The Black Arrow: A Tale of Two Roses

( 85 )

Overview

"The Black Arrow" is what every book about the Middle Ages should be and more, with suspense, action, disguises, escapes, and of course, the occasional love scene. Robert Louis Stevenson lived in the mid-1800s, and is renowned for his many works, including Treasure Island, Dr.Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Kidnapped. The Black Arrow, written originally for a magazine, was written after Stevenson's recovery from a serious illness and published right after Treasure Island. Dick Shelton, a boy of sixteen, is quickly thrust into the conflict of the War of
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Black Arrow

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Overview

"The Black Arrow" is what every book about the Middle Ages should be and more, with suspense, action, disguises, escapes, and of course, the occasional love scene. Robert Louis Stevenson lived in the mid-1800s, and is renowned for his many works, including Treasure Island, Dr.Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Kidnapped. The Black Arrow, written originally for a magazine, was written after Stevenson's recovery from a serious illness and published right after Treasure Island. Dick Shelton, a boy of sixteen, is quickly thrust into the conflict of the War of the Roses. He battles against almost any kind of evil - bloodthirsty pirates, a murderous priest, and even his own legal guardian - Sir Daniel Brackley. Through the whole book Dick strives to become a knight and rescue his true love. Although most likely the least known of Stevenson's great adventure novels, "The Black Arrow" is the best in the eyes of many.

In fifteenth-century England, when his father's murderer is revealed to be his guardian, seventeen-year-old Richard Shelton joins the fellowship of the Black Arrow in avenging the death, rescuing the woman he loves, and participating in the struggle between the Yorks and Lancasters in the War of the Roses.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781494838522
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 12/30/2013
  • Pages: 166
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Louis  Stevenson
Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson (1850-1894) was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer. His best-known books include Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. A literary celebrity during his lifetime, Stevenson now ranks among the 26 most translated authors in the world. He has been greatly admired by many authors, including Jorge Luis Borges, Ernest Hemingway, Rudyard Kipling, Marcel Schwob, Vladimir Nabokov, J. M. Barrie, and G. K. Chesterton, who said of him that he "seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen, like a man playing spillikins." Stevenson was a celebrity in his own time, but with the rise of modern literature after World War I, he was seen for much of the 20th century as a writer of the second class, relegated to children's literature and horror genres. Condemned by literary figures such as Virginia Woolf (daughter of his early mentor Leslie Stephen) and her husband Leonard, he was gradually excluded from the canon of literature taught in schools. His exclusion reached a height when in the 1973 2,000-page Oxford Anthology of English Literature Stevenson was entirely unmentioned; and The Norton Anthology of English Literature excluded him from 1968 to 2000 (1st-7th editions), including him only in the 8th edition (2006). The late 20th century saw the start of a re-evaluation of Stevenson as an artist of great range and insight, a literary theorist, an essayist and social critic, a witness to the colonial history of the Pacific Islands, and a humanist. Even as early as 1965 the pendulum had begun to swing: he was praised by Roger Lancelyn Green, one of the Oxford Inklings, as a writer of a consistently high level of "literary skill or sheer imaginative power" and a co-originator with H. Rider Haggard of the Age of the Story Tellers. He is now being re-evaluated as a peer of authors such as Joseph Conrad (whom Stevenson influenced with his South Seas fiction), and Henry James, with new scholarly studies and organizations devoted to Stevenson. No matter what the scholarly reception, Stevenson remains popular worldwide.

Biography

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh. His father was an engineer, the head of a family firm that had constructed most of Scotland's lighthouses, and the family had a comfortable income. Stevenson was an only child and was often ill; as a result, he was much coddled by both his parents and his long-time nurse. The family took frequent trips to southern Europe to escape the cruel Edinburgh winters, trips that, along with his many illnesses, caused Stevenson to miss much of his formal schooling. He entered Edinburgh University in 1867, intending to become an engineer and enter the family business, but he was a desultory, disengaged student and never took a degree. In 1871, Stevenson switched his study to law, a profession which would leave time for his already-budding literary ambitions, and he managed to pass the bar in 1875.

Illness put an end to his legal career before it had even started, and Stevenson spent the next few years traveling in Europe and writing travel essays and literary criticism. In 1876, Stevenson fell in love with Fanny Vandergrift Osbourne, a married American woman more than ten years his senior, and returned with her to London, where he published his first fiction, "The Suicide Club." In 1879, Stevenson set sail for America, apparently in response to a telegram from Fanny, who had returned to California in an attempt to reconcile with her husband. Fanny obtained a divorce and the couple married in 1880, eventually returning to Europe, where they lived for the next several years. Stevenson was by this time beset by terrifying lung hemorrhages that would appear without warning and required months of convalescence in a healthy climate. Despite his periodic illnesses and his peripatetic life, Stevenson completed some of his most enduring works during this period: Treasure Island (1883), A Child's Garden of Verses (1885), Kidnapped (1886), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).

After his father's death and a trip to Edinburgh which he knew would be his last, Stevenson set sail once more for America in 1887 with his wife, mother, and stepson. In 1888, after spending a frigid winter in the Adirondack Mountains, Stevenson chartered a yacht and set sail from California bound for the South Pacific. The Stevensons spent time in Tahiti, Hawaii, Micronesia, and Australia, before settling in Samoa, where Stevenson bought a plantation called Vailima. Though he kept up a vigorous publishing schedule, Stevenson never returned to Europe. He died of a sudden brain hemorrhage on December 3, 1894.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Good To Know

It has been said that Stevenson may well be the inventor of the sleeping bag -- he described a large fleece-lined sack he brought along to sleep in on a journey through France in his book Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes.

Long John Silver, the one-legged pirate cook in Stevenson's classic Treasure Island, is said to be based on the author's friend William Ernest Henley, whom he met when Henley was in Edinburgh for surgery to save his one good leg from tuberculosis.

Stevenson died in 1894 at Vailima,, his home on the South Pacific island of Upolu, Samoa. He was helping his wife make mayonnaise for dinner when he suffered a fatal stroke.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 13, 1850
    2. Place of Birth:
      Edinburgh, Scotland
    1. Date of Death:
      December 3, 1894
    2. Place of Death:
      Vailima, Samoa

Table of Contents

Prologue 3
Book I The Two Lads
At the Sign of the Sun in Kettley 19
In the Fen 27
The Fen Ferry 33
A Greenwood Company 40
"Bloody as the Hunter" 47
To the Day's End 55
The Hooded Face 61
Book II The Moat House
Dick Asks Questions 70
The Two Oaths 78
The Room over the Chapel 85
The Passage 91
How Dick Changed Sides 96
Book III My Lord Foxham
The House by the Shore 105
A Skirmish in the Dark 112
Saint Bride's Cross 118
The Good Hope 121
The Good Hope (continued) 129
The Good Hope (concluded) 135
Book IV The Disguise
The Den 141
"In Mine Enemies' House" 148
The Dead Spy 156
In the Abbey Church 163
Earl Risingham 172
Arblaster Again 176
Book V Crookback
The Shrill Trumpet 186
The Battle of Shoreby 193
The Battle of Shoreby (concluded) 199
The Sack of Shoreby 203
Night in the Woods--Alicia Risingham 212
Night in the Woods (concluded)--Dick and Joan 219
Dick's Revenge 228
Conclusion 232
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 85 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(30)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(15)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(24)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 86 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Couldn't put it down

    A great read! A wonderful adventure story. Fans of "Treasure Island" will certainly love this book. Also, I read this on my nook and contrary to what other reviewers had to say, I had no problem with the format. Reviewers, please do not comment solely on the format without thinking of the quality of the story. Many readers rely on reviews and would miss out on a great story because of reviews from people who did not end up reading the book. If there is a problem with the format take it up with your provider, don't give a good book and bad name!

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2001

    A Stevenson Treasure

    Before I read The Black Arrow, the only Stevenson stories that I had read were Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jeykll and Mr. Hyde. When I read this story, I found a Stevenson story that pulled me into a world that was quite different from the worlds of Stevenson that I had entered before. The Black Arrow is an interesting story that combines several themes in a twisting but not confusing plot. I also enjoyed the rich desciption of the settings and battles. However, some of the language is often hard to follow since many of the words Stevenson used are unused in today's speech. But the engrossing plot kept me engaged as long as I took the time to read slightly slower and not skip over such words as 'churlish.' But overall, this was a great book and I would recommend it to anyone who has read any of Stevenson's stories.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    POOR SCAN

    Choose this book version with the cover picture instead. This version is unreadable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 24, 2011

    Don't bother.

