Black Potatoes

Black Potatoes

5.0 1
by Susan Campbell Bartoletti
     
 

This is the story of the disaster that struck Ireland from 1845 to 1850. Overnight, a mysterious blight attacked the potato crops, destroying the staple food of the Irish people.

Overview

This is the story of the disaster that struck Ireland from 1845 to 1850. Overnight, a mysterious blight attacked the potato crops, destroying the staple food of the Irish people.

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
It is estimated that in the 1840s, each person in Ireland ate between 7 and 15 pounds of potatoes a day, and many animals ate potatoes as well. But when a fungus attacked the fields, a crisis quickly developed. The Great Famine led to even further resentment against the governing English after the death of a million from starvation and disease and the scattering of some two million more, and it strengthened the determination of the Irish to overcome such adversity and survive as a people. Vivid stories were collected from descendants of the famine-stricken poor, and powerful pen-and-ink sketches from contemporary newspapers make clear the dire situation of those who were evicted and the many who were starving. Ethnic and religious prejudices are presented realistically, and there are references to the present crisis in many societies and what the appropriate response should be today when human beings lack access to food. A powerful and important book. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2001, Houghton Mifflin, 184p. illus. map. bibliog. index., Ages 12 to adult.
—Maureen Griffin

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756950811
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Pages:
184
Sales rank:
597,915
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Susan Campbell Bartoletti is the award-winning author of several books for young readers, including Black Potatoes: The Story of the Great Irish Famine, 1845–1850, winner of the Robert F. Sibert Medal. She lives in Moscow, Pennsylvania.

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