Black Entrepreneurship in America / Edition 2

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Overview

At a time of rapid economic change in black American communities, this important study provides fresh thinking about black values, institutions and economics. Black Entrepreneurship in America defines the cultural context of economic changes taking place in this most critical segment of American life.

It is well known that economic culture undergoes constant generation and regeneration, and with sufficient motivation, culture change; analysts also agree that entrepreneurship is the driving force behind sustained economic progress in modern industrial societies. This volume shows how black Americans can become equal participants in the American dream. To do this, the authors argue, they must overcome their former lack of participation, and galvanize the entrepreneurial potential of their own families and communities. This bold and pioneering effort outlines a strategy for translating the overall expansion of the American economy into specific modes of black economic development. As the authors emphasize, the impetus for change must come from within the black communities.

Despite good intentions and a twenty-five fold increase in welfare spending since 1967, centrally designed and administered social programs have largely failed to strengthen the indigenous cultural institutions upon which economic advancement depends. Low levels of business growth have retarded savings, investments, and jobs within black communities. This book describes how public policy decisions can support community-based entrepreneurship. Solidly grounded, the conclusions are based on interview data, consultations with a wide variety of academic and business experts, and a thorough review of relevant literature. The book will be of great interest to social researchers and policy analysts interested in black studies and social and economic change.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
While there have been some major events like the recent takeover of Beatrice Foods by a black-controlled conglomerate, by and large things have been quiet on the black independent business front. As the authors indicate in this highly readable book, there are relatively few black-owned businesses compared to the abundance, for example, of Korean and Vietnamese enterprises. Green and Pryde are vexed by this situation, which, as they stress, can no longer be attributed as in times past to external prejudice and discrimination. Public and private funding is available, along with a growing pool of black financial resources which could be tapped. Ambitious blacks, however, seem to prefer corporate life or public service to entrepreneurship. Although somewhat skimpy on anecdotal content and lacking in-depth analysis, this provides a good overall view of a somewhat perplexing aspect of the black cultural experience in America.-- Norman Lederer, UAW, Woodbridge, N.J.
From the Publisher

“The thesis of this book is that increased black entrepreneurship (self-employment or business ownership) is needed to improve the economic condition of blacks, particularly since the decline in the availability of well-paying industrial jobs that require relatively little education or vocational skills… The authors present an overview of the change in status of blacks relative to whites in income, wealth, educational attainment, unemployment rates, and entrepreneurship by means of census data… This very interesting book is strongly recommended for upper-division and graduate collections.”

—E. P. Hoffman, Choice

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781560008859
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/1/1989
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 194
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Shelley Green has been an associate of the Institute for the Study of Economic Culture at Boston University since its inception in 1985. She has also contributed research to the South Africa Beyond Apartheid Foundation, and published articles on economic development in the Third World.

Paul Pryde is president of Pryde, Roberts & Company, a consulting firm that plans and designs enterprise development programs for communities wishing to increase private investment employment and opportunity. He has lectured widely on the themes of this book, and his work includes Development Finance: A Primer for Policy Makers, a three volume monograph on the federal role in stimulating economic growth.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1 The Case for Black Entrepreneurship 1
2 Blacks in the Marketplace 17
3 Black Families and Family Firms 49
4 Education and Entrepreneurial Values 79
5 Community-Based Entrepreneurship 137
6 Building a New Agenda: Entrepreneurial Perspectives 169
Index 189
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