Black Lies, Red Blood (Ann Lindell Series #5)

Overview

Kjell Eriksson has made a huge splash around the globe with his Ann Lindell police procedural series. Now Eriksson is back with another stunning mystery packed with surprises.

In Black Lies, Red Blood, police officer Ann Lindell is great at solving crimes, but she doesn't have as much luck in her personal life. When she meets journalist Anders Brant, Ann thinks her luck has turned around. But then Anders disappears without a trace and a homeless man's body is found with Anders' ...

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Overview

Kjell Eriksson has made a huge splash around the globe with his Ann Lindell police procedural series. Now Eriksson is back with another stunning mystery packed with surprises.

In Black Lies, Red Blood, police officer Ann Lindell is great at solving crimes, but she doesn't have as much luck in her personal life. When she meets journalist Anders Brant, Ann thinks her luck has turned around. But then Anders disappears without a trace and a homeless man's body is found with Anders' phone number in the dead man’s pocket. As Ann races to find Anders, she hopes that she will not be too late, and she also hopes that whatever she discovers will not break her heart.

Eriksson has been nominated for the Best Swedish Crime Novel five times, and readers will find this new book in his critically acclaimed and beloved series both shocking and intriguing.

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Marilyn Stasio
Some writers you read for story, some you read for content or style. Kjell Eriksson is a writer best read for sensibility. This Swedish author's police procedurals are as dark as any in the Nordic noir tradition, but their deep vein of compassion transforms them into something more warmblooded than your average cop novel.
Publishers Weekly
01/20/2014
Ann Lindell, a not-so-young single Swedish mother, is surprised to find love in Eriksson’s enjoyable fifth mystery featuring the Uppsala detective (after 2011’s The Hand that Trembles). When her talkative lover, journalist Anders Brant, tells her that he will be gone for a while, and his phone number is discovered on the body of a murdered homeless man shortly afterward, Ann must figure out how Anders is connected to this crime. How long can she keep her relationship with him secret from her colleagues? Yet, can she suddenly mistrust a man who means so much to her? Meanwhile, Ann investigates a cold case involving a girl who went missing on her 16th birthday “as if swallowed up by the earth.” Eriksson keeps the reader guessing, but his real strength is his ability to create descriptive details that bring even his minor characters alive. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
“Kjell Eriksson is a writer best read for sensibility. This Swedish author’s police procedurals are as dark as any in the Nordic noir tradition, but their deep vein of compassion transforms them into something more warmblooded than your average cop novel.” —The New York Times Book Review on Black Lies, Red Blood

"Eriksson  adds each piece of his complex murder puzzle to the picture with masterly control, and the heroine at the center of it all is compelling.  —Kirkus Reviews on Black Lies, Red Blood

 

"Eriksson keeps the reader guessing, but his real strength is his ability to create descriptive details that bring even his minor characters alive." —Publishers Weekly on Black Lies, Red Blood

 

"Eriksson, nominated five times for Sweden’s best crime novel award, effectively combines procedural and psychological detail in this involving mystery." —Booklist on Black Lies, Red Blood

"Riveting in tone and spirit . . . resembles the books of Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo, not to mention those of the modern master Henning Mankell." —Wall Street Journal on The Princess of Burundi

“Eriksson adds a new twist to the Swedish crime story, one especially likely to appeal to Henning Mankell fans.” —Booklist on The Hand that Trembles

“The brilliance of Eriksson's richly detailed crime novel… lies in its psychological and even sociological insights. Eriksson not only reveals a deep, sympathetic understanding for his large cast of characters but also evokes a pervasive sense of despair, reminiscent of Henning Mankell's.” —Publishers Weekly Starred Review on The Princess of Burundi

 “Reminiscent of Ruth Rendell. As insightful and intelligent as it is engrossing.” —Library Journal on The Cruel Stars of the Night

“Stunning, haunting…can chill you to the bone.”

—Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review on The Princess of Burundi

"Eriksson's plot is ingenious without being improbable, and his narrative manages to be exhilaratingly propulsive and rich in convincing psychological insight and engrossing details." —Los Angeles Times on The Princess of Burundi

"Eriksson is a major talent…will have McBain devotees enthralled."

