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Black Beauty: The Autobiography of a Horse (THE GREAT CLASSICS LIBRARY)
     

Black Beauty: The Autobiography of a Horse (THE GREAT CLASSICS LIBRARY)

4.1 9
by Anna Sewell
 

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This children's classic was not written for children butt "to induce kindness, sympathy, and an understanding treatment of horses"—an influence the author attributed to an essay on animals she had read earlier by Horace Bushnell (1802–1876) entitled "Essay on Animals". Her sympathetic portrayal of the plight of working animals led to a vast outpouring of

Overview

This children's classic was not written for children butt "to induce kindness, sympathy, and an understanding treatment of horses"—an influence the author attributed to an essay on animals she had read earlier by Horace Bushnell (1802–1876) entitled "Essay on Animals". Her sympathetic portrayal of the plight of working animals led to a vast outpouring of concern for animal welfare and is said to have been instrumental in abolishing the cruel practice of using the checkrein (or "bearing rein", a strap used to keep horses' heads high, fashionable in Victorian England but painful and damaging to a horse's neck). Black Beauty also contains two pages about the use of blinkers on horses, concluding that this use is likely to cause accidents at night due to interference with "the full use of" a horse's ability to "see much better in the dark than men can."
The story is narrated in the first person as an autobiographical memoir told by the titular horse named Black Beauty—beginning with his carefree days as a colt on an English farm with his mother, to his difficult life pulling cabs in London, to his happy retirement in the country. Along the way, he meets with many hardships and recounts many tales of cruelty and kindness. Each short chapter recounts an incident in Black Beauty's life containing a lesson or moral typically related to the kindness, sympathy, and understanding treatment of horses, with Sewell's detailed observations and extensive descriptions of horse behaviour lending the novel a good deal of verisimilitude.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940016119878
Publisher:
Revenant
Publication date:
12/20/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
410 KB

Meet the Author

Anna Sewell (1820 – 1878)[1] was an English novelist, best known as the author of the classic novel Black Beauty. She was born in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England into a devoutly Quaker family. Her father was Isaac Phillip Sewell (1793–1879), and her mother, Mary Wright Sewell (1798–1884) was a successful author of children's books. At fourteen, she slipped while walking home from school and severely injured both of her ankles. Most likely because of mistreatment of her injury, for the rest of her life Anna was unable to stand without a crutch or to walk for any length of time. For greater mobility, she frequently used horse-drawn carriages, which contributed to her love of horses and concern for the humane treatment of animals.

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Black Beauty: The Autobiography of a Horse 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book! I've read it about three times; its bittersweet, but its really good!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
49 chapters?I read only 27 chapters from my school's library's copy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I lovve black beauty! I have two copies of the movie :)
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