Black Earth: A Journey through Russia after the Fall

( 2 )

Overview

Andrew Meier stood witness to the tumultuous final years of the USSR. But when many other journalists had taken leave of this vexed and beguiling land, believing it drained of stories. Meier returned, covering Russia and the former Soviet states as a Moscow correspondent for Time magazine from 1996 to 2001. In all, Meier reported from the lands of the former Soviet Union longer than almost any other Western journalist.

Inspired by both Russophile American writers like Edmund ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (29) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $11.00   
  • Used (26) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$11.00
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(469)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2003 Hardcover New

Ships from: san francisco, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$12.50
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(434)

Condition: New
Gift quality, Fine. A superior copy without defect. Clean, unmarked pages. Fine binding and cover. Hardcover and dust jacket. Ships daily.

Ships from: Boonsboro, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(144)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Andrew Meier stood witness to the tumultuous final years of the USSR. But when many other journalists had taken leave of this vexed and beguiling land, believing it drained of stories. Meier returned, covering Russia and the former Soviet states as a Moscow correspondent for Time magazine from 1996 to 2001. In all, Meier reported from the lands of the former Soviet Union longer than almost any other Western journalist.

Inspired by both Russophile American writers like Edmund Wilson and native geniuses like Anton Pavlovich Chekhov - both of whom had attempted to penetrate Russia's veils of secrecy and lore - Meier journeyed to the five corners of this resurgent and reputedly free land: newly rich Moscow, war-torn Chechnya, arctic Norilsk, haunted Sakhalin, and proudly crumbling St. Petersburg. Such a wide lens makes Black Earth perhaps the most insightful book on post-Soviet Russia written to date, one that captures its present limbo - a land rich in potential, yet its people ever fearful of staggering back into repression and tyranny.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
… Andrew Meier's Black Earth: A Journey Through Russia After the Fall, a book in which the author recounts his travels crisscrossing post-Soviet Russia, is a throwback, and all the more interesting for being so. — William Taubman
The Washington Post
Russia remains a land of interesting questions. How is it possible for a country to be free but not democratic? Is there a civil war brewing between the oligarchs and the Kremlin? Will Russia revive as it has so often in the past and be a mighty nation again, or must it reconcile itself to the fate of France and England? Andrew Meier neither asks nor answers those questions. He does something more valuable -- he renders a vivid yet necessarily inconclusive portrait of Russia in its current season of violence, corruption and sorrow. — Richard Lourie
Publishers Weekly
"How do you explain a state in decay?" the author of this engrossing, beautifully written book asks about a country where "the death of an ideology has displaced millions," a third of the households are poor, and epidemics of HIV, TB, suicide, drug abuse and alcoholism are rife. Meier, a Moscow correspondent for Time magazine from 1996 to 2001, attempted to answer the question by traveling to the four corners of Russia so he could report on the suffering of the people as they struggle to survive in the ruins of the Soviet experiment. He began in 2000 by going south to war-devastated Chechnya, particularly the town of Aldy, a district of Grozny, which earlier that year had endured the massacre of at least 60 of its citizens by Russian soldiers. He then traveled north, above the Arctic Circle, to the heavily polluted industrial city of Norilsk, originally a labor camp and now "a showcase for the ravages of unbridled capitalism," where descendants of the prisoners still mine for precious metals. Finally, he went west to St. Petersburg, "a den of thieves and compromised politicians" whose much-heralded revival is largely unrealized and where the people are still haunted by the assassination in 1998 of Galina Vasilievna Starovoitova, the country's leading liberal. After talking to scores of people-from survivors of the Aldy massacre to a harrowed Russian lieutenant colonel who runs the body-collection point closest to the Chechen battleground-Meier paints in this heartbreaking book a devastating picture of contemporary life in a country where, as one man put it, people have "lived like the lowest dogs for more than eighty years." Maps and photos not seen by PW. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Foreign Affairs
"Dark and wondrous as ever" are the words that conclude Meier's odyssey through the killing fields of Chechnya, up the Yenisey River to Norilsk in the far north — once part of Stalin's gulag — to the wild east of Sakhalin, where oil substitutes for gold. A journalist advantaged by fluent Russian and a youth's readiness for adventure, he probes deeply into the lives of everyone he meets, from the poor to the potentate, while traveling by road and river. Meier's passion is for the victims, for those who survived the camps and those caught in the Chechen "meatgrinder," and he works hard to get their stories, sometimes at great risk to himself. The result is a compassionate glimpse into the extremes where the new Russia meets the old, written with verve and humor.
Kirkus Reviews
An eye-opening tour of post-Soviet Russia by a young but well-seasoned Time correspondent. Years spent in Moscow and environs have given debut author Meier a decent command of Russian and plenty of insight into the way things work there. Yet, as he slyly remarks, "Longevity in Russia does not always yield understanding. Neither does intimacy guarantee knowledge." Perhaps depressed by years of living in a building where the light bulbs kept disappearing, ten of them being worth a bottle of vodka on the black market, and apparently stricken by the thought that Moscow, though with a population exceeding that of many European nations, might not be representative of the country as a whole, Meier undertook a journey in all cardinal directions that brought him to some hellish locales and introduced him to some iffy cuisine ("plates of glabrous chicken and half-fried potatoes" being among the finer offerings). One was Chechnya, where he found Russian soldiers playing backgammon with the rebels whom they would later be killing, yet one of the strange scenes out of what those soldiers have taken to calling "Putin’s War." Another was the fantastically remote Siberian city of Norilsk, "a severed world," Meier memorably writes, "a Pompeii of Stalinism that the trapped heirs of the gulag still called home." Yet another destination on Meier’s itinerary was Sakhalin Island, where Chekhov once documented the broken lives of prisoners and exiles whose descendants seem to be doing only marginally better. Meier writes with a fine, literate style that sometimes turns to bare-chested bravado, but that thrives on pointing out ironies: the fact that most of those gulag denizens wanted nothing more than to beseen as loyal comrades of the monster Stalin, the fact that Boris Yeltsin, then a Communist functionary, was so drunk on a visit to Sakhalin that he failed to notice that the island’s governor had replaced the obligatory portrait of Lenin with one of Adam Smith. A superb work of travel and reportage, and must reading for Russia hands.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393051780
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/2/2003
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.68 (h) x 1.49 (d)

Table of Contents

Prologue 3
I Moscow: Zero Gravity 7
II South: To the Zone 53
III North: To the Sixty-Ninth Parallel 159
IV East: To the Breaking Point 233
V West: The Skazka 309
VI Moscow: "Everything Is Normal" 385
Acknowledgments 447
Notes 451
Bibliography 481
Photo Credits 497
Index 499
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2004

    Great Depth

    The dumbest thing about this book is the subtitle, ¿A Journey Through Russia....¿ To most that sounds like some superficial travelog and if that is what you are looking for, this book certainly will not rate better than a single star. Meier has done in-depth journalistic studies of the people and politicians of Moscow, Chechnya, Norilsk, the infamous Gulag city,Vladivostok and Sakhalin, and St. Petersburg. The book does its best to describ the ¿riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma,¿ as Churchill described Russia. Meier shows us that the Russian people are sweet, kind, industrious, lazy, destructive, horrible and desperate. The most valuable lesson may be in his investigation of Chechnya and the terrible waste that has occurred there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2004

    Great Book

    Black Earth is a classic journey through post-communist Russia. The author, Andrew Meier captivates the emotions and feelings of the real people of Russia throughout his long journey. Meier journeys from Moscow through the Caucauses Mtns. then to Siberia and Sakhalin where he turns back to head toward Moscow once again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)