Black Irish: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

In this explosive debut thriller by the author of Empire of Blue Water, a brilliant homicide detective returns home, where she confronts a city’s dark demons and her own past while pursuing a brutal serial killer on a vengeful rampage.

Absalom “Abbie” Kearney grew up an outsider in her own hometown. Even being the adopted daughter of a revered...
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Black Irish: A Novel

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Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

In this explosive debut thriller by the author of Empire of Blue Water, a brilliant homicide detective returns home, where she confronts a city’s dark demons and her own past while pursuing a brutal serial killer on a vengeful rampage.

Absalom “Abbie” Kearney grew up an outsider in her own hometown. Even being the adopted daughter of a revered cop couldn’t keep Abbie’s troubled past from making her a misfit in the working-class Irish American enclave of South Buffalo. And now, despite a Harvard degree and a police detective’s badge, she still struggles to earn the respect and trust of those she’s sworn to protect. But all that may change, once the killing starts.

When Jimmy Ryan’s mangled corpse is found in a local church basement, this sadistic sacrilege sends a bone-deep chill through the winter-whipped city. It also seems to send a message—one that Abbie believes only the fiercely secretive citizens of the neighborhood known as “the County” understand. But in a town ruled by an old-world code of silence and secrecy, her search for answers is stonewalled at every turn, even by fellow cops. Only when Abbie finds a lead at the Gaelic Club, where war stories, gossip, and confidences flow as freely as the drink, do tongues begin to wag—with desperate warnings and dire threats. And when the killer’s mysterious calling card appears on her own doorstep, the hunt takes a shocking twist into her own family’s past. As the grisly murders and grim revelations multiply, Abbie wages a chilling battle of wits with a maniac who sees into her soul, and she swears to expose the County’s hidden history—one bloody body at a time.

With Black Irish, Stephen Talty stakes a place beside Jo Nesbø, John Sandford, and Tana French on the cutting edge of psychological crime thrillers.

Praise for Black Irish
 
“Abbie Kearney is one of the most intriguing new suspense protagonists in memory, and Black Irish marks the captivating start of a brilliant thriller series.”—Tess Gerritsen
 
“Luxuriantly cinematic . . . a compulsively readable crime thriller . . . Move over V. I. Warshawski; Buffalo gets its own crime novel heroine.”The Buffalo News
 
“A suspenseful debut novel with a circuitous plot . . . Black Irish is simply a riveting read.”Booklist (starred review)
 
“Talty shows his chops when recounting [Buffalo’s] Irish roots.”Kirkus Reviews
 
“Talty does a fine job portraying the cohesiveness of the Irish, their loyalty to one another, and their obsession with their history. . . . A memorable story of betrayal and vengeance.”Publishers Weekly


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Talty’s first foray into crime fiction, a memorable story of betrayal and vengeance, centers on a working-class Irish enclave in contemporary Buffalo, N.Y. The macabre killing of gas-meter reader Jimmy Ryan brings Det. Absalom “Abbie” Kearney to South Buffalo (aka “the County,” as in the 27th county of Ireland), where “ancestry was everything.” As the adopted daughter of legendary cop John Kearney, Abbie is both an insider and an outsider. More gruesome, carefully staged deaths occur, pointing to members of the secretive, powerful Clan na Gael as targets. Hampered by community distrust, Abbie must dig deeply into long-buried secrets that could endanger her father’s life and reputation as well as her own life. Talty (Agent Garbo: The Brilliant, Eccentric Secret Agent Who Tricked Hitler and Saved D-Day) does a fine job portraying the cohesiveness of the Irish, their loyalty to one another, and their obsession with their history. Agent: Scott Waxman, Waxman Leavell Literary. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
“Abbie Kearney is one of the most intriguing new suspense protagonists in memory, and Black Irish marks the captivating start of a brilliant thriller series.”—Tess Gerritsen
 
“Luxuriantly cinematic . . . a compulsively readable crime thriller . . . Move over V. I. Warshawski; Buffalo gets its own crime novel heroine.”The Buffalo News
 
“A suspenseful debut novel with a circuitous plot . . . Black Irish is simply a riveting read.”Booklist (starred review)
 
