012

    Great details and new information

    The author gives a great overview of the last two years of the Vietnam war. The first several chapters go over the time peroid from the signing of the paris peace accords and the opening of the Norths final offensive. Most of the book describes the final North Vietnamese offensive. The author discribes the mistakes that the South Vietnamese leadership made and more importantly, the bravery of the South Vietnamese military. The author also describes events that prevented the United States from supporting its ally.
    The author uses many new primary sources (mostly North Vietnamese)to shed new light on the last years of the Vietnam War.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)