Black Blossoms

Overview

Black Blossoms offers a sustained exploration into the private lives of working class women of color and their difficult journeys. In surreal fairytales and magical biographies, Black Blossoms travels the U.S. and abroad: a daughter in Baja California tends to her sick father and watches for “the prince in his storybook tights”; “The Unsung Story of the Invisible Woman” in Phoenix, Arizona; the infamous New England spinster Lizzie Borden. A follow-up to Gonzalez’s Other Fugitives and Other Strangers (which ...
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Overview

Black Blossoms offers a sustained exploration into the private lives of working class women of color and their difficult journeys. In surreal fairytales and magical biographies, Black Blossoms travels the U.S. and abroad: a daughter in Baja California tends to her sick father and watches for “the prince in his storybook tights”; “The Unsung Story of the Invisible Woman” in Phoenix, Arizona; the infamous New England spinster Lizzie Borden. A follow-up to Gonzalez’s Other Fugitives and Other Strangers (which recounted male lives), Black Blossoms interweaves sex, death and violence: the tragedies of loving and losing.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The poems in Gonzalez’s third collection are rooted in the female body. Death and decay also thread through the collection, manifesting in lush and sensuous imagery. In the title poem, Gonzalez addresses barren women in dark, graphic language that borders on the grotesque: “when the sun sets next it will// blossom with the blackest mushrooms and the moths/ will lay their eggs on your leathery smiles.” Gonzalez’s poems depict the body as a space that carries burden and loss, the site of a fleeting life: “this is the part where the woman enters./ This is the part where she leaves. Her life/ so quick it could have been missed had she left no evidence of the blackbird to construct/ its nest.” Each of us is insignificant and replaceable, Gonzalez seems to say: “borrowed body, in the time you must vacate,// let another take your space./ Don’t worry about whom or when since the girl/ who comes after is already here.” The last section (of four) is told through the voices of the female characters surrounding a mortician. Lust and marriage, birth and death, weave together in their observations and confessions. The mortician’s wife observes, “sound is death because it’s/ irretrievable and every time I speak I die a little more.” (Oct.)
From the Publisher
STARRED REVIEW- “The poems in Gonzalez’s third collection are rooted in the female body. Death and decay also thread through the collection, manifesting in lush and sensuous imagery. In the title poem, Gonzalez addresses barren women in dark, graphic language that borders on the grotesque: “when the sun sets next it will// blossom with the blackest mushrooms and the moths/ will lay their eggs on your leathery smiles.” Gonzalez’s poems depict the body as a space that carries burden and loss, the site of a fleeting life: “this is the part where the woman enters./ This is the part where she leaves. Her life/ so quick it could have been missed had she left no evidence of the blackbird to construct/ its nest.” Each of us is insignificant and replaceable, Gonzalez seems to say: “borrowed body, in the time you must vacate,// let another take your space./ Don’t worry about whom or when since the girl/ who comes after is already here.” The last section (of four) is told through the voices of the female characters surrounding a mortician. Lust and marriage, birth and death, weave together in their observations and confessions. The mortician’s wife observes, “sound is death because it’s/ irretrievable and every time I speak I die a little more.””—Publisher’s Weekly

This third book of poetry by González, an award-winning Chicano writer equally at home in fiction (Crossing Vines) and children’s literature, complements the male subjects of his Other Fugitives and Other Strangers by focusing on female bodies. The first part, “Mundo de Mujeres” (World of Women) poeticizes women on the fringe of society. Some lines conjure up graphic, arresting visions: “The heavy snow disrobes the landscape of its mountains.” ... [This collection] will appeal to fans of contemporary poetry—Library Journal

Library Journal
This third book of poetry by González, an award-winning Chicano writer equally at home in fiction (Crossing Vines) and children's literature, complements the male subjects of his Other Fugitives and Other Strangers by focusing on female bodies. The first part, "Mundo de Mujeres" (World of Women) poeticizes women on the fringe of society. Some lines conjure up graphic, arresting visions: "The heavy snow disrobes the landscape of its mountains." Or, from "Widows": "Don't you dare remove your black dress:/ the sound of a garment mourning the loss/ of your body's comfort will break our hearts." The second section, "Floreo," ostensibly develops the motif of flowers, more akin to those of Baudelaire than of Wordsworth. The six poems of the last section, "The Mortician Poems," emphasize the theme of death and violence hinted at in the beginning of the collection. The poems entertain a variety of stanzas, though most are couplets and tercets. VERDICT While not as accessible or direct as González's earlier work, this will appeal to fans of contemporary poetry.—Lawrence Olszewski, OCLC Lib., Dublin, OH
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781935536154
  • Publisher: Four Way Books
  • Publication date: 10/11/2011
  • Pages: 76
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

RIGOBERTO GONZÁLEZ is the author of two previous collections. He teaches at Rutgers University.
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Table of Contents

PART ONE: MUNDO DE MUJERES
Weimar
Black Blossoms
Mise-en-scène
The Unsung Story of the Invisible Woman
Weeping Icons
Blizzard
Dead Woman’s Jewelry at an Estate Sale
The Ballad of Lucila la Luciérnaga
The Girl with No Hands
The Beauty of Guanajuato
Thinking of Stones
Flor de Muerto, Flor de Fuego
Widow
PART TWO: FLOREO
Frida’s Wound
Floriuno: Orquídeas
Floridós: Cruz de Sal
Floritrés: Santuario
Floricuatro: Baby’s Breath
Floricinco: Doppelgänger
Floriséis: Sleeping Murders
Florisiete: Fear of Shadow Puppets
Floriocho: Los Disfraces de Frida
Florinueve: Death by Morning Glory
PART THREE: FLORIDEZ
Vespertine
PART FOUR: THE MORTICIAN POEMS
The Mortician’s Scar
The Mortician’s Bride Says I’m Yours
The Mortician’s Mother-in-Law Says Goodbye
The Mortician’s Daughter Dies Each Night
The Mortician’s Mother Returns
The Mortician’s Goddaughter Versed in Lust
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