Booklist on The Cruel Stars of the Night

From the Publisher
"Eriksson  adds each piece of his complex murder puzzle to the picture with masterly control, and the heroine at the center of it all is compelling.  —Kirkus Reviews on Black Lies, Red Blood

 

"Eriksson keeps the reader guessing, but his real strength is his ability to create descriptive details that bring even his minor characters alive." —Publishers Weekly on Black Lies, Red Blood

 

"Eriksson, nominated five times for Sweden’s best crime novel award, effectively combines procedural and psychological detail in this involving mystery." —Booklist on Black Lies, Red Blood

"Riveting in tone and spirit . . . resembles the books of Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo, not to mention those of the modern master Henning Mankell." —Wall Street Journal on The Princess of Burundi

“Eriksson adds a new twist to the Swedish crime story, one especially likely to appeal to Henning Mankell fans.” —Booklist on The Hand that Trembles

“The brilliance of Eriksson's richly detailed crime novel… lies in its psychological and even sociological insights. Eriksson not only reveals a deep, sympathetic understanding for his large cast of characters but also evokes a pervasive sense of despair, reminiscent of Henning Mankell's.” —Publishers Weekly Starred Review on The Princess of Burundi

 “Reminiscent of Ruth Rendell. As insightful and intelligent as it is engrossing.” —Library Journal on The Cruel Stars of the Night

“Stunning, haunting…can chill you to the bone.”

—Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review on The Princess of Burundi

"Eriksson's plot is ingenious without being improbable, and his narrative manages to be exhilaratingly propulsive and rich in convincing psychological insight and engrossing details." —Los Angeles Times on The Princess of Burundi

"Eriksson is a major talent…will have McBain devotees enthralled."

Booklist on The Cruel Stars of the Night

Kirkus Reviews
2013-12-15
Police inspector Ann Lindell tackles an investigation that's painfully close to home. Love comes unexpectedly to workaholic Swede Ann in the person of Anders Brant, who is emotional, loving and utterly unlike the brooding, unavailable men she usually falls for. He even seems to understand her commitment to her work. But she's not used to such turbulent and unsteady feelings, which dog her on the job. Her current case, the disappearance of teenager Klara Lovisa several months ago, is frustratingly, bafflingly cold. As Ann sets about the tedious task of interviewing friends and family members again, the murder of Bosse Gransberg, a homeless sometime handyman, is also under investigation. The detectives on this case, Ola Haver and Beatrice Andersson, face unusual hostility and resistance from members of the community. Thoughts of Brant provide Ann a much-needed respite during her grim task. But when Brant goes missing, her emotions get a tumultuous workout. Worse, Brant's phone number is found on Bosse's person. Fortunately for her, Ann has not shared any details of her new relationship with colleagues. Inconveniently, Brant happens to be in Brazil. Unable to defend himself, he emerges as the prime suspect. What else can Ann do but solve the crime in order to save him? Eriksson (The Hand that Trembles, 2011, etc.) adds each piece of his complex murder puzzle to the picture with masterly control, and the heroine at the center of it all is compelling.
Library Journal
03/15/2014
Police officer Ann Lindell has been alone longer than she cares to admit. When taciturn journalist Anders Brant enters her life and sweeps her off her feet, she can't believe her luck. But just as suddenly as he appears, he vanishes. Ander's departure coincides with the killing of a homeless man, who happens to have the journalist's phone number in his pocket. As Ann struggles to find Anders and hopefully clear his name, another person related to the dead man is also found dead. Lindell and her fellow officers are confronted with too many clues and too few conclusions. And when Brant finally responds with a message mentioning murder, Lindell must face the evidence that's right in front of her. Eriksson's latest mystery (after The Hand That Trembles) ups the ante, piling up bodies, clues, and multiple narrators. But the numerous voices, dead ends, and open cases ultimately lead to a confusing stew full of way too many ingredients. VERDICT Voracious mystery lovers will likely pick up this title enthusiastically; the more discerning reader will end up disappointed and frustrated. [See Prepub Alert, 10/20/13.]—Jennifer Rogers, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community Coll. Lib., Richmond
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312605049
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/29/2014
  • Series: Ann Lindell Series , #5
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 149,707
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

KJELL ERIKSSON is the author of the internationally acclaimed The Princess of Burundi, The Cruel Stars of the Night, The Demon of Dakar, and The Hand that Trembles. His series debut won Best First Novel 1999 by the Swedish Crime Academy, an accomplishment he later followed up by winning Best Swedish Crime Novel 2002 for The Princess of BurundiBlack Lies, Red Blood is his fifth novel in the series. He lives in Sweden and France.

