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The Black Garden
     

The Black Garden

5.0 3
by Joe Bright
 

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The sleepy town of Winter Haven holds a secret that has been buried for nearly twenty years. At the heart of the controversy is George O'Briens, who, along with his granddaughter, has been outcast by the community. When Mitchell Sanders, a college student from Boston, arrives to help renovate the O'Brien home, he finds himself entrenched in the family's dirty little

Overview

The sleepy town of Winter Haven holds a secret that has been buried for nearly twenty years. At the heart of the controversy is George O'Briens, who, along with his granddaughter, has been outcast by the community. When Mitchell Sanders, a college student from Boston, arrives to help renovate the O'Brien home, he finds himself entrenched in the family's dirty little secrets, putting him at odds with his new employers and the citizens of Winter Haven.

Editorial Reviews

Lynn Durham
Oh my God..... Where do i start? This book is a pleasure to read. No repetitive lines or scenarios to stretch the book. Very enjoyable. Well written. The Aurthor did a great job taking me away and placing me back to the past. Would recommend to anyone.
Lisa Harvey
I would recommend this book to mystery lovers and skeptics alike. It truly has something for everyone, universal appeal. I will definitely be watching for more of Joe Bright.
Fran Lewis
This is a must read for all mystery lovers and I hope he writes a sequel.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781905202980
Publisher:
Bewrite Books
Publication date:
04/17/2009
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
0.53(w) x 5.00(h) x 8.00(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Joe Bright spends far too much time probing the dark and macabre. It's an unhealthy obsession-or so his therapist claims. It started innocently when he was a child, with deviant drawings, and then moved into melancholy melodies as he learned the guitar and tried his hand at songwriting. As an adult, Joe worked as a technical writer and English professor. These careers led him down the grim path of story telling, starting first with poetry and short stories, and ultimately, introduced him to the dreaded novel.

Along the way, Joe left his home state of Wyoming, traveled the world, lived in Honolulu, San Francisco, and Berkeley, before settling in Los Angeles, where he drifted into hermitage as he became consumed by the dark arts of writing. Periodically, he allows himself to wonder out into the light and mingle with other members of his species. If you are not among those who have spotted him in his unnatural habitat, you can visit him at www.joebrightbooks.com.

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Black Garden 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Book_Lover_Lisa More than 1 year ago
First of all, let me just say that mystery is not my favorite genre, especially murder mysteries: I tend to find them dark, depressing, or gory. The Black Garden, however, is none of these things. Author, Joe Bright, has done an expert job of weaving a realistic story with heavy themes and rife with tragedy, yet which still leaves you with a light feeling, and the hope that there is true goodness in mankind. In The Black Garden university student and aspiring writer, Mitchell Sanders, accepts a job in a small Vermont town. His plan is to spend his days doing the work he was hired for-cleaning years of junk from an old Victorian house-and use his free time to finish his masterpiece of a novel. Leaving behind an ex-fiancé, and the drama he left to escape, he looks forward to the peace and uncomplicated friendliness of small town life. However, this dream doesn't last long. As he gets to know his employer, the ornery George O'Brien, and George's granddaughter, the beautiful but reclusive, Candice; he finds himself pulled into the mystery which surrounds their lives. Why does the whole town seem to despise them? Why do they never leave the house or have any interaction with other people? Mitch's lifelong resolve to stay uninvolved and avoid conflict is compromised as he learns more about the O'Brien's, and is able to see beyond George's crusty exterior, and Candice's aloof façade. As he begins to let them into his heart, he finds himself desiring to change their lives for the better. Yet this is harder than he had anticipated, since George has done such a good job of alienating everyone, so: "I did what any unethical, good-intentioned man would have done: I lied." His efforts begin to pay off, but as his work on the house continues, events from the past are stirred up, and Mitchell finds the indirect effects of his actions threatening the happiness of the very people he is trying to help. Joe Bright has managed to perfectly blend a large variety of elements to produce a very satisfying read: The dialog is witty and crisp, flowing effortlessly. The prose is beautiful and descriptive, and yet non-effusive; each word obviously carefully chosen. The characters are well developed, and lovable, even with their glaring faults. Humor is a major player in the novel: from joking between characters, to laugh-out-loud hilarious events. Read the rest of my review at: http://bookthoughtsbylisa.blogspot.com/2009/07/book-review-black-garden.html