Black Death

Black Death

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by Phillip Ziegler
     
 

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Described by the Guardianwhen it was first published as 'as exciting and readable account as you could wish', this new edition of the major study on the subject is illustrated by over seventy contemporary black and white illustrations. The text and pictures together offer vivid insights into this unparalleled human disaster: it is a book which will be as

Overview

Described by the Guardianwhen it was first published as 'as exciting and readable account as you could wish', this new edition of the major study on the subject is illustrated by over seventy contemporary black and white illustrations. The text and pictures together offer vivid insights into this unparalleled human disaster: it is a book which will be as much wanted by the general reader into fourteenth century history as by a specialist; its fully documented economic, historical and social details complemented by this acclaimed author's accessible style.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
An overview of the most devastating period of death and destruction in European history. The author, a biographer who describes himself as having come to his task "in a happy spirit of untrained enterprise," synthesizes the records of contemporary chroniclers and the work of later historians as he traces the path of the Black Death from the Orient, across Europe, to Scotland and Wales, and considers the ways in which it contributed to the disintegration of an age. Complemented by b&w and color photos, this highly readable account contains no original research and is intended for the general reader. Distributed by Books International. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780862998387
Publisher:
Sterling Publishing
Publication date:
01/08/1996
Pages:
249

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Black Death 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Philip Ziegler's history of the plague that struck Europe in the fourteenth century is a great academic piece. He examins many aspects of the era, always prodding for the cause and effect results. His use of the fictional town in the book does not retract from his overall success, but rather enhances the readers enjoyment of it. His conclusions of the effects the plague had on the Church are generally well thought out and correct, but I do take issue with one of his assertions. He states, possibly off the cuff, that the plague in some way made man question transbustantiation of the eurcharist. I'm not 100% sure of this assertion or his ability to prove it. The arguement over transubstantiation seems to really come out of the sixteenth century, when a large body of religiously minded clerics and priests began to question the doctrine. He uses many statistics which give weight to his arguement, but also makes it dry at times. This book is quite useful for academic purposes, but I do not believe everyday history buffs will like the work entirely. Ziegler's greatest accomplishment is how he presents the plague's effect on people, culture, class, and order. The medieval mind was much more complicated, as he points out, and was subject to the terrors of the plague. It was a turning point in history, not because it made revolutions, but because it planted the seeds of questioning and discord. The plague did not lead to the problems which faced Europeans after 1349, but played an instrumental role in those challenges. Overall this is a good book and one that serves well the historical discussion on the plague.