“Talty shows his chops when recounting [Buffalo’s] Irish roots.”Kirkus Reviews
 
“Talty does a fine job portraying the cohesiveness of the Irish, their loyalty to one another, and their obsession with their history. . . . A memorable story of betrayal and vengeance.”Publishers Weekly
Library Journal
Best-selling nonfiction author Talty (Empire of Blue Water) sets his debut thriller, a grisly and complex tale, in his hometown of South Buffalo, NY, a working-class Irish American community. Harvard-educated homicide detective Absalom “Abbie” Kearney returns home to care for her ex-cop father and begins investigating an ongoing series of brutal murders with a puzzling signature and some kind of connection to her family. But her probe is stymied by her colleagues, leading her to uncover a secret Gaelic organization.

Verdict To say this book is an utterly compelling read would be an understatement, although the necessary background information on the Irish Republican Army and Gaelic groups is a bit dense for readers unfamiliar with the subject. However, some terrific surprises, which are more than welcome in a genre that can often be predictable, make up for the difficult history lesson. Buffalonians will love all the references to their city (e.g., Tim Hortons, the Skyway, and the perennially losing Buffalo Sabres hockey team), and homesick ex-pats will crave a Super Mighty from Mighty Taco. Fans of exciting and unpredictable thrillers will add this one to their must-read list. [See Prepub Alert, 8/3/12; library marketing.]—Samantha Gust, Niagara Univ. Lib., NY

(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Reviews
Talty harnesses his nonfiction skills to craft a novel that's centered on a feisty female cop in a history-rich Irish enclave in upstate New York. Absalom Kearney, adopted daughter of legendary Buffalo police detective John Kearney, has returned home to care for her rapidly declining father. Abbie, as she's known, worked as a police officer in Miami. She's been back for a year and has already established herself as the best homicide investigator in the BPD. When Abbie and her partner, "Z," catch a missing persons' case that turns out to be the tip of a serial killers' iceberg, she gets a chance to prove how good she is. The victim, Jimmy Ryan, a perpetual nonachiever who was tortured and left dead in an abandoned church, was discovered with a toy plastic monkey near his body. When someone tries to enter the home Abbie shares with her dad and leaves a similar toy on the doorknob, the female cop realizes that she's up against more than simply a clever killer. She tracks members of a secret Irish organization while chasing the murderer across her county and into neighboring Niagara Falls, all the time putting herself in harm's way. Talty shows his chops when recounting the area's Irish roots, but the first half of the story is sluggish. The relentless grimness of the setting, hopelessness of the local economy and general ineptness of other police officers combine to create a lackluster atmosphere populated by characters that lack both depth and vitality. That in itself could be forgiven if Talty's plot revealed brilliant detective work, but it doesn't. Instead, Abbie comes across as unreasonable, dismissive of her co-workers, and abusive to both other cops and suspects alike. Readers can be forgiven if they find Talty's story stretches credulity a bit, especially in the bloody second half. This Buffalo-based novel turns out to be more notable for its area history, moody setting and occasional smart turn of phrase than for the thuggish heroine.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345538871
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/26/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 38,082
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Stephan Talty is the author of the New York Times bestseller Empire of Blue Water, as well as Escape from the Land of Snows, The Illustrious Dead, and Mulatto America. Black Irish is his first novel.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Detective Absalom Kearney took the exit for the Skyway and the Ford nosed upward, climbing with the gray asphalt. Lake Erie was frozen over far below and to her right; to her left, Buffalo’s industrial waterfront slept as quiet and still as an oil painting. The factory smokestacks rode past, even with her windshield, but not a smudge of smoke drifted up from them. The waterfront was dead, slumbering for the past three decades. When Absalom used to ride along this part of the highway with her father twenty years before, she’d sometimes hear the smokestacks keen as the storm winds hit them.

She rolled down the window. The smokestacks were silent. The squall hadn’t peaked yet.

The crest of the road was ahead, only slate-­colored sky beyond. Three stories up, the Skyway was a ribbon of concrete spilled across the clouds. The wind shook the car with a guttering rattle. Abbie gripped the wheel harder.

