Black Neighbors: Race and the Limits of Reform in the American Settlement House Movement, 1890-1945

Black Neighbors: Race and the Limits of Reform in the American Settlement House Movement, 1890-1945

by Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn
     
 
In 'Black Neighbors', Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn analyzes this reluctance by the mainstream settlement house movement to extend its programs to African American communities, which she argues, were assisted instead by a variety of alternative organizations. Lasch-Quinn recasts the traditional definitions, periods, and regional divisions of settlement work and uncovers a

Overview

In 'Black Neighbors', Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn analyzes this reluctance by the mainstream settlement house movement to extend its programs to African American communities, which she argues, were assisted instead by a variety of alternative organizations. Lasch-Quinn recasts the traditional definitions, periods, and regional divisions of settlement work and uncovers a vast settlement movement among African Americans.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
An excellent new perspective on the historical development of the American settlement movement.

Arkansas Historical Quarterly

This is an excellent book, short, well written, informative and interestingly illustrated.

Labour History Review

Should be required reading for . . . all social workers concerned with the linkage between personal social services and social reform.

Social Service Review

Black Neighbors is social history at its best. . . . [It is] solidly grounded on empirical research and illuminated by sound theory.

Clarke Chambers, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

A marvelous study.

Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807821145
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
12/28/1993
Edition description:
1
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.90(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn has crafted an excellent new perspective on the historical development of the American settlement movement.—Arkansas Historical Quarterly

Black Neighbors should be required reading for social welfare historians, settlement house and neighborhood center staff and board members, and all social workers concerned with the linkage between personal social services and social reform.—Social Service Review

A marvelous study. [Lasch-Quinn] offers both a penetrating critique of the American settlement house movement and a new story that rights the regional balance and brings African American struggles in their own behalf to the fore.—Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

This is an excellent book, short, well written, informative and interestingly illustrated. . . . It widens our understanding of the American settlement movement and makes a valuable contribution to the lengthy but inconclusive history of race relations.—Labour History Review

Black Neighbors is social history at its best. . . . [It is] solidly grounded on empirical research and illuminated by sound theory.—Clarke Chambers, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Meet the Author

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn is assistant professor of history at Syracuse University.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >