Black Beauty: The Graphic Novel (Puffin Graphic Classic Series)

Black Beauty: The Graphic Novel (Puffin Graphic Classic Series)

by Anna Sewell
     
 

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The Graphic Novelization of a Classic Tale!

A handsome and sweet-tempered horse, Black Beauty is strong and spirited. His mother warns him that there are bad, cruel men in the world, but Black Beauty sees none of it in his fine, happy home. Until the day when he is sold, when his life changes immeasurably and he finally sees the truth in his mother's words.

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Overview

The Graphic Novelization of a Classic Tale!

A handsome and sweet-tempered horse, Black Beauty is strong and spirited. His mother warns him that there are bad, cruel men in the world, but Black Beauty sees none of it in his fine, happy home. Until the day when he is sold, when his life changes immeasurably and he finally sees the truth in his mother's words. As he moves from master to master, Beauty's adventures will captivate readers, and June Brigman's wonderful illustrations will capture their imaginations.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Jumping on the graphic novel bandwagon, this series launches a line of graphic novels based on classics. The text of each of these first three offerings is true to the original work but abridged. Although the format can make literature more accessible, it can also, in some cases, lend an air of hipness to a work as well. Black Beauty is a children's classic, but the gorgeous, fluid, black-and-white drawings in this version make the story more appealing to an older crowd. Frankenstein lends itself best to the format. The stylized drawings covered with washes of grey add to the atmosphere of fright and horror about what the good doctor has wrought. Red Badge of Courage is the least appealing adaptation. Although Crane's writing is elegant, it can be daunting to a middle schooler unused to nineteenth-century turns of phrase. A graphic novel could have been just the thing to make this work more accessible; instead it somehow makes Crane's story more muddled. In fact his writing was apparently too uncomplicated for the editor of this GN because in a section telling how the work was adapted, readers are shown a variation of a battle sequence that is compact and true to Crane's writing. The editorial notes tell the artist to expand it by several pages. Overall these books are fun adaptations of great literature. The black-and-white art in all three is terrific, and keeping the original text ensures high quality stories. At the end of each book, there are sections titled "The Making of . . ." where the artist explains how she or he planned the breakdown of the story and how the art layout was determined. There are also galleries of alternate covers as well as early sketchesof the main characters. It is a nice look inside the process of adaptation and the creation of a graphic novel. The books would be a good choice for the library or media center both to grow a graphic novel collection and to bolster the literature collection. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M J G (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Graphic Novel Format). 2005, Puffin, 176p., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 15.
—Geri Diorio
KLIATT
Black Beauty is rightly considered a classic; Sewell's story of a horse's life, told from the horse's point of view, is a moving statement against animal cruelty. It's also a great story. After an idyllic childhood, Black Beauty is sold into slavery. He serves under a number of masters—some kind, some cruel, some indifferent—before being put out to pasture. Despite its happy ending, Black Beauty does not sugarcoat the fact that a horse's life is one of misery and drudgery. Whether it's cruel or kind, slavery is still slavery. This adaptation does justice to Sewell's novel. Brigman and Richardson are a husband-and-wife team, and their b/w artwork is quite expressive. Black Beauty looks suitably regal, a prince amongst horses, and he displays a wide variety of emotions. I'm sure it's not simple to draw a dejected horse, but the authors make it look easy. Black Beauty contains depictions of animal cruelty. Highly recommended for libraries with graphic novel collections. KLIATT Codes: JSA*—Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2005, Penguin, Puffin Graphics, 176p. illus., Ages 12 to adult.
—George Galuschak

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606337571
Publisher:
San Val, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/01/2005
Series:
Puffin Graphic Classic Series
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.22(w) x 7.92(h) x 0.84(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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