She felt the fear grow inside her again, blooming like a growing rose in a sped-­up film. She took the Skyway every time she had to go to South Buffalo instead of driving down the 90, where the highway hugged the earth all the way to the exit at Seneca Street, by the junkyard that seemed to hold the same hundred wrecked cars she’d seen there as a child. Abbie told herself she took the road above the lake because she wanted to face the thing that terrified her. Which was what, exactly?

White tendrils of snow skimmed ahead of her Ford Crown Vic, pushed by the wind. The front edge of the storm was blowing in, spinning a spiderweb of frozen lace on the asphalt. Her eyes followed them as the road rose. Endlessly intricate patterns, hypnotic to watch them form and break, form and break.

There were no cars up ahead, not a single red brake light in the tall, rippling curtains of snow. The empty highway made her think that if she moved the wheel just two inches to the right she would put the car into the railing. A lull, the bang of ice, and then water. Lake Erie in January was a freezing tomb. Death in fifteen minutes. She’d looked it up, whether to calm herself or scare herself she had no idea.

She could almost hear the snow crystals scour the asphalt. They made a rough, hissing sound that grated on your eardrums. It was like the shushing of a dogsled heading into blankness, disappearing into the advancing storm . . .

Abbie leaned and turned up the radio, which the last detective had tuned to a country station and which she hadn’t bothered to change. She found the University of Buffalo station playing some obscure eighties synth music.

When she told her partner Z about how odd she felt driving Buffalo highways, he’d asked her why. She’d brushed it off then, but now she knew. It’s the emptiness. The enormous emptiness. Or the loneliness, that was it, the feeling of being alone in a place that should be filled with other people, cars full of families headed to the super­market, to the restaurant on the lake, to the hockey game. Buffalo had built miles of highways during the boom years, enough for a million people. The people that were going to come but didn’t. Why not? Where’d they disappear to? What happened to them?

Now the gray roads splayed across the city, empty half the time. The local joke was the only way Buffalo would get a rush hour was if Toronto got hit by a nuclear bomb and panicked Canadians came pouring south. You could drive for twenty minutes at a time at three on a weekday afternoon and not see another car pass you. The highway system was a network of veins laid across a dead heart.

But she couldn’t talk about those things, because eyes were already on her. She’d only been in Buffalo PD for a year. At thirty-­one, she was already on her second police job. If she messed this up like she did Miami . . .

The radio crackled. “Detective Kearney, this is Dispatch. McDonough wants to know your ETA.”

A missing persons case in the County. Must be a family with some connection to the Department, because the missing guy had only been gone since Monday. Just two days. And the officer on scene had called in to check on Abbie’s progress, making the family think their missing son or daughter was a priority. Usually, they would just ask the family if Danny or Maura preferred crystal meth or alcohol.

She kept her eyes on the yellow line as she reached to pick up the handset. The radio was mounted far enough away to give legroom for a bigger person—­that is, one of the sprawling six-­foot men that the Department seemed to breed, not the average-­sized Abbie. Finally, she hooked the cord with a French-­polished fingernail and brought the handset up.

“Kearney to Dispatch,” she said in a husky voice. “Twenty minutes.”

“Ten-­four.”

She descended down the back slope of the Skyway, the lake ­coming up on her right and then the raggedy little marina where her father had liked to fish in the spring. Next to it were the hulking grain elevators, massive concrete silos that, like all the old mills down along the waterfront, had been empty for decades. It used to be that ships filled with golden wheat from the West would come steaming into the harbor and unload their haul. The West grew it, and Buffalo milled it. Now the companies were bankrupt and kids with Irish pug noses and no concept of mortality fell to their deaths after breaking the silo locks and climbing up the inside on the rusty maintenance ladders. There wasn’t that much else to do in the County on a Saturday night.

There’d been one just last week, a seventeen-­year-­old boy named Fenore who’d wanted to impress his porky girlfriend, who they found crying hysterically at the foot of the silo. Abbie had done one recovery and that was enough. The insides of the things smelled like rancid beer, and at the bottom, always the broken bodies.