    Don't bother downloading this book as it is unreadable. Besides the misscans, my Nook kept getting stuck. It won't go past some pages even if you shut off your Nook and restart it. The parts I did get to read were fairly interesting.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 26, 2011

    Very bad typography

    A great book but almost unreadable: missing words and letters, strange symbols, reversed pages, etc. Buy the optimized version with terrific Wyeth illustrations.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2011

    poor

    i am sure the book must be good, but I found it unreadable due to poor scanning.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 4, 2009

    Poor ebook formatting

    I don't actually know whether the book is good or not. The ebook is formatted very poorly for online reading - no paragraph breaks, no chapter headings, justified text, and illustration captions mixed into the story. I found it impossible to read. I usually enjoy old historical fiction - but not this book in this format.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 15, 2009

    Unreadable version, look elsewhere

    This edition was scanned by Google, and the OCR turned into an ebook. Unfortunately, Google doesn't need to concern itself with little subtleties like paragraphs for its search engine. Unless you want to read Robert Louis Stevenson channeled by James Joyce, you're much better off viewing the Google Books PDF edition, or any edition from Project Gutenberg (http://www.pgdp.net) or other public domain ebook sites (http://www.mobileread.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=132, http://www.munseys.com/, etc.) I'm not sure if anyone else has a free eReader format book, though.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2003

    The Black Arrow is a great book, I recomend it to all

    The Black Arrow is my favorite book of all time, it's a little hard to get into from the begining but you quickly catch-on. I find it amazing that the main character time after time ends up in a trap and yet somehow allways gets out with his life!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2014

    nyancat(the fires rper)

    Ok?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2014

    Reece

    K

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2014

    Don't worry, I wont tell.....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2014

    The Black Arrow


    (

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    Isabel

    Ok. Im wating for you

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 30, 2013

    Recommended to those who like reading Shakespeare

    While I appreciate the story being told, understanding the language of 15th century England poses a challenge. I'm drawn back to my studies of Shakespeare. Wouldst that this missive been more easily readable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    Freshkit

    Wished that there was a medicine cat to train him to be a med cat

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    Less than zero stars...

    Total jibberish due to a million typos!!!
    Unreadable jumbled mess of characters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    Harley...i need help

    This book loks good but does it have innapropiate scens? Like sex ans kissing

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Neverrr

    Neevvverr

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 15, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Whiling away my time in the library of The American School in Lo

    Whiling away my time in the library of The American School in London, I found this book purely by chance. I was in the seventh grade at the time.

    The Black Arrow is set in England in the days of Henry VI. It opens with the knight Sir Daniel leaving a trail of rack and ruin across the countryside surrounding his Moat House. The villainous archer Appleyard (veteran of Agincourt), man-at-arms Bennett Hatch and Sir Oliver Oates assist Sir Daniel. The outlaw Jon Amend-All vows revenge against all four of them, taunting them in this note nailed to the door of the church:

    "Dick Shelton took the page in his hand and read it aloud. It contained some lines of very rugged doggerel, hardly even rhyming, written in a gross character, and most uncouthly spelt. With the spelling somewhat bettered, this is how they ran:

    I had four blak arrows under my belt,
    Four for the greefs that I have felt,
    Four for the number of ill menne
    That have oppressed me now and then


    One is gone; one is wele sped;
    Old Appleyaird is dead.
    One is for Master Bennet Hatch,
    That burned Grimstone, walls and thatch.


    One is for Sir Oliver Oates,
    Who cut Sir Harry Shelton's throat.
    Sir Daniel, ye shall have the fourth;
    We shall think it fair sport.


    Ye shall each have your own part,
    A blak arrow in each blak heart.
    Get ye to your knees for to pray,
    Ye are dead theeves by yea and nay.
    From Jon Amend-All of the Green Wood and his jolly fellowship

    "Now, well-a-day for charity and the Christian graces!" cried Sir Oliver, lamentably. "Sirs, this is an ill world, and daily groweth worse."

    The book was filmed in 1911 and 1948. It was also an Australian TV special in 1973.

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