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Black Codes (From the Underground)
     

Black Codes (From the Underground)

by Wynton Marsalis
 

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Branford Marsalis often talks about the "burnout" tunes that he, his brother and their talented teammates used when swinging full tilt back in the mid-'80s. The near manic "Chambers of Tain," the capper to Wynton's highly influential BLACK CODES, is one of those pieces. Boiling over with the ultra precise splashes and kicks of drummer Jeff "Tain" Watts, it's a great

Overview

Branford Marsalis often talks about the "burnout" tunes that he, his brother and their talented teammates used when swinging full tilt back in the mid-'80s. The near manic "Chambers of Tain," the capper to Wynton's highly influential BLACK CODES, is one of those pieces. Boiling over with the ultra precise splashes and kicks of drummer Jeff "Tain" Watts, it's a great example of the young trumpeter's regard for grace and ardor. Touting jazz as America's most intricate and elevated musical art, and backing up his bravura with impressive musical maneuvers, Marsalis spent the '80s on the front lines, demanding an increased respect for the style. The jury was out for a while on this elegant renegade, but when listeners heard pieces like "Phryzzinian Man" and the low-down bass/trumpet duet tucked away at the end of BLACK CODES, it was obvious that Marsalis was on his way to reinvigorating mainstream jazz with suits and chops.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Scott Yanow
This is probably the best Wynton Marsalis recording from his Miles Davis period. With his brother Branford (who doubles here on tenor and soprano) often closely emulating Wayne Shorter and the rhythm section (pianist Kenny Kirkland, bassist Charnett Moffett, and drummer Jeff Watts) sounding a bit like the famous Herbie Hancock-Ron Carter-Tony Williams trio, Wynton is heard at the head of what was essentially an updated version of the mid- to late-'60s Miles Davis Quintet (despite Stanley Crouch's pronouncements in his typically absurd liner notes about Marsalis' individuality). The music is brilliantly played and displays what the "Young Lions" movement was really about: young musicians choosing to explore acoustic jazz and to extend the innovations of the pre-fusion modern mainstream style. Marsalis would develop his own sound a few years later, but even at age 23 he had few close competitors.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/01/2008
Label:
Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC:
0886972436128
catalogNumber:
724361
Rank:
25357

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