Abbie had begun to think of them as sarcophagi, twenty-­story vertical tombs facing out to the lake like some kind of postindustrial pyramids, the bones of the young inside. The whole city was entombed by the artifacts of its glory days.

She jumped off at Tifft Street, grinding the front wheels into a left turn, and shot off through the nature preserve.

Coming to South Buffalo was coming home, she guessed. But a little half-­Irish girl from outside the neighborhood could never have been at home here, even if she’d been adopted and raised by a legendary Irish cop, the great and terrible John Kearney. Certainly not a girl with an unknown father, who’d given her a shock of midnight-­black hair, what they called Black Irish in the County. And if that wasn’t enough, Harvard grads like Abbie were regarded as nothing less than two-­headed aliens.

They called South Buffalo the Twenty-­Seventh County, or the County for short, a patch of Ireland in the wilds of America. Blacks need not apply; strangers, be on your way; and faggot, can you outrun a bullet? Back in high school, her neighbors the Sheehans hadn’t even let that poor redheaded kid John Connell come on their porch to pick up their daughter Moira for the freshman dance. Not because he was Italian or German or, God forbid, Puerto Rican, not because he was too poor or addicted to alcohol or sexually suspect or pockmarked by acne. No. It turned out his family was from the wrong part of Ireland, Abbie’s friends patiently explained to her afterward. The Connells were from Mayo and the Sheehans were pure Kilkenny. “D’ya get it now? He’s the wrong county; the Sheehans won’t have a Mayo boy on their doorstep.” Their faces shiny with concern, emphatic that she should understand the intricacies of Irish-­American dating.

“Yep,” she’d told them. “I get it now.”

Inside, she’d thought, Looks like I can forget about getting a date in high school. And she’d been right. Her raven-­black hair, which was only accentuated by her pale skin and sky-­blue eyes, her long-­dead drug-­addicted mother, and her unknown father had doomed her to a life as an outsider in the County, where ancestry was everything. She remembered the moment as the beginning of her disastrous romantic history, and probably her sharp tongue, too.

That had been in the nineties. Things were different now, people said. There were even a few blacks and Latinos sprinkled among the County’s population, though you never seemed to see them walking the streets. Maybe they carpooled for safety and conversation.

But some parts of the neighborhood never changed. The clannish logic. The hostility to outsiders. The secret, ancient warmth. The alcoholism.

As her partner, Z, said whenever someone from this part of the city did something completely inexplicable or self-­destructive: “WATC.”

“We are the County.”

No other explanation necessary. Or possible.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(29)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    Unique 290 page book

    This 290 page, free book is unique. It has an unusual plot. The editing is 95% correct, which is nice. There is some rather tame sex, quite a few curse words, there are a few mentions of religion. The murders are extremely violent with lots of very graphic detail. This author can make the reader envision the murder scenes as if he/she were standing there, watching the carnage occur. The details of a death in a park horrified me. It was terrible and realistic. There is animal multulation, child abuse in its many forms, corrupt officals and kidnapping. I enjoyed this book very much. It kept me guessing to the end. The main character is a Irish, female detective, she has a strong persona, yet is feminine. This novel is a murder mystery. It is not a romance, although there are relationships. Men and women, who love intense, noir, murder mysteries will enjoy this novel. It is one of the better books, I have read this year. Be warned though, the violence really is graphic. For adults.

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    12 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2013

    The sanctity of a local Buffalo, NY church is forever compromise

    The sanctity of a local Buffalo, NY church is forever compromised when the maimed corpse of Jimmy Ryan is discovered in the basement. Tied to a chair, eyelids cut off as if he were made to look at something, the sight of Ryan's body sends a shock through the town. Author Stephan Talty describes the southern part of Buffalo, the County,  as having a "small-town feeling". Its best days behind it, the County is a place where news travels fast and nothing stays secret for long.
    Enter Absolam "Abbie" Kearny. Despite growing up in the County, she has always been a kind of outsider. Adopted at a young age by John Kearny, a local police legend, she has now returned to follow in her father's infamous footsteps. Tasked with the Ryan case, she is quickly met with resistance from the local townspeople and police.
    The County is mostly made up of Irish immigrants. As Abbie digs deeper into the murder, connections, both historical and personal, begin to reveal themselves. As further murders occur, Abbie struggles to stay ahead of the killer. The Buffalo police run an investigation parallel to hers, and Abbie soon finds herself a suspect in the case. As the tension rises Abbie is forced to question her sanity and family history, all culminating in a shocking twist that is sure to leave readers riveted.
    With his debut work of fiction, Stephan Talty instantly places himself among the great modern thriller authors such as Dennis Lehane and Tana French. Like Lehane and French, Talty manages to maintain exceptional characters, setting and suspense without ever sacrificing the integrity of his writing. This novel could have easily become a standard thriller, but Talty daftly takes his time to build each character, allowing the suspense to stay at a constant boil. In Abbie, Talty has imagined a believable protagonist, whose flaws and vulnerability allows readers to connect with her emotions and desire to succeed. I was hooked on this novel from beginning to end. Fascinated by the serial killer who tells, "his autobiography through corpses", I was shocked at the final turn that the events took. This exceptional novel has everything thriller fans have come to expect and gives them more than they could ever have hoped for.

    8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    Recommended!

    Great read. Suspensful until the end. Well wrtten and a must for Buffalonians!!!!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2013

    entertaining

    without giving away much of the story, I liked this novel quite a bit. It was entertaining without being overdone with excessive, verbose language. The killer is in no way possible to figure out until the end, which is good, because the individual who the investigation is leading to, is too obvious. Not to say my taste are similar to anyone else, but this was an entertaining novel.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 26, 2013

    Recommend this read

    Great plot with many twists.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 18, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Wow. I need aspirin. I have a tension headache from being so dan

    Wow. I need aspirin. I have a tension headache from being so dang tense for most of this book!
    This story drove me nuts trying to figure it all out. Lots of twists and turns, page turning thrills, one tough ass heroine and just when you think you have it…whapow, another twist. Great believable characters and a very interesting plot line.
    I learned a lot of things about my Irish heritage and the IRA I didn't know. Who had ever heard of the "Clan na Gael" before? The Irish war of independence in the 1920’s was largely funded by the clan. Seems I got a nifty little history lesson as well.
    I wanted to read this book when I saw the title. My father is 100% Irish and my family has often been referred to as “Black Irish”. I don't know if any of you out there are Irish but, we are a proud and stubborn people and like Abbie’s dad my father has many similar quirky personality characteristics. My parents had their honey moon at Niagara Falls and I have worked with kids in crisis, seems like me and Absalom do have a few things in common!

    Detective Absalom Kearney, Abbie, left home years ago to escape the stifling small town life only to return home to Buffalo many years later to tend her ailing father. The town she grew up in is very Irish and close knit. Taking care of their own and dispensing with punishment as they see fit is the Irish law of this new land.
    There is a serial killer on the loose and it seems it is up to Abbie and her partner Z to figure it out.
    Men in town are being tortured, killed and a toy monkey is left in or near each victim. Does Abbie’s Adoptive father have something to do with these gruesome killings? Are the police involved? does the Clan na Gael have a long reach from Ireland? The town clams up and as Absalom gets closer who will be the next to die?

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2013

    Hm

    A skylander? I would way rather be a pokemon trainer :)

    2 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2014

    Well written & worth the read!

    I was skeptical to purchase this book, but could not put it down once I begun reading it. Great mystery novel, the killer is a complete surprise until the last chapter. Looking forward to more from this author.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2013

    Great read!

    Look forward to more!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2013

    Fascinating story that takes place in an american cultural micro

    Fascinating story that takes place in an american cultural microcosm cloaked in a veil of secrecy.  A good psychological  thriller that  appears to have been carefully researched in order to provide an historical  framework that adds depth  to  the story

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Black Irish - Stellar Debut Novel This review first appeared at

    Black Irish - Stellar Debut Novel

    This review first appeared at Chorley Chronicals.
    I have found that topics of books written by male author's don't seem to garner as much of my attention as those of female author's do, and I think, more or less, that was the case with this book. It surely had to be a man that came up with a story about the Irish Catholics of New York!! 