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Read an Excerpt

One

 

 

“You’re different,” said Ann Lindell.

A tired phrase, a worn-out expression, but there was no other way to put it.

“Is that a good thing?”

Anders Brant was lying with his eyes closed, one hand on his belly, the other behind his neck. She observed him: the dark, sweaty hair by his temples, the trembling eyelids, given a violet-red hue by the first morning light, and the beard stubble—“my scourge,” he said, as he always had to shave—which had scratched her.

He was not a powerful man, not much taller than she was, with a boyish body that made him look younger than almost forty-four. From his navel down to his pubic hair a dark, curly strand ran that resembled an exclamation point.

His face was thin and lacked strong lines, although when he smiled it came to life. Maybe it was his casual manner that first aroused her interest. Later, when she got to know him better, the picture got more complicated. He was just different in that way, often carefree and a little roguish, but with an inner fervor that was sometimes seen in his eyes and his gesturing hands. Then he was anything but carefree. As she observed his relaxed facial features, it occurred to her that his attitude reminded her of Sammy Nilsson, the one colleague she could confide in and discuss things other than the trivialities of work.

“I don’t know,” she said, in a tone more ominous than she intended, now feeling even more banal.

But perhaps he understood: She was in love. Until now neither of them had hinted at anything like that.

And was that good? He was different in every conceivable way from the men she’d been with. There weren’t many really, two somewhat longer relationships—Rolf and Edvard—and a few short-lived ones, but the few weeks with Anders Brant had really shaken her up.

For the first time in a very long while she felt desired. He made no secret of his longing for her. He might call her at work and whisper things on the phone that left her speechless, and then when they met he drew her to him; despite his slender body his hands felt powerful. Sometimes she warded him off, afraid that Erik would surprise them, and also afraid of the rush she felt in her body, as if they were doing something forbidden.

“Hugging won’t hurt you,” he would say. “Relax.”

He courted her, and he talked; never had Ann’s apartment been filled with so many words. Talk, but never about before and later, always about the present. Unwilling to offer details about his past, not a word about his plans or dreams.

Ann knew absolutely nothing about his family, other than that he was the oldest of four children, and that his mother lived somewhere in south Sweden. His father had left early on; it was unclear whether he was alive. When she asked he simply mumbled something about “the old man was too damn gloomy.”

Few things surprised him. He noted her own biographical details without showing any great interest, and did not connect her experiences to scenes from his own life.

He showed the greatest interest and engagement when they were watching the evening news together. Then he sometimes got agitated, or cynically scornful. Journalist colleagues that he thought were not doing their job gave rise to derisive, in some cases spiteful, comments.

Despite this singular apathy with regards to the private sphere, he was present; she never felt bored or overlooked. He glided into her life without a lot of fuss. She liked that. She thought the contrast to her life, so heavily scheduled for so long, would have been too great if he broke out in impassioned declarations of love and constructed romantic castles in the air.

It was as if he took it for granted that they would be together.

Sometimes she noticed a certain restlessness in him. He would fall silent, lose focus, and almost be dismissive, even if he did not verbalize his irritation. On a few occasions he left her on the couch or at the kitchen table and went out on the balcony. Those were the only times she saw him smoke, slender cigarillos that he enjoyed with eyes closed, leaning back in the wicker chair she once got as a present from Edvard. Then he wanted to be alone, she realized that.

After smoking his cigarillo he always brushed his teeth, which she also appreciated.

“I have to leave,” he said, abruptly interrupting her thoughts. “I may be gone a week or two.”

He got up from the bed, hurriedly dressed, and left.

—K, 31

 

 

Copyright © 2008 by Kjell Eriksson

Translation © 2014 by Paul Norlen

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