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Black Dog: The Long Dark Road

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Overview

Most people thought the Great Depression was the end of the world.

To one man, it was.

Amos "Black Dog" Harlow, an aging hobo and failed bluesman with no prospects, no family, and no place to call to home, wanders the hellish backdrop of Dust Bowl America with a guitar on his back and a grim past on his shoulders, following a spectral black dog only he can see down the dimly-lit backroads and blighted byways ...

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Black Dog: The Long Dark Road

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Overview

Most people thought the Great Depression was the end of the world.

To one man, it was.

Amos "Black Dog" Harlow, an aging hobo and failed bluesman with no prospects, no family, and no place to call to home, wanders the hellish backdrop of Dust Bowl America with a guitar on his back and a grim past on his shoulders, following a spectral black dog only he can see down the dimly-lit backroads and blighted byways of a forsaken land.

The black dog is an ill omen, and death and sorrow its only promises. But Amos must follow, drawn by the dog into the thick of supernatural danger, battling horrors and facing down evil that has crawled out of the Depression's dark underbelly with nothing but his wits, his music, and a bit of folk magic.

But there is an even greater shadow on the land. A dark killer with dark purpose strides the country, cutting a swath through the innocent and leaving a trail of blood in his wake. And if the serial killer the papers call Herod has his way, the world will drown in it.

Amos must battle his own demons and find Herod before the killer can finish his task-literally bringing Hell to earth.

Follow Amos and the black dog down the road to redemption in BLACK DOG: The Long Dark Road (2012) and the forthcoming BLACK DOG: Prophet in the Wilderness (2013).

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781475246698
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/9/2012
  • Pages: 360
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Matt Coleman was born in Savannah, GA-a place where ghosts and other weird beings are known to hang out-and raised on a steady diet of the pulps, comic books, horror stories, the Twilight Zone, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, and Coca-Cola and peanuts.
He lives in Pearland, Texas with his wife and daughter, where an entirely different set of weird beings reside.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

4 Star

(3)

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 16, 2012

    Must Read

    I have GOT to know what started Amos on this journey. That means I am eagerly waiting for the next book from this author.

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  • Posted December 10, 2012

    I am overwhelmingly blessed and exceedingly proud of my son, Mat

    I am overwhelmingly blessed and exceedingly proud of my son, Matt, for his God-given talent for storytelling and mastery of written expression. Black Dog: The Long Dark Road, is a great read and one I could not lay down. I had to know what horrific event would befall Amos next. Now, I’m awaiting the sequel and the screenplay. I was totally awed by Matt’s depiction of the “Great Depression” era which occurred some 43 years prior to his birth and 20 years prior to mine. He wrote about it as if he had lived through it. More importantly, after having read Black Dog, I felt as though I had lived through it. That’s quite an accomplishment for any author.

    There are those who would say that I am prejudiced or biased and they would be absolutely “dead on”. Webster defines prejudiced as “preconceived judgment or opinion” and biased as “an inclination of temperament or outlook”.

    Accordingly, I am both prejudiced and biased when it comes to appreciating extraordinary literary skills.

    Awesome job, Son!

    Love, Dad

    P.S. Don’t keep your old man waitin’ … I’ve got to know what’s goin’ on with Amos and the dog. I’m concerned about the old boy, don’t you know?

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  • Posted September 21, 2012

    Although I am into science fiction, this story was out of genre

    Although I am into science fiction, this story was out of genre for me. I normally read more space or fantasy type themes. I have not read much in the way of pulp horror. That being said, I very much enjoyed this book.
    The language in the book is very descriptive and paints a great picture of the stage in which the story is told. I come away from reading it tasting the grit of the road between my teeth.
    As Amos traveled down each road, highway, byway, alley, and game path I was in constant anticipation as to what would be his next adventure.
    I do look forward to Matt’s next telling of Amos’ tale and find out what made his what he is, and where he goes next.