    The narrator, David H. Lawrence XVII, seemed to be one of the most professional and seasonal narrator's that I have ever listened to, and especially lately, I have listened to a lot of audio books! He truly did a phenomenal job of narrating this book and capturing the very essence that Stephan Talty meant to capture when writing Black Irish!




    I feel like sometimes, mystery books seem to always follow the same type of theme or story, and I must admit, that although it wasn't my most favorite plot, it was a very unique plot that I don't think you're going to find in any other book! It was full of mystery and was very difficult to try and predict what the ending was going to be, and never in my life would I have guessed that it would have ended the way that it did, and who the serial killer was!




    Talty hit me in the heart when he designed the main character, Absalom Kearney.  There's nothing that I like more than a strong, independent woman, who can hold her own, maybe even more than the men she's around, and isn't afraid to show them or tell them that she can.  She proves to be an excellent cop in a land where female cops are very blatantly not welcome and I loved that!  I also enjoyed listening to the budding relationship between Abbie and her father, that she seemed ever so desperate to achieve, after, as I interpreted, she had failed a child!




    I did start to listen to this book about a year ago, and according to my Goodreads progress, I had gotten 38% into it, but I have absolutely no recollection of ever listening to any of it, so after listening to it this time, I can only figure that I just wasn't in the mood to listen at that time (I actually took about a 3 month hiatus from listening to audio books shortly thereafter), because I didn't have one bit of problem listening to it this go around!  As a matter of fact, I felt like it really took off from the very beginning and kept me interested throughout!




    Overall, this book didn't have me screaming from the mountain top that this was my most favorite book that I have ever read in the world, however, I wasn't disappointed that I had read it!  As a matter of fact, I will read the next book that also stars Abbie (although I haven't pinpointed if this is becoming a series or not!) when it is released this Spring!  The only reason I only gave it 3 of 5 bookworms is because the subject at hand was not my favorite!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    Black Irish

    Really good read, with a strong female lead caracter. If you enjoy cop novels, this is a book for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2014

    Tami L

    This book was a great read. Really kept your interest and desire to continue reading. I found it hard to put down. Highly reccommend reading it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2014

    Ancientstones

    Age: very old, elder, Apperance: darkbrown pelt, brown eyes, Mate: dead crush: is like 80 years old ( cat years counting) it would be creepy for this old cat to have a crush. History: very long. Wouldnt fit on this page. ( nothing else i need to add?)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

    Skyheart and co.

    Skyheart......she cat.....20 moons.......Medicine Cat
    <p>
    She is a dove gray shecat with gray paws that are tinted green on the tips due to nerbs touching them her underbelly is a very light gray she has incredibly fluffy and long fur she smells of lavender and a minty smell..her eyes are hazel...............kin dovepelt is mom ashblood is dad frozenlynx and gorsewind of ashclan are her cousins...........no crush no mate no kits...............she is wise for her age
    <p>
    Angelpaw and Darkpaw.........she cat.....tom......10 moons....... 10 moons
    <p>
    Angelpaw is a pure white she cat with black paws and a eggshelll white underbelly her eyes are ice blue she is friendly and out going she is daring and gets in trouble often.........Darkpaw is a pure black tom with a midnight blue underbelly and long claws..his eyes are a really bright blue he is agile swift and wise.......... kin mintclaw is mom firewood is dad angelpaw and darkpaw are siblings

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

    Snowfur

    Name-Snowfur
    Gender-female
    Age-11 moons
    Position-warrior
    Apprence-pure white fur with cryslte blue eyes
    Mate-none
    Crush-secreat
    Kits-none
    Personalty- is kind, quite, is very fun once you get to know her she is super loyal and a great fighter

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Silentkit

    A silver female kitten four moons old.History unknown.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 20, 2013

    Liked this

    Well written.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2013

    Wow! Can't wait for more from this author!

    A great book with a gritty look at an almost xenophobic community with a serial killer problem. I stayed up all night to finish it and wasn't disappointed! Can't wait for more!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    Highly recommend

    This is not a mystery that one automatically figures out-have to wait until the end and the surprise--enjoyed it.

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