Black Men on Race, Gender, and Sexuality: A Critical Reader

( 2 )

Overview

"This voice and timely book addresses the perceptual split between an officially 'colorblind' world and the lived experience of so many for whom race determines so much. Although centered on images of black men, these extraordinary essays provide compelling insights about stereotypes of women, whiteness, class status, ethnicity, and gender. From 'suspect profile' to 'natural athlete,' the disuniting effects of racial clichés are meticulously analyzed in this sharp and always moving anthology."
--Patricia J. ...

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Overview

"This voice and timely book addresses the perceptual split between an officially 'colorblind' world and the lived experience of so many for whom race determines so much. Although centered on images of black men, these extraordinary essays provide compelling insights about stereotypes of women, whiteness, class status, ethnicity, and gender. From 'suspect profile' to 'natural athlete,' the disuniting effects of racial clichés are meticulously analyzed in this sharp and always moving anthology."
--Patricia J. Williams, Author of The Rooster's Egg and The Alchemy of Race and Rights

"This exciting anthology breaks new ground in the battle to end misogyny and sexism. It gathers for the first time the diverse and eloquent voices of black men -- many of them speaking out as feminists for a revitalized vision of feminism. This unique collection offers insights, perspectives rarely heard, and tremendous hope. It is required reading for all who care about the intersection of race, gender, class and sexuality."
--Urvashi Vaid, Director of the Policy Institute of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and author of Virtual Equality: The Mainstreaming of Gay and Lesbian Liberation

In late 1995, the Million Man March drew hundreds of thousands of black men to Washington, DC, and seemed even to skeptics a powerful sign not only of black male solidarity, but also of black racial solidarity. Yet while generating a sense of community and common purpose, the Million Man March, with its deliberate exclusion of women and implicit rejection of black gay men, also highlighted one of the central faultlines in African American politics: the role of gender andsexuality in antiracist agenda.

In this groundbreaking anthology, a companion to the highly successful Critical Race Feminism, Devon Carbado changes the terms of the debate over racism, gender, and sexuality in black America. The essays cover such topics as the legal construction of black male identity, domestic abuse in the black community, the enduring power of black machismo, the politics of black male/white female relationships, racial essentialism, the role of black men in black women's quest for racial equality, and the heterosexist nature of black political engagement.

Featuring work by Cornel West, Huey Newton, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Houston Baker, Marlon T. Riggs, Dwight McBride, Michael Awkward, Ishmael Reed, Derrick Bell, and many others, Devon Carbado's anthology stakes out new territory in the American racial landscape.
--Critical America, A series edited by Richard Delgado and Jean Stephancic

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This voice and timely book addresses the perceptual split between an officially 'colorblind' world and the lived experience of so many for whom race determines so much. Although centered on images of black men, these extraordinary essays provide compelling insights about stereotypes of women, whiteness, class status, ethnicity, and gender. From 'suspect profile' to 'natural athlete,' the disuniting effects of racial clichés are meticulously analyzed in this sharp and always moving anthology."

-Patricia J. Williams,author of The Rooster's Egg and The Alchemy of Race and Rights

"This exciting anthology breaks new ground in the battle to end misogyny and sexism. It gathers for the first time the diverse and eloquent voices of black men—many of them speaking out as feminists for a revitalized vision of feminism. This unique collection offers insights, perspectives rarely heard, and tremendous hope. It is required reading for all who care about the intersection of race, gender, class and sexuality."

-Urvashi Vaid,Director of the Policy Institute of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and author of Virtual Equality: The Mainstreaming of Gay and Lesbian Liberation

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Formerly Visiting Associate Professor of Law and Faculty Fellow at the University of Iowa, Devon Carbado is Acting Professor of Law at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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Table of Contents

Foreword: Why We Can't Wait: Integrating Gender and Sexuality into Antiracist Politics
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Where and When Black Men Enter 1
I The Million Man March: Racial Solidarity or Division? 19
1 To March or Not to March: Two Op-eds 22
Why I Didn't March 22
Why I'm Marching in Washington 26
2 "Claiming" and "Speaking" Who We Are: Black Gays and Lesbians, Racial Politics, and the Million Man March 28
3 Buck Passing: The Media, Black Men, O.J., and the Million Man March 46
4 My Two Mothers, America, and the Million Man March 54
5 Sadomasochism and the Colorline: Reflections on the Million Man March 68
6 "Marchin' On": Toward a Politics for the Twenty-First Century 85
7 Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Man 99
II Engendering Black Racial Victimhood 117
8 Pull Together as the Community 120
9 "You're Turning Me On": The Boxer, the Beauty Queen, and the Rituals of Gender 128
10 The Social Construction of a Rape Victim: Stories of African-American Males about the Rape of Desiree Washington 147
11 The Construction of O. J. Simpson as a Racial Victim 159
12 Missing in Action: Race, Gender, and Black Students' Educational Opportunities 194
13 The Message of the Verdict: A Three-Act Morality Play Starring Clarence Thomas, Willie Smith, and Mike Tyson 212
14 The Sexual Diversion: The Black Man/Black Woman Debate in Context 237
III Antiracist Discourse Outed 249
15 Can the Queen Speak? Racial Essentialism, Sexuality, and the Problem of Authority 253
16 Signifying on the Black Church 276
17 Black Rights, Gay Rights, Civil Rights: The Deployment of Race/Sexual Orientation Analogies in the Debates about the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy 283
18 My Gay Problem, Your Black Problem 303
19 Black Macho Revisited: Reflections of a SNAP! Queen 306
20 On Eldridge Cleaver: He Is No James Baldwin 312
21 Baraka's Dilemma: To Be or Not to Be? 317
22 AIDS in Blackface 324
23 Fixing the Faggot: Black Subjectivity as "Autocartography" in the Work of Lyle Ashton Harris 338
24 The Elixir of Dennis Rodman: Race, Sexual Orientation, and Anti-Essentialism 347
IV Black Male Feminism, Sexism, or Paternalism? 359
25 A Black Man's Place in Black Feminist Criticism 362
26 The Challenge and Possibility for Black Males to Embrace Feminism 383
27 The Women's Liberation and the Gay Liberation Movements 387
28 Some African American Males' Perspectives on the Black Woman 390
29 Silent Acquiescence: The Too-High Price of Prestige 408
30 "You Cain't Trus' It": Expert Witnessing in the Case of Rap 414
Epilogue: Straight Out of the Closet: Men, Feminism, and Male Heterosexual Privilege 417
Contributors 449
Permissions 459
Index 461
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 1999

    Perfect Reading to Start the New Millenium!

    If I had one wish to make, it would be that every straight black man in America read this book! This book has two small flaws. First, its discussion on homophobia is insignificant compared to its discussion of sexism. Also, this book is elitist (it's written almost entirely by tenured law professors and other academics, it refers to works that only professors and their students have read, it could depend upon real-life experiences but instead bases itself upon critical theory) when it could have reached such a wider audience. Despite these small concerns, I loved this book. This book by black men does an effective job of explaining why antiracists must commit themselves toward fighting misogyny and heterosexism. It is the first text that lays out in explicit terms why straight black men need to take the concerns of black feminists and black gay men and lesbians seriously. My life has been improved knowing that this book exists.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2013

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