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  • Posted June 10, 2012

    Compelling and original, a must read for fans of paranormal fiction and the occult

    Amos, "Black Dog" Harlow is an American original. He combines being a blues singer and folk magician under circumstances during the Great Depression that also make him a homeless hobo. A weird phantom black dog that only Amos can see leads him from one harrowing paranormal adventure to another. Amos, who is both a believable character and totally likeable despite his character flaws, sordid past and reluctant heroism, calls upon folk wisdom and supernatural powers mysteriously bequeathed to him to battle evil wherever the uncanny canine leads him.

    Matt Coleman, who is a budding theologian, has included depth and subtlety in his tales that the discriminating reader will appreciate. Amos is not only hero, poet, musician and magician, he is Everyman, a Christ figure and the Divine Fool of God.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 18, 2012

    an evocative tale

    Much better than the book that is currently flying off the shelves, money much better spent. Black Dog is extremely well-written, very imaginative stories... The type of stories you can imagine being told on a dark night by a grizzled old man who isn't trying to scare, but just letting you know there are things out there beyond the ken of man.

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  • Posted April 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Matt's first book, although the type of story isnt quite my styl

    Matt's first book, although the type of story isnt quite my style, it is still a good book. I think he is second to none even among the well established authors, for actually putting you in the time and situation with Amos "Blag Dog" Harlow. The verbal imagery in the story is amazing to the point if you read a storms coming, he can make you smell it in the air and feel it in your bones.

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  • Posted April 24, 2012

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading Black Dog, and as I went on found m

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading Black Dog, and as I went on found myself more compelled to keep going after completing each one of its tales. It starts off well and gets better as it goes on, as if you can see the author finding his way through this world he's created and figuring out how to really turn it into something memorable.

    More than anything else, Black Dog is worth reading because of its unique setting. While there's been many books written about the Dust Bowl, Black Dog is the first I've seen to give it a supernatural spin, and it really pays off. The familiar woes of the era are here -- hunger, poverty, despair -- but they are only the beginning of Amos's troubles. Pretty much every nightmarish thing that you can think of roams the back roads of this 1930's America, from cannibals to vampires to subterranean demon lords. We might have seen these terrors before, but we've never seen them in this setting, and Mr. Coleman finds some original ways to put them to use. We've all read a story at some point about a person possessed by a demon -- but where else have you read about a demonically possessed, cinderblock-swinging railroad bull who goes around smashing hoboes to a pulp?

    Of course, there's more to a quality book than an interesting setting. To capitalize on an intriguing world like this, you have to know your way around the written word, and Mr. Coleman more than proves himself adept at this task. The writing does a great job of creating a rich, convincing world. You feel the isolation as Amos makes a midnight trek through a swamp brimming with unseen evils, or the comfort of the cozy hamlet where he takes refuge during a torrential storm, you feel nauseated when a revivalist gathering is consumed with the types of horrors that would make Lovecraft pale. I've wondered how the quality of published writing will change now that e-books have reduced the barriers to achieving publication (Fifty Shades of Grey, anyone?), but there's nothing here to fuel my concerns. Mr. Coleman can really write.

    Black Dog is also greatly helped by its main character, the guitar-playing, straight razor-wielding hobo Amos Harlow. Just as his fingers do on the guitar, Amos' character hits just the right chord between vulnerable and heroic, between noble and flawed, to make the reader identify with him and want to see him persevere through the trials that his spectral companion leads him to.

    If there's a place where Black Dog stumbles a bit, it's in the brevity of some of its stories. The framework for something amazing is here, but the plots of some of the tales aren't quite long enough, or unpredictable enough, to always take full advantage of the author's strengths. While I understand that these are short stories, and aren't going to have all the twists and turns of full-length thrillers, I still found myself wishing that there could have been a bit more buildup, a bit more mystery, before the terrors emerged from the shadows. The basic ideas behind these stories are compelling enough, and Mr. Coleman's writing is strong enough, to have allowed these tales to benefit from a bit more fleshing-out.

    Of course, as I read through Black Dog I noticed the steady formation of a wider story arc, one that it sounds like will be explored further in the second book. If Amos' journey expands beyond the confines of some fairly self-contained short stories into a more winding storyline, Mr. Coleman will have some genuine five-star material on his